Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, August 06, 2019

For years, the United States' high health-care costs and poor outcomes have provoked hand-wringing, and rightly so: Every other high-income country in the world spends less than America does as a share of GDP, and surpasses us in most key health outcomes ... Recriminations tend to focus on how Americans pay for health care, and on our hospitals and physicians. But lost in these discussions is, well, us. We ought to consider the possibility that if we exported Americans to those other countries, their systems might end up with our costs and outcomes. Could the problem with the American health-care system lie not only with the American system but with American patients?

Advertisement

More

Comments

Admin's note: Participants in this discussion must follow the site's moderation policy. Profanity will be filtered. Abusive conduct is not allowed.

Per the article ...

Most experts agree that American patients are frequently overtreated, especially with regard to expensive tests that aren't strictly needed. The standard explanation for this is that doctors and hospitals promote these tests to keep their income high. This notion likely contains some truth.

But another big factor is patient preference. A study out of Johns Hopkins's medical school found doctors' two most common explanations for overtreatment to be patient demand and fear of malpractice suits -- another particularly American concern.

In countless situations, such as blood tests that are mildly out of the normal range, the standard of care is "watchful waiting." But compared with patients elsewhere, American patients are more likely to push their doctors to treat rather than watch and wait.

American patients similarly don't like to be told that unexplained symptoms aren't ominous enough to merit tests.

Robert Joseph, a longtime ob‑gyn at three Boston-area hospital systems who last year became a medical director at a firm that runs clinical trials, says some of his patients used to come in demanding laparoscopic surgery to investigate abdominal pain that would almost certainly have gone away on its own. "I told them about the risks of the surgery, but I couldn't talk them out of it, and if I refused, my liability was huge," he says.

Hospitals might question non-indicated and expensive surgeries, he adds, but saying the patient insisted is sometimes enough to close the case. Joseph, like many American doctors, also worried about getting a bad review from a patient who didn't want to hear "no." Such frustrations were a big reason he stopped practicing, he says.

In most of the world, what the doctor says still goes. "Doctors are more deified in other countries; patients follow orders," says Josef Woodman, the CEO of Patients Beyond Borders, a consulting firm that researches international health care. He contrasts this with the attitude of his grown children in the U.S.: "They don't trust doctors as far as they can throw them."

American patients' flagrant disregard for routine care is another problem.

Take the failure to stick to prescribed drugs, one more bad behavior in which American patients lead the world. The estimated per capita cost of drug noncompliance is up to three times as high in the U.S. as in the European Union. And when Americans go to the doctor, they are more likely than people in other countries to head to expensive specialists.

Finally, the U.S. stands out as a place where death, even for the very aged, tends to be fought tooth and nail, and not cheaply.


Welcome to the United States of Dysfunction.

#1 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-06 09:01 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

Front page on the MIGHTY Drudge Retort ~

woot, Woot, WOOT !!!

This is an important story that deserves more attention.

People can complain about the rising costs of healthcare, but they also have to learn that their behavior contributes to the mess.

#2 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-06 10:44 AM | Reply

And when Americans go to the doctor, they are more likely than people in other countries to head to expensive specialists.

#1 | POSTED BY PINCHALOAF AT 2019-08-06 09:01 AM | FLAG:

Wait times in Canada are currently 20 weeks for specialists, if one is available for that need in the first place. Their waits have more than doubled in the last 15 years and by 2030 will approach year long waits at current trends.

#3 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2019-08-06 10:54 AM | Reply

Wait times in Canada are currently 20 weeks for specialists, if one is available for that need in the first place. Their waits have more than doubled in the last 15 years and by 2030 will approach year long waits at current trends.

#3 | POSTED BY SITZKRIEG

The important caveat that needs to be mentioned is that not all consultations with specialist doctors are necessary ...

Again, approximately one-third of all healthcare in America is waste with no benefit to patients, close to 1$ trillion annually of waste in the US Healthcare System.

As this article points out, Americans over consume healthcare services exponentially, which drives up costs.

#4 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-06 11:05 AM | Reply

The medical system is not designed to cure patients in the sense of restoring patients to full health. It's designed to alleviate symptoms, thereby keeping patients chronically dependent on medication ans surgery. That, in a nutshell is why the costs of healthcare are out of control.

#5 | Posted by Ray at 2019-08-06 11:07 AM | Reply

Much of the blame leveed on patients can be at least partially attributed to the barrage of big pharma advertising we get bombarded with every day.

#6 | Posted by MUSTANG at 2019-08-06 11:11 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 4

"That, in a nutshell is why the costs of healthcare are out of control."

Riiiiiight.

Thank God it's not something more mundane, like....you know...supply and demand, or the aging of the baby boomer generation.

#7 | Posted by Danforth at 2019-08-06 11:14 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

#7 | POSTED BY DANFORTH

You're so predictable. All you are doing is following me around like a dog and barking at me.

#8 | Posted by Ray at 2019-08-06 11:29 AM | Reply

"All you are doing is following me around like a dog and barking at me."

Just tell us the day you realized Ray 1400 was a clueless idiot, and I'll let it go.

My fear is, that day never came. You're just here selling a different brand of snake-oil elixir, but it's all under the same banner:

YOU'RE BLIND, AND I'M A VISIONARY

Forgive me if I refuse to fall for that a second time.

Ray 1400 bleated about the imminent demise of the stock market. Please explain where that Ray was misguided, while Ray NoVax is a seer.

#9 | Posted by Danforth at 2019-08-06 11:34 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"You're so predictable."

Pointing out you're just as sure now as you were back then?

Yeah, right....predictable, especially after your worst-prognostication-ever history.

#10 | Posted by Danforth at 2019-08-06 11:36 AM | Reply

Advertisement

Advertisement

Okay, people are warming up to the very real problem of over utilization and over consumption of medical services -- good.

Now once again, here's a link I've posted numerous times that breaks down why the costs of healthcare continue to rise ...

Why are healthcare costs rising ... and what can be done about it?

[16:05 – 21:35]
youtu.be

1. Population growth and aging
2. Uncontrolled proliferation of technology
3. Increasing chronic care demands
4. Direct to consumer marketing of healthcare products and services
5. Restriction of managed care practices
6. Legislative healthcare mandates
7. Consolidation of healthcare providers
8. Rising liability insurance costs
9. Excessive demand ("Consumptive Society")

10. Care variation from best evidence (i.e. poor quality)

Everything bolded is prominently mentioned in the above Atlantic article.

#11 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-06 11:39 AM | Reply

#9 | POSTED BY DANFORTH

Woof! Woof!

#10 | POSTED BY DANFORTH

Woof! Woof!

#12 | Posted by Ray at 2019-08-06 11:50 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

Oh HELL NO!!! Did they just infer that personal responsibility is a problem? Oh no...Liberals are going to explode now. Imagine if they start releasing data on how bad we take care of our own health responsibilities and America will have a Hiroshima type explosion from all the Liberals' heads.

#13 | Posted by humtake at 2019-08-06 11:51 AM | Reply

"Woof! Woof!"

I'm hoping my barking will alert the readers: RAY 1400 AT THE DOOR! He still thinks he's the visionary, and now, instead of peddling gold, he's peddling NoVax.

Unless you can detail your epiphany, when you realized how misguided and NON-visionary you were, you're still the same snake-oil salesman, just with a different product line.

#14 | Posted by Danforth at 2019-08-06 12:01 PM | Reply

#13 | Posted by humtake

Why did you go there? Liberals? Seems to me Conservatives have just as much or more of a problem with "personal responsibility." Liberals create laws, rules and regulations because of Conservatives inability to take personal responsibility is the way I see it.

Besides did the article say people of one ideology or the other is worse? If you want to generalize, to me it's pretty obvious who actually takes better care of themselves in general. For example where is obesity most rampant? Red states... Just saying.

#15 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2019-08-06 12:04 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

9. Excessive demand ("Consumptive Society")

#11 | POSTED BY PINCHALOAF AT 2019-08-06 11:39 AM | REPLY

Go wait 20 weeks for a biopsy and see if you still feel that way.

#16 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2019-08-06 12:35 PM | Reply

I'm hoping my barking will alert the readers:
#14 | POSTED BY DANFORTH

Which is another way of saying that if it weren't for you, your fellow liberals are too stupid to decide for themselves.

#17 | Posted by Ray at 2019-08-06 01:42 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Yes patients are a problem but the problems go deeper. Why did patients become a part of the problem. The incessant advertising of things is a big part.

But for real, you guys bellyaching about the woes of socialized medicine - we already have them and worse. It took like 5 months for my mother's cancer treatment to start last year. 5 MONTHS TO START CANCER TREATMENT... And then a dragged out schedule mixed with another delay almost caused her to have to repeat the whole thing. Not on her end...

It's some serious BS out there. Insurance companies are a BIG part of the problem. My Dr wants me to get a stress test. I actually don't disagree with her and I was hesitant to bring up the issue because I knew she would want one and in reality it is a good thing for me to get. BUT she can't just order one because of insurance. I have to wait to see a cardiologist who will then order one and that means I have to see him again for results and then see her again. So I have to wait a month and a half to see the cardiologist and probably another month for the stress test and hey if you have a heart attack in the mean time... HOW IS THAT EFFICIENT AND LEADS TO GOOD OUTCOMES?

It is also very true that Doctors are afraid to deny tests for fear of liability law suits. If the Insurance companies had a sack they would back the doctors up instead of settling. The "settle" mentality is a big issue.

In all honesty when I saw my Doctor last week she came right out and said "I never thought I would be for single payer insurance but in the past two years things have changed so radically and the Insurance companies have things so screwed up it is the only solution." She operates her own practice with her husband - i.e. some "health network"/hospital doesn't own their practice.

#18 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2019-08-06 01:55 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"Which is another way of saying that if it weren't for you, your fellow liberals are too stupid to decide for themselves."

One never knows who might be reading. Someone might choose not to vaccinate their kids because of your irresponsible blather.

Bogus posturing about gold and an imminent apocalypse is one thing. Malinformation about vaccines is dangerous. God help anyone swayed by your snake-oil elixir.

#19 | Posted by Danforth at 2019-08-06 01:59 PM | Reply

Bogus posturing about gold and an imminent apocalypse is one thing.

I've been promoting gold and silver for a very long time. That's were I put my savings. Imminent apocalypse? I don't think so. No apocalypse. Just a good old fashioned economic depression.

Malinformation about vaccines is dangerous.

In a free country, we do what we think is right. If vaccines weren't mandatory, we wouldn't be having this discussion. Trust in politicians is dangerous.

#20 | Posted by Ray at 2019-08-06 02:15 PM | Reply

"Imminent apocalypse? I don't think so."

You were predicting it so often, I specifically nailed you down on a date. You were certain it would be by later that year, or definitely by the next year. No surprise...nothing happened.

"No apocalypse. Just a good old fashioned economic depression."

Which you were predicting at Dow 6600.

"If vaccines weren't mandatory, we wouldn't be having this discussion."

Your mouth to God's ears.

"Trust in politicians is dangerous."

Medical malinformation is much, much mores.

#21 | Posted by Danforth at 2019-08-06 02:26 PM | Reply

No surprise...nothing happened.

The banking bailout made a world of difference.

Medical malinformation is much, much mores.

We have differences of opinion on what constitutes medical misinformation. It's no big deal to me. You get crazy about it.

#22 | Posted by Ray at 2019-08-06 02:32 PM | Reply

I get it about advertisers. Yes, the number of medicines advertised is crazy. It's like toy commercials starting in October for Christmas, but its year round.

Listen to the side effects! Makes you need more meds.

But, I have a choice. Advertisements, no matter how many, don't make me buy anything. If I can tell the kid no, then the adult has to say it to themselves.

I also agree that over medicating can be patient caused. My doc told me the stuff could be addicting. Take as prescribed. Don't take more. Stop taking it when its not needed. If worsens or stays the same, contact her...dont take more!

#23 | Posted by Petrous at 2019-08-06 02:37 PM | Reply

"It's no big deal to me."

Because you're not putting YOURSELF at risk.

"You get crazy about it."

Because you're putting OTHERS at risk.

#24 | Posted by Danforth at 2019-08-06 02:38 PM | Reply

Because you're not putting YOURSELF at risk.

It's been an ongoing learning experience for fifty years. I don't get sick because I know how our body works.

Because you're putting OTHERS at risk.

Believe what you want to believe. Playing watchdog with me is getting you nowhere.

The idea of bypassing the immune system with substances foreign to our bodies strikes me as risky.

You wouldn't think of putting leaded gasoline in a modern car. It's the say way with vaccines.

Colds and flu are common during the winter months because of the lack of sunlight. Our skin is what leaves are to plants. It makes Vitamin D from sunlight. If you want to be healthy, it's not something you should ignore.

#25 | Posted by Ray at 2019-08-06 02:57 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

Go wait 20 weeks for a biopsy and see if you still feel that way.

#16 | POSTED BY SITZKRIEG

Dr. Kizer explains it pretty well in the you-tube link in post #11.

Why did it wait 20 weeks to get a biopsy result?

• too many unnecessary biopsies

• too much of everything else, which bogs downs the healthcare system as a whole

And, patients demanding the tests while doctors reacting to those demands by practicing defensive medicine is why costs continue to rise.

If everyone lived like an American, how many planet Earths would we need again?

#26 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-06 03:01 PM | Reply

"In a free country, we do what we think is right. If driving on the right hand side of the road weren't mandatory, we wouldn't be having this discussion. Trust in politicians is dangerous."

That about sum things up for you, Ray?

#27 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-08-06 03:08 PM | Reply

But, I have a choice. Advertisements, no matter how many, don't make me buy anything. If I can tell the kid no, then the adult has to say it to themselves.

That's why they spend billions on them, because advertising doesn't make people buy anything.

#28 | Posted by Nixon at 2019-08-06 03:16 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

"You wouldn't think of putting leaded gasoline in a modern car. It's the say way with vaccines."

Vaccines are only for old people?
You must be well overdue then.

#29 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-08-06 03:17 PM | Reply

ray thinks sunlight cures polio, apparently.

dumb. ass.

#30 | Posted by Alexandrite at 2019-08-06 03:17 PM | Reply

"In a free country, we do what we think is right. If driving on the right hand side of the road weren't mandatory, we wouldn't be having this discussion. Trust in politicians is dangerous."
That about sum things up for you, Ray?
#27 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

F politicians. When everybody drives on the right, the right thing to do is drive on the right.

#31 | Posted by Ray at 2019-08-06 03:19 PM | Reply

Vaccines are only for old people?
You must be well overdue then.
#29 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

True story.

My father was about 90 at the time. When I learned that vaccines are dangerous to the elderly, I warned him not to get a flu vaccine. The elderly immune system can't handle the stress. He let his doctor vaccinate him anyway. A week later, he was hospitalized with pneumonia.

#32 | Posted by Ray at 2019-08-06 03:27 PM | Reply

ray thinks sunlight cures polio, apparently.
dumb. ass.
#30 | POSTED BY ALEXANDRITE

Straw man.

#33 | Posted by Ray at 2019-08-06 03:30 PM | Reply

Interesting article, thanks for posting. People do like to point the blame on someone else, when they themselves (we, I) must shoulder at least some of the blame now and then.

#34 | Posted by cbob at 2019-08-06 03:48 PM | Reply

"My father was about 90 at the time. When I learned that vaccines are dangerous to the elderly, I warned him not to get a flu vaccine. The elderly immune system can't handle the stress. He let his doctor vaccinate him anyway. A week later, he was hospitalized with pneumonia."

Well, that proves it! A 90yr old man got pneumonia, and by crackie, it wuz the GUB'MINT, and they danged VACK-SCENES!

#35 | Posted by Danforth at 2019-08-06 03:51 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

"Straw man."

That's not a "straw man", Ray. You were literally touting sunshine and orange juice over medical care when you first returned here.

#36 | Posted by Danforth at 2019-08-06 03:52 PM | Reply

"F politicians. When everybody drives on the right, the right thing to do is drive on the right."

Then you are a sheep, blindly following the herd.

#37 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-08-06 04:26 PM | Reply

#35 | POSTED BY DANFORTH
#36 | POSTED BY DANFORTH

Woof Woof Arf Arf Grrr Grrr.

#38 | Posted by Ray at 2019-08-06 04:36 PM | Reply

Then you are a sheep, blindly following the herd.
#37 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

So you drive on the left side of the road against traffic. It figures a lefty would do that.

#39 | Posted by Ray at 2019-08-06 04:43 PM | Reply

No, Ray. I follow the herd, just like you.

#40 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-08-06 04:46 PM | Reply

No, Ray. I follow the herd, just like you.
#40 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

Certainly not this herd.

That's not a "straw man", Ray. You were literally touting sunshine and orange juice over medical care when you first returned here.
#36 | POSTED BY DANFORTH

You're a bale of hay. It makes such good sense to learn about health and practice it so you don't have to seek medical care. If you do nothing. Then sure, you should plan on needing medical attention eventually.

#41 | Posted by Ray at 2019-08-06 05:13 PM | Reply

"You're a bale of hay."

You've proven you don't know what a straw man is: it's making something up out of whole cloth, to attack it. That is NOT what happened here: instead, you were called on the carpet for how smugly wrong you were back then, and how it's absolutely beyond you to consider you could be smugly wrong again.

NOT a straw man, by any stretch of the definition. You were literally touting sunshine and orange juice over medical care.

#42 | Posted by Danforth at 2019-08-06 05:27 PM | Reply

^mores = moreso

Damned auto-correct.

#43 | Posted by Danforth at 2019-08-06 05:29 PM | Reply

You were literally touting sunshine and orange juice over medical care.
#42 | POSTED BY DANFORTH

You have a habit of making stuff up. I said nothing about orange juice. It's junk food.
The fact that our skin makes Vitamin D from sunshine should tell you how important sun is to our bodies. Vitamin D is actually a hormone used in every cell of our body. It affects our moods, our immune system and our bone structure among other things.

My post in #41 is perfectly sensible. Disease is preventable. That's what fifty years experience told me.

If you want to trash everything I say, it's your health. Not my problem.

#44 | Posted by Ray at 2019-08-06 06:15 PM | Reply

The practice of non-essential procedures and particularly invasive surgeries props up the costs astronomically. What amazes me is how insurance companies will permit this but not give essential care for the most needy.

Insurance companies are to blame for the majority of deaths related to lack of care.

Pharmaceutical companies are to blame for the majority of deaths related to prescriptions.

Physicians are in the middle preventing litigation and staying clear of non-regulated methodologies regardless their benefit to their patients.

The health "care" system is designed to create a death spiral of costs and repercussions.

#45 | Posted by redlightrobot at 2019-08-06 08:04 PM | Reply

Interesting article, thanks for posting. People do like to point the blame on someone else, when they themselves (we, I) must shoulder at least some of the blame now and then.

#34 | POSTED BY CBOB

You, or anyone, shouldn't beat themselves up too badly on reading an article like this then taking inventory on one's behavior with their doctor or lack of a healthy lifestyle.

Case in point, from the article ...

Somava Saha, a Boston-area physician who for more than 15 years practiced primary-care medicine and is now a vice president at the nonprofit Institute for Healthcare Improvement, told me that several unhealthy behaviors common among Americans (for example, a sedentary lifestyle) are partly rooted in cultural norms.

Having worked on health-care projects around the world, she has concluded that a key motivator for healthy behavior is feeling integrated in a community where that behavior is commonplace.

And sure enough, healthy community norms are particularly evident in certain places with strong outcome-to-cost ratios, like Sweden.

Americans, with our relatively weak sense of community, are harder to influence.

"We tend to see health as something that policy making or health-care systems ought to do for us," she explained.

To address the problem, Saha fostered health-boosting relationships within patient communities. She notes that patients in groups like these have been shown to have significantly better outcomes for an array of conditions, including diabetes and depression, than similar patients not in groups.


Just look we're marketed to, how our cities are structured, how our elected political leaders never tell Americans the truth about healthcare ...

Glad you found the article interesting and useful!

#46 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-06 08:32 PM | Reply

My mom is one of those worst patients in the world.

#47 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2019-08-06 08:35 PM | Reply

Why did it wait 20 weeks to get a biopsy result?
• too many unnecessary biopsies

#26 | POSTED BY PINCHALOAF AT 2019-08-06 03:01 PM | REPLY

Lack of specialists. In the US you get a biopsy fast. This is the first time I've heard somebody come out AGAINST early cancer detection.

#48 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2019-08-06 08:50 PM | Reply

Lack of specialists. In the US you get a biopsy fast. This is the first time I've heard somebody come out AGAINST early cancer detection.

#48 | POSTED BY SITZKRIEG

You have it backwards.

America has too many specialist doctors, and not enough primary care doctors.

We Have Too Many Specialists and Too Few General Practitioners
www.huffpost.com

And I'm not against early detection of cancer. Like everthing the devil is always in details. And in the case of prostate cancer, there are too many biopsies ...

Study finds more than 40 percent of prostate biopsies could be avoided with new blood test
m.medicalxpress.com

The Atlantic article at the top of this thread also makes mention on the American mindest about wanting costly aggressive care for cancer when less expensive "watchful waiting" produces better outcomes in other countries ...

In countless situations, such as blood tests that are mildly out of the normal range, the standard of care is "watchful waiting."

But compared with patients elsewhere, American patients are more likely to push their doctors to treat rather than watch and wait.

A study published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine suggested that American men with low-risk prostate cancer -- the sort that usually doesn't cause much trouble if left alone -- tend to push for treatments that may have serious side effects while failing to improve outcomes.

In most other countries, leaving such cancers alone is not the exception but the rule.


Again, there's too much of everything, including specialist doctors are and biopsies.

#49 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-06 09:31 PM | Reply

Why did it wait 20 weeks to get a biopsy result?
• too many unnecessary biopsies
#26 | POSTED BY PINCHALOAF AT 2019-08-06 03:01 PM | REPLY
Lack of specialists. In the US you get a biopsy fast. This is the first time I've heard somebody come out AGAINST early cancer detection.
#48 | POSTED BY SITZKRIEG AT 2019-08-06 08:50 PM

Like squeezing a tumor for the mammogram? That is one obvious problem that becomes a plethora of tumorous growths elsewhere.

I'm not against early "detection", but certainly question the rationale when it's proven to cause more damage. Change your methodologies, but also hatred for women and misuse of breast cancer "awareness" campaigns are both weaponized in their orthodoxy. That needs to end.

#50 | Posted by redlightrobot at 2019-08-06 09:53 PM | Reply

#48 | POSTED BY SITZKRIEG

Too much ...

Too many US physicians over-recommend mammography
www.radiologybusiness.com

Advanced breast imaging technique reduces unnecessary biopsies by more than a third
www.healthimaging.com

... of everything.

#51 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-06 10:39 PM | Reply

#3 i would love only a 20 week wait. I work at a dortune 500 company. I have great insurance. I am currentl waiting for a CONSULTATION at the sleep center to get a sleep study scheduled to see if i have sleep apnea. Once i get the consultation it will be 4-5 months before the actual sleep study. I had my annual physical a few weeks ago. Doc said im due for a colonoscopy. He put the order in. Now i am waiting for the GI people to call and schedule it. The waits are so far out it may be 2-3 minths before i get the call to SCHEDULE it.

Waiting times? USA has its fair share too

#52 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-08-07 03:55 AM | Reply

Waiting times? USA has its fair share too

#52 | Posted by hatter5183

I hear ya. The first available appointment for a routine, elective diagnostic test I had this year was 5 months out. But if my doctor thought there was a problem, I'd have gotten in quickly.

Many on the right bash Canada's or the UK's or France's health care systems, but friends who live there LOVE them. And no one waits for MRIs or other tests if they're determined to be needed ASAP. Anyone who says so is lying.

#53 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY at 2019-08-07 04:19 AM | Reply

Your Responsibilities as a Patient
www.verywellhealth.com

Maintaining Healthy Habits

Being Respectful to Providers

Being Honest With Providers

Complying With Treatment Plans

Preparing for Emergencies

Reading Behind the Headlines

Making Decisions Responsibly

Understanding Prescription Drugs and Their Possible Effects

Meeting Financial Obligations

Reporting Fraud and Wrongdoing

Avoiding Putting Others at Risk


Personal responsibility, what a concept ~

#54 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-07 08:46 AM | Reply

As this article points out, Americans over consume healthcare services exponentially, which drives up costs.
#4 | POSTED BY PINCHALOAF

Agree.
The ERs are overrun with medicaiders that have snotty noses.

#55 | Posted by phesterOBoyle at 2019-08-07 08:51 AM | Reply

I'm not against early "detection", but certainly question the rationale when it's proven to cause more damage.

#50 | POSTED BY REDLIGHTROBOT AT 2019-08-06 09:53 PM | FLAG:

You have a mole turn a color, you go to a doctor, they refer you to a dermatologist. It's going to be biopsied. How long do you want to wait, a week, or 20 weeks? You're never going to convince people it's better to wait 20 weeks.

#56 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2019-08-07 09:05 AM | Reply

Much of the blame leveed on patients can be at least partially attributed to the barrage of big pharma advertising we get bombarded with every day.

#6 | POSTED BY MUSTANG

No way. I've been told that advertising doesn't work and that the advertiser must directly interfere with the process, otherwise it's a hoax.

#57 | Posted by jpw at 2019-08-07 09:05 AM | Reply

You're never going to convince people it's better to wait 20 weeks.

#56 | POSTED BY SITZKRIEG AT 2019-08-07 09:05 AM | REPLY |

Botttom line Canada has better outcomes than USA. What they are doing works better. They live longer than us and have lower infant mortality rates. Of 191 Countries we are not #1 we are not even close. We are # 37 and Canada is #30

#58 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-08-07 09:17 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

I agree with some of the sentiments in this article although they are by far only part of the health care issue in this country.

Our basic American attitude appears to be "Don't tell me what to do! I'll do what I want!"
For some, when the wheels start to fall off they listen, for many others it's adherence to their same unhealthy standard of living.
Then it's "Fix me!" usually with as little discomfort or work experienced by the patient. Again, some at this stage listen, a good chunk do not.
When the "fixin'" doesn't work because of zero patient compliance the attitude changes to "Take care of me!". Knee replacements, scooters, home health PT and disability all become "my right!".

And there you have it, the lack of personal responsibility circle.

In the patients where I know their politics it doesn't appear being left or right wing influences it although would love to see the study.

#59 | Posted by zarnon at 2019-08-07 09:37 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Disease is preventable. That's what fifty years experience told me.

While diet, lifestyle play a role in health. There are some things (like genetic disease and certain cancers) that are largely out of the control of the patient.

It really depends on what you're talking about. Some are obvious (obesity, which for most people is a choice, not a metabolic or endocrine disease).

I preach smoking cessation, weight loss, low-glycemic diet every day. It's the rare person who will engage in preventative medicine but it's awesome when they do.

#60 | Posted by zarnon at 2019-08-07 09:52 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Botttom line Canada has better outcomes than USA. What they are doing works better.

#58 | POSTED BY HATTER5183 AT 2019-08-07 09:17 AM

Yeah, they border jump for specialists. You would too.

#61 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2019-08-07 03:49 PM | Reply

Yeah, they border jump for specialists. You would too.

#61 | POSTED BY SITZKRIEG

Your responses in this thread mirrors the exact same misplaced American "money is no object" attitude (and damn the consequences) toward their healthcare that is explained in the Atlantic article at the top of the thread.

Try the BMJ video at the top of the thread. It's a great 16-minute video about the dangers of over-treatment. You should check it out.

If the video isn't your cup of tea, then here's more evidence that Americans are being over-treated ...

New Study Raises Concerns About Overuse of Cardiac Stents
reachmd.com

Unnecessary Joint Replacements Cost Americans $8.3 Billion
www.drugwatch.com

Unnecessary Medical Care Is More Common Than You Think
www.propublica.org

Why So Much Of The Health Care We Deliver Is Unnecessary
www.forbes.com

U.S. doctors continue prescribing unnecessary drugs, survey says
www.upi.com

Why do surgeons continue to perform unnecessary surgery?
www.upi.com

Unnecessary medical tests, treatments cost $200 billion annually, cause harm
www.healthcarefinancenews.com

What more evidence do you want that demanding specialist based healthcare isn't always the answer?

#62 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-07 06:42 PM | Reply

I rarely go to the Doctors. Who wants to go to a Dr when they tell you that you're too fat and you need to lose weight. Who needs that kind of negativity in their lives??

#63 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2019-08-07 06:54 PM | Reply

True story.

My father was about 90 at the time. When I learned that vaccines are dangerous to the elderly, I warned him not to get a flu vaccine. The elderly immune system can't handle the stress. He let his doctor vaccinate him anyway. A week later, he was hospitalized with pneumonia.

#32 | POSTED BY RAY

Nope, not true ...

Why You May Still Get Sick After a Flu Shot

www.verywellhealth.com

Many of us have heard stories of people who still got sick even after getting a flu shot. Or perhaps you got the flu shot only to find yourself sick a few weeks later anyway.

It takes two weeks to develop immunity to influenza after you get the vaccine. If you get the flu within two weeks of getting the shot, you were probably exposed to the virus right before or right after you were vaccinated.

The flu shot does not protect against:

• The common cold

• Pneumonia (although it may protect you from pneumonia as a complication of the flu)

• Bronchitis

• Stomach flu

It is still possible -- and quite likely -- that you will get sick at some point during "flu season" with some other illness that you might mistake for the flu.

Just because you had a flu shot, that does not mean you will not get sick at all. You might have a similar illness that is caused by a virus other than influenza.


There you go -- you're welcome.

#64 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-08 02:40 AM | Reply

Your responses in this thread mirrors the exact same misplaced American "money is no object" attitude (and damn the consequences) toward their healthcare that is explained in the Atlantic article at the top of the thread.

#62 | POSTED BY PINCHALOAF AT 2019-08-07 06:42 PM | FLAG:

It's an object. One of the things you spend it on is healthcare.

Do you know why people with money maintain private insurance in every socialist medicine system? For quick access to specialists the plebes don't get.

#65 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2019-08-08 08:27 AM | Reply

Do you know why people with money maintain private insurance in every socialist medicine system? For quick access to specialists the plebes don't get.

#65 | POSTED BY SITZKRIEG

And all the evidence shows that having "premium health insurance" does not mean you'll get good healthcare.

So if rich people want that unneeded heart stent, then die of sepsis due to an HAI that they wouldn't have acquired if they had just listened to a doctor explain that "watchful waiting" was better -- speaks for itself.

#66 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-08-08 08:54 AM | Reply

Comments are closed for this entry.

Home | Breaking News | Comments | User Blogs | Stats | Back Page | RSS Feed | RSS Spec | DMCA Compliance | Privacy | Copyright 2019 World Readable

Drudge Retort