Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, September 03, 2019

Over the course of seven years, from 2006 to 2012, two pharmacies in rural northeast Louisiana, owned by Republican gubernatorial candidate and U.S. Rep. Ralph Abraham, Clinic Pharmacy of Mangham and Adams Clinic Pharmacy of Winnsboro, doled out 1,478,236 doses of powerful opioids, according to a Drug Enforcement Administration database recently published by the Washington Post.

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Over the course of seven years, from 2006 to 2012, two pharmacies in rural northeast Louisiana, owned by Republican gubernatorial candidate and U.S. Rep. Ralph Abraham, Clinic Pharmacy of Mangham and Adams Clinic Pharmacy of Winnsboro, doled out 1,478,236 doses of powerful opioids, according to a Drug Enforcement Administration database recently published by the Washington Post.

If Abernathy can get the dotard enough Adderall he could be the next czar.

#1 | Posted by reinheitsgebot at 2019-09-02 09:56 PM | Reply

*Abraham*

#2 | Posted by reinheitsgebot at 2019-09-02 09:56 PM | Reply

Well I wasn't there that day when those medications were legally sold. And anyway--Hillary, Gays, background checks, God bless Trump, and Nick Saban is the Devil!
--A certain congressman hoping to talk his way out of abetting the death of hundreds who crossed his threshold

#3 | Posted by catdog at 2019-09-03 09:02 AM | Reply

This is an example of how to use statistics wrong

The number of doses prescribed is over a 7 year period. A person on long term pain meds taking the minimum doses takes 4 a day 365 days a year. 4x365x7 is 10,220 doses. People with nerve damage like my wife need more. She takes what is counted as 6 doses 4 times a day everyday. It does not eliminate her pain or make her high. It is the regimen the doctors at Mayo Clinic figured out during almost 2 years as a patient at their phoenix location after 6 years of trying everything else. She takes 61,320 doses in a 12 year period. 1,478,236 is only enough to treat 24 people like my wife or 144 people with long term pain on the minimum dose. Passing more laws to make it harder for my wife to get the medss she needs is not going to prevent even one heroin overdose. Prescription opioids are not the gateway to heroin. preventing people who are in pain and need opioids is the driving factor. LET THE DOCTORS DECIDE THE APPROPRIATE TREATMENT, NOT POLITICIANS AND STATISTICIANS WHO DON'T KNOW WHAT THE NUMBERS MEAN. My wife's pain management doctor is leaving medicine because he is treated like a drug dealer for DOING HIS JOB. So now she faces going through all the excruciating pain she did in the 6 years before mayo because pain management doctors are afraid to prescribe the medicines that work for her

#4 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-09-03 11:22 AM | Reply

Lock Him Up!

#5 | Posted by donnerboy at 2019-09-03 12:18 PM | Reply

That's dope.

#6 | Posted by SunTzuMeow at 2019-09-03 12:20 PM | Reply

My daughter ditched opioids almost immediately after major surgery and relied on marijauna for pain relief. That doctor in the article belongs in prison not the Governor's mansion. And then his opposition to marijauna just adds more to his shame, the families of people whose loved ones died taking the pills he sold should have 24 hours unlimited punishment for his sorry ass.

#7 | Posted by danni at 2019-09-03 12:57 PM | Reply

"My wife's pain management doctor is leaving medicine because he is treated like a drug dealer for DOING HIS JOB."

Because too many of them are drug dealers. Sorry your wife's doctor is labeled like that if he is a responsible doctor but I saw the big bottles of opioids my daughter's doctor prescribed for her, fortunately she had enough sense not to take them but her doctor's prescriptions were ridiculous.

#8 | Posted by danni at 2019-09-03 01:00 PM | Reply

the families of people whose loved ones died taking the pills he sold should have 24 hours unlimited punishment for his sorry ass.

#7 | POSTED BY DANNI AT 2019-09-03 12:57 PM |

Virtually all of the overdoses are from people using illicit drugs where they have no way to know how strong it is until they are passed out waiting to die from it or people using prescription drugs that were prescribed for someone else and sold illegally or stolen.

Very few overdoses involve people using medications that were prescribed to them for legitimate reasons but those people are the only ones effected by the new laws. Then what happens is people in pain who can't get pain meds from their doctors are pushed to heroin which is cheap and readily available

#9 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-09-03 01:17 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

Well my daddy worked in the coal mine
Till the company shut it down
Then he sat around and drank hisself blind
Till we put him back underground
Now nothin' grows on this mountain
And what's a poor boy to do?
Except to wander these hills forgotten
With the Oxycontin blues

Well I never cared much for whiskey
'Cause it only made daddy mean
Wrapped a little bit tight they tell me
For the methamphetamine
Then my cousin come up from Knoxville
And he taught me a thing or two
Now I'm headed nowhere but downhill
With the Oxycontin blues

Got a dollar bill in my pocket
Got a half a tank in my truck
I'm gonna go and pawn grandma's locket
Hell, maybe it'll change my luck
Ain't nothin gonna be right no how
'Cause I know I can't ever lose
This devil that's draggin' me down
And the Oxycontin blues

--Steve Earle, "Oxycontin Blues"

#10 | Posted by catdog at 2019-09-03 01:29 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

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Because too many of them are drug dealers. Sorry your wife's doctor is labeled like that if he is a responsible doctor but I saw the big bottles of opioids my daughter's doctor prescribed for her, fortunately she had enough sense not to take them but her doctor's prescriptions were ridiculous.

#8 | POSTED BY DANNI AT 2019-09-03 01:00 PM | REPLY |

I have personally had major surgeries several times and have never been prescribed bottles of opioids. Usually they give 5 pills. recovery time after surgery is not the source of prescriptions. chronic pain is. I don't care about overdoses and misuse if the only solution you can come up with is forcing my wife to endure permanent excruciating pain and the inability to do anything other than lay in bed. Opiods allow her to run a small business and have a normal life.

The current political climate is focused on saving the people who deliberately misuse and overprescribe and telling people like my wife to shut up and die quickly

#11 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-09-03 01:51 PM | Reply

Punish the people who are doing wrong, the new laws don't punish them at all. They only affect people like my wife.

If the doctor is overprescribing he needs to be sanctioned. The thing is you cannot look at a number of doses and see if a doctor is overprescribing. My wife tried every alternative under the sun including many "alternative" treatments. She spent 6 years with pain so bad she could not control her bodily functions and movement. She had pain induced hallucinations and seizures. Opioids are the only thing that worked. Now she has built a successful business and is likely going to have to shut it down because they are going to make her start over at square one.

Did you like seeing your daughter in pain? That was a little hurt. I have endured that kind of pain several times. It goes away after a few days. My wife has a damaged spinal column. Barring a major breakthrough it will NEVER stop hurting. Because of hysteria and misplaced action I am being forced to prepare for what may be 6-8 YEARS of watching my wife endure unimaginable pain

#12 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-09-03 02:21 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

All pain patients should have access to opioids.. but not all are needed.
My doctor told me I could have all the pills I need due to bad back and neuropathy... all I had to do was quit using Marijuana and submit to regular testing... I told them to get bent....
Taking away my way of dealing with all my other symptoms in order to be a slave to his pills.
I told him if it gets bad enough.. Portland is full of cheap heroin... never tried but have no problem using it it that's my only way of avoiding becoming a slave to my doctor's whims or restrictions.

#13 | Posted by 503jc69 at 2019-09-03 04:06 PM | Reply

Can they document if anyone died using medications he prescribed?

Can they even document if any of those meds were overprescribed to even one patient? The industry standard is that one doctor can have 2500 patients. If that doctor is a pain management specialist then 1.5 million doses over 7 years is only an average of 85 doses per patient or enough for 21 days at minimum dosage. A pain specialist with 20 patients like my wife would prescribe 1,226,400 doses over 7 years JUST TO THOSE 20 PATIENTS. according to the National Spinal Cord Injury Association about 450,000 people have permanent spinal injuries in the USA.

#14 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-09-03 04:18 PM | Reply

"1,478,236 doses of powerful opioids"

After Iran-Contra, nobody should be surprised that Republicans are drug dealers.

#15 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-09-03 04:28 PM | Reply

hatter5183 - read the article. It isn't just about the number of pills. It's about the population of the area (6000) the INCREASE in the prescriptions over time, how it ranks in the state, etc.

As for most people ODing on Illicit drugs - I agree that basic fact is probably correct. But it's also true but their wasn't an opioid problem in this country until the massive push of opioids actually got people hooked. THEN the illicit drugs came pouring in. I'm not saying that there aren't people like your wife that actually need them but their was a HUGE push in the late 90s and early 00s by manufacturers along with the lies like they aren't addictive...

Nobody likes to be in pain. I am sitting here right now with a fair amount of it. If I had not even chronic pain but a little worse pain and a doctor told me a non-addictive pain killer would kill the pain...

#16 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2019-09-04 09:28 AM | Reply

hatter5183 - read the article. It isn't just about the number of pills. It's about the population of the area (6000) the INCREASE in the prescriptions over time, how it ranks in the state, etc.

Nobody likes to be in pain. I am sitting here right now with a fair amount of it. If I had not even chronic pain but a little worse pain and a doctor told me a non-addictive pain killer would kill the pain...

#16 | POSTED BY GALAXIEPETE AT 2019-09-04 09:28 AM | REPLY |

the population of the area is irrelevant. Only the number of patients is. If the towns are built around an industry that has high back injury rates a town of 200 could have more pain patients than a town of 6000. The AMA says the average patient load in the USA is 1900 patients per doctor. Pain specialists have patients who are in pain. Yes he prescribes way more than an average GP but that is what pain management requires. This is like getting mad at orthopedic surgeons because they do hip replacement surgery way more often than a GP.

If you invent a non-addictive pain killer that is even 1/10th as effective against pain as opioids you would be a billionaire in a few weeks. There is NOTHING that reduces the kind of pain my wife has other than opioids. We spent 8 years trying every other option. It isn't just chronic pain. It is pain at a level that causes seizures and hallucinations. Your pain is minor. You are able to type on this blog. For the kind of pain I am talking about writing is impossible.

Do you think it is possible and reasonable that a pain management specialist with 1900 patients might have 20 like my wife? That is all it would take to account for the presecriptions. People with cancer are often prescribed fentanyl patches. The lowest strength fentanyl patch delivers 12 mcg/hr. 1 mcg of fentayl counts as 2.4 opioid doses. One cancer patient on the lowest strength fentanyl patch gets 28.8 doses of opioids PER HOUR. Fentanyl patches are for long term severe pain. Someone on the minimum strength fentanyl patch for 6 months gets 124,416 opioid doses. Do you think it is unusual for a pain management doctor to have 10 or 12 cancer patients?

What I am trying to get at is that without going through all of his patients charts there is no way to look at statistics and say whether he is overprescribing or not. There is also no way to just legislate less prescriptions without risking cutting off people who legitimately need opioids from being able to treat their pain

#17 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-09-04 10:37 AM | Reply

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