Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, July 23, 2019

In 2017, a worker in Texas died on the job every 16 hours. They died from electrocution, asphyxiation, falls from roofs, exposure to toxins, equipment malfunctions, heat stroke and automobile collisions. The death toll exceeded the number of murders in Houston, Dallas, Fort Worth and Austin combined.

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... "Literally, we're not holding employers liable for the lives of their workers," ...

Just after one of the chemical factory explosions in Texas, the plant manager was being interviewed by a local TV news crew.

The plant manager stated firmly that his plant was in full compliance with every Texas regulation that applied to the plant.

I was somewhat surprised that the plant manager would be making a joke like that, when some of his workers had died in the explosion. Neighboring residential properties were also damaged.

#1 | Posted by LampLighter at 2019-07-23 11:22 AM | Reply

"along with the fourth-lowest union representation in the country."

But...but...but...Texas is a Right To Work state. Isn't that supposed to be GOOD for the workers? At least that what the proponents keep telling us.

I mean...look what it did for Alabama: they went RTW in 1953, and have been basking in economic overdrive ever since!

#2 | Posted by Danforth at 2019-07-23 11:27 AM | Reply | Funny: 1 | Newsworthy 6

The plant manager stated firmly that his plant was in full compliance with every Texas regulation that applied to the plant.

I was somewhat surprised that the plant manager would be making a joke like that, when some of his workers had died in the explosion. Neighboring residential properties were also damaged.

Sad thing is they probably were compliant with all state regs.

That's the problem with the righty corporate sycophantic mindset, when it comes to a corporation and it's workers, the corp will always choose over the workers. Workers are disposable.

#3 | Posted by jpw at 2019-07-23 12:10 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

Thank god they don't have any of them job killing regulayshuns to kill corporate profits.

#4 | Posted by Nixon at 2019-07-23 12:16 PM | Reply

THE FREE MARKET IS BIGGER IN TEXASSSSSS; You have the freedom to die a libertarian death in the Lone Star State.

#5 | Posted by IndianaJones at 2019-07-23 12:18 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Texas is also the only state that doesn't require workers' compensation insurance for private employers.

1. Texas, unlike other states, does not require an employer to have workers' compensation coverage.

2. Subscribing to workers' compensation insurance puts a limit on the amount and type of compensation that an injured employee may receive - the limits are set in the law.

3. Being a "non-subscriber", i.e., going "bare" or without coverage, leaves an employer open to personal injury lawsuits from employees who are injured on the job - the damages and attorney's fees are almost unlimited - in addition, certain defenses available in most personal injury lawsuits, such as assumption of the risk, contributory negligence, "last clear chance", and co-worker negligence, are not available to a non-subscriber in a job injury case. https://twc.texas.gov/news/efte/workers_compensation.html

Employer Participation in the Texas Workers' Compensation System
• Overall, the employer subscription rate fell from 78 percent in 2016 to 72 percent in 2018, but these two years remain the highest subscription rates since 1993.

• The percentage of Texas private-sector employees working for subscribers remained stable at 82 percent.

#6 | Posted by et_al at 2019-07-23 02:23 PM | Reply

work comp rates are high in Texas for those reasons.

not required by employers and a rotten safety culture.

Overall...workplace safety has gotten better...In most states I write work comp...rates have fallen over the past 4-5 years. Most are red states, BTW.

#7 | Posted by eberly at 2019-07-23 02:33 PM | Reply

The absence of a work comp carrier to offer loss control services and safety consulting is why so many employers in Texas have unsafe working conditions.

#8 | Posted by eberly at 2019-07-23 02:35 PM | Reply

Why wouldn't someone step in to serve that market? Must be some reason. Same thing with et Al's comment. Obviously, there is a reason it's still unsafe.

#9 | Posted by BruceBanner at 2019-07-23 10:32 PM | Reply

I view corporate and OSHA training as just checking boxes and CYA for liabilities. Some of it has been informative I guess, but ultimately my safety is in my own hands. The company just wants to get the work done and will skirt safety unless pressed and called out.

#10 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2019-07-23 10:42 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

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The company just wants to get the work done and will skirt safety unless pressed and called out.

Exactly.

#11 | Posted by REDIAL at 2019-07-23 10:51 PM | Reply

Texas has forever not required work comp for everyone

That is the problem.

Kansas has some exempt classes of business such as farms while other states have virtually no exemptions.

Texas has always just been like this.

#12 | Posted by eberly at 2019-07-23 10:53 PM | Reply

#10 | POSTED BY SHEEPLESCHISM

You have no clue what you're talking about.

Not surprised, just want to make sure that in this instance, you know for sure that you have no clue what you're talking about.

#13 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2019-07-24 12:10 AM | Reply | Funny: 1 | Newsworthy 1

Falling from a roof due to heat stroke because you didn't get a break is the most libertarian thing i've ever heard of. Conservatives should be proud.

#14 | Posted by JOE at 2019-07-24 12:47 AM | Reply

A few little facts for y'all. Drilling and oil field work is hazardous, it is vertical mining and petroleum is explosive. Texas is hot, hot enough to kill you in about an hour. BTW, you can not roof a house when it is over 100 degrees. The shingles melt. We also have more chemical plants than any other state except Loiusana. That is seriously hazardous if a mistake is made, flammable and toxic chemicals heated and under extreme pressure has the potential for disaster at all times. We have more agriculture going on than any other state. That has always been in the top four hazardous jobs. Heavy machinery and the environment and not to ignore dealing with large animals has some inherent risk.
Of course you can get a safe job making coffee and be paid accordingly.
Some jobs are inherently dangerous, I note no one brought up Washington state, harvesting trees and commercial fishing is actually more dangerous than any of those listed above.

#15 | Posted by docnjo at 2019-07-24 07:01 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

Texas Workers Are Dying on the Job at Alarming Rates...

As Californians, fleeing higher taxes, move in to replace them...

#16 | Posted by Pegasus at 2019-07-24 07:31 AM | Reply

#12 | Posted by eberly, Worker's comp is required for all employees, even in Texas. The exception is temp or casual labor. They are supposed to be covered by their agency. Of course if you pick up some guys hanging out at Lowe's you get what you pay for.

#17 | Posted by docnjo at 2019-07-24 08:47 AM | Reply

-Worker's comp is required for all employees, even in Texas

twc.texas.gov

#18 | Posted by eberly at 2019-07-24 09:23 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#18 | Posted by eberly My experence with the subject is from the 70s, I guess the laws have changed.

#19 | Posted by docnjo at 2019-07-24 09:48 AM | Reply

Who would have thought such things would happen in a state where the governor happily brags about "low services" and refuses to perform any oversight on predatory lenders and his own criminal AG and Lt. Governor?

#20 | Posted by e1g1 at 2019-07-24 12:12 PM | Reply

Republicans don't care.

#21 | Posted by bayviking at 2019-07-24 03:28 PM | Reply

automobile collisions. Now there is a good one. Better get osha on that job site.

#22 | Posted by Sniper at 2019-07-24 03:34 PM | Reply

#10 | POSTED BY SHEEPLESCHISM
You have no clue what you're talking about.

#13 | POSTED BY RSTYBEACH11

He hears that pretty often.

#23 | Posted by johnny_hotsauce at 2019-07-24 06:49 PM | Reply

"Some of you are going to die.

Martyrs, of course, in the freedom I shall provide."

--The Knife

#24 | Posted by Angrydad at 2019-07-24 10:01 PM | Reply

#19 | Posted by docnjo, Actually what the state does not enforce, the insurance companies do. You can not operate anything more than a one man business without liability insurance. Banks will not loan money to someone operating without insurance. Texas is like that, you might think that things are different, but in practice it is much more in line with common business practice than you might suspect.

#25 | Posted by docnjo at 2019-07-25 01:41 AM | Reply

#20 | Posted by e1g1, predatory lenders are not controlled by the state. Those payday loan places are under federal jurisdiction. They are interstate. Most operate in states like Nebraska and New Jersey where the usury laws are weakest. The usury laws within Texas are actually fairer than most. If you get a high interest payday loan in Texas, the transaction is actually made in another state.

#26 | Posted by docnjo at 2019-07-25 02:45 AM | Reply

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