Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Saturday, August 03, 2019

The rigorous work schedule and pressure faced by U.S. doctors have them "stressed to the point of breaking" and struggling with the highest suicide rates among any profession in the U.S., Dr. Edward Ellison, executive medical director and chairman at the Southern California Permanente Medical Group, said Tuesday at CNBC's Healthy Returns conference in New York. Studies estimate that a doctor dies by suicide every day in the United States, Ellison said.

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Give your doctors a break ...

- stop sticking things in your butt
- read the directions on your medicine
- don't try to use your doctor as a drug dispenser

Also, eat less and move more.

Stop smoking and drink less.

Don't fall.

You're welcome.

#1 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-03 01:38 AM | Reply

Time to push out 22
For the docs!

#2 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2019-08-03 12:20 PM | Reply

Front page on the MIGHTY Drudge Retort !

woot, Woot, WOOT !

This is an important story that deserves more attention.

All health care systems are stressed to the max, in terms of patient workload, due to the overall aging of the population.

So as America dysfunctionly debates healthcare (decade after decade) it's important to know and understand that the by-product of our giant, crappy, wasteful, and harmful, U.S. Healthcare system ... is physician burnout.

And the estimated 90,000 shortage of doctors by 2025 is only going to make the situation worse.

#3 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-03 12:56 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"So as America dysfunctionly debates healthcare (decade after decade) it's important to know and understand that the by-product of our giant, crappy, wasteful, and harmful, U.S. Healthcare system ... is physician burnout."

You nailed it.

One thing we need to do ,in my opinion, is to make these Med-Schools less elitist and less super expensive. I really think we could train a lot more doctors if wanted to.

#4 | Posted by shane at 2019-08-03 01:19 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Physicians Assistant is the new frontline doctor. RN's do all the work.

#5 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2019-08-03 01:56 PM | Reply

Physicians Assistant is the new frontline doctor. RN's do all the work.

#5 | POSTED BY SHEEPLESCHISM

Just the same, they're all overworked.

#6 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-03 02:14 PM | Reply

The purpose of our health care system is to make money for the insurance companies, the drug companies, managed hospital and clinics, and for all private practices. Same with law practices. Looking at your practice as a business whose purpose is to maximize profits puts the national health and justice on the back burner.

The ideal model is six patients an hour in which you prescribe a drug regardless what the patient came in for. There is now a pill for everything whether real or driven by TV ads inducing imaginary diagnosis. It goes so far as to provide paid vacations for doctors that prescribe medications in high enough volumes, leading directly to the opioid epidemic killing ~65,000 per year. Next opioids will be underprescribed.

#7 | Posted by bayviking at 2019-08-03 02:57 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

If you cant take the heat, get out of the kitchen.

#8 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2019-08-04 05:42 AM | Reply

I could tell you stories, but your brain won't let you see them to save your mind from pain.

Keep fighting guys. There will be casualties.

I do my part, as little as it is. I didn't ask for this, it was handed to me. But I know what to do with it now that I understand.

Give blood, and keep blood between brothers. www.youtube.com

#9 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2019-08-04 05:51 AM | Reply

*Stupid Freud

#10 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2019-08-04 05:55 AM | Reply

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Work Stress Pushes Some Doctors to Suicide

Admittedly doctors are under a lot of stress; that's why they get paid the big bucks.

More needs to be done to increase the number of nurse practitioners and physician assistants to relieve some of the patient load and therefore, some of the stress. However, that costs money; money that will likely come from the pool of money used to pay doctors which would result in less pay for the doctors. If doctors are unwilling to trade stress for money, then they are stuck with the stress.

#11 | Posted by FedUpWithPols at 2019-08-04 07:14 AM | Reply

I recently had the unfortunate experience of a close loved one in the hospital. The doctors worked 12 hour shifts and were spread so thin, you'd be lucky to hear from them 3 hours after you asked to. This article doesn't surprise me in the least. As long as healthcare is a capitalist enterprise, hospitals will only hire just enough doctors to insulate themselves from malpractice lawsuits.

#12 | Posted by JOE at 2019-08-04 08:11 AM | Reply

If you cant take the heat, get out of the kitchen.

#8 | POSTED BY HELIUMRAT

Healthcare is the most knowledge intense and technology advanced endeavour humans have ever done, and that's just the medicine ...

For a physician to be completely updated on the latest medical news and best practices, they'd have to read hundreds of peer reviewed articles in our nation's medical journals EVERYDAY.

knowledgeplus.nejm.org

In 1950, doctors in practice could expect the total amount of medical knowledge to double every 50 years.

By 2020, it will take just 73 days.


Deliverying healthcare is just as complicated.

Here's a great 6 minute video from Cracked.com that has a doctor explaining what doctors are up against ... youtu.be

#13 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-04 09:32 AM | Reply

As someone in the field the last 20+ years I would put my stressors as follows:

(1) Docs are mostly employed these days and it is a tough place to be in. There's a profound loss of independence although you're the first one responsible if the proverbial crapola hits the fan. I have never had a malpractice case (humble brag alert!) but it's still always lurks in the background.

(2) Most of my difficult patient encounters take place with a small percentage of my patient panel (maybe 1-2%). However, in a system focused on pleasing people if you're not making 100% of them happy, you've got a problem. This has created a lot of stress where I want to do the right thing but feel pressure knowing the patient will probably complain if I do.

(3) Patient panels are insane. Where I work there is no limit to the amount of patients you can get on your panel. No limit! I'm in my third year at this job and still see 2 or more new patients per day. I've given up keeping track. The virtual patient care is one of the biggest burn outs of my job.

(4) The knowledge gap alluded to by Pinchaloaf is very valid. It's amazing in my field (primary care) how much this has exploded. I spend the equivalent of 1 workweek yearly in CME.

(5) Workload has been squeezed by efficiency experts to get you to bill the maximum while seeing the most patients you can per day. I'm under the gun because I insist most of my geriatric patients get 40 minute visits and it lowers my productivity. Many doctors see an excess of 20 patients per day and I can't see how you can deliver quality care like that.

#14 | Posted by zarnon at 2019-08-04 09:49 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

The ideal model is six patients an hour in which you prescribe a drug regardless what the patient came in for. There is now a pill for everything whether real or driven by TV ads inducing imaginary diagnosis. It goes so far as to provide paid vacations for doctors that prescribe medications in high enough volumes, leading directly to the opioid epidemic killing ~65,000 per year. Next opioids will be underprescribed.

The average patients per day seen in my profession, one of the busiest, is 19. Still high, but nowhere near 6 per hour.

There are plenty of diagnosis where a medication, even if available, wouldn't be appropriate. I can think of dozens of examples but antibiotics for upper respiratory infections comes as an immediate one. I spend more time talking patients out of unnecessary antibiotics than the convenience of just writing the prescription. The CDC's own guidelines call for not prescribing antibiotics in the first 7 days for uncomplicated URI in nonsmokers. Patients drive a lot of this, wanting something convenient and quick.

I don't know what world you're talking about but my interactions with pharmaceutical reps have resulted in free pens and pizza or take out Chinese. The current place I work doesn't allow them in at all. There will always be bad actors in every profession, I'm sure someone got a kickback somewhere but this widespread large scale influence peddling is long past. I make the same paycheck whether I prescribe or not. If I'm getting a BigPharma (tm) check they sure have been slow about it.

#15 | Posted by zarnon at 2019-08-04 10:03 AM | Reply

News flash... ... ... ... ... .. Stress leads to most burnout and suicide.

#16 | Posted by Sniper at 2019-08-04 01:45 PM | Reply

Hi Sniper!

#17 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-04 01:58 PM | Reply

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