Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Monday, September 09, 2019

The former deputy director's FBI coddled Clinton and addled Trump. Now he seeks clemency ... even as he sues the Justice Department.

Hillary Clinton checked every box for a violation of the Espionage Act. So much so that, in giving her a pass, the FBI figured it better couch her conduct as "extremely careless," rather than "grossly negligent." The latter description was stricken from an earlier draft of then-director James Comey's remarks because it is, verbatim, the mental state the statute requires for a felony conviction. It wouldn't do to have an "exoneration" statement read like a felony indictment.

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I interrupt this program of non-stop Trump bashing for some good old fashioned Obama administration bashing.

Have a nice day!

#1 | Posted by JeffJ at 2019-09-09 12:44 PM | Reply | Funny: 2

FTA:

In point of fact, the careless/negligent semantic game was a sideshow. Mrs. Clinton's unlawful storage and transmission of classified information had been patently willful. In contemptuous violation of government standards, which she was bound not only to honor but to enforce as secretary of state, she systematically conducted her government business by private email, via a laughably unsecure homebrew server set-up. Her Obama administration allies stress that it was not her purpose to harm national security, but that was beside the point. The crime was mishandling classified information, and she committed it. And even if motive had mattered (it didn't), her purpose was to conceal the interplay between her State Department and the Clinton Foundation, and to avoid generating a paper trail as she prepared to run for president. No, that's not as bad as trying to do national-security harm, but it's condemnable all the same.
While Clinton's mishandling of classified information got all the attention, it was just the tip of the felony iceberg. Thousands of the 33,000 emails she withheld and undertook to "bleach bit" into oblivion related to State Department business. It is a felony to misappropriate even a single government record. The destruction of the emails, moreover, occurred after a House Committee investigating the Benghazi massacre issued subpoenas and preservation directives to Clinton's State Department and Clinton herself. If Andrew Weissmann and the rest of the Mueller probe pit-bulls had half as solid an obstruction case against Donald Trump, the president would by now have been impeached, removed, and indicted.

And this:

fficials.
As we noted a few days ago, the FBI and Mueller's investigators prosecuted George Papadopoulos for lying about the date of a meeting. Though the lie was inconsequential to the probe, they made the then-28-year-old eat a felony charge. And while they could easily have had his lawyer surrender him for processing on the charge and quick release on bail, they instead choreographed an utterly unnecessary nighttime arrest that forced him to spend a night in jail.
Suffice it to say that Paul Combetta did not get the Papadopoulos brass-knuckles treatment.
Combetta was not prosecuted even though he brazenly lied to the FBI about the circumstances of his destruction of Clinton's private emails. He was the key witness who had been in communication with Clinton confederates before and after his bleach-bit blitz through Clinton's emails. In a normal case, prosecutors would charge him with obstruction and false statements to pressure him into cooperating. In the Clinton caper, though, he was given immunity . . . and duly clammed up.
No false-statements charges against Combetta. No false-statements charges against Cheryl Mills and Huma Abedin, intimate Clinton aides who claimed not to know about Clinton's private server while they worked for her at the State Department " even though emails show them involved in discussions about the server.

There are plenty more examples - the embedded piece really does cut to the bone. These 2 that I reproduced gives a flavor for what is in the embedded piece.

#2 | Posted by JeffJ at 2019-09-09 12:49 PM | Reply

One more for good measure:

Again, in a better world, I'd prefer to take account of the considerable positive side of McCabe's ledger and what he's already suffered, especially if he exhibited some contrition. That is, I'd ordinarily be open to declining prosecution. But then, how about the positive side of General Flynn's ledger? And why, if it would be overkill to charge McCabe was it not overkill to charge Papadopoulos? Why do Clinton, Mills, Abedin, and Combetta get a pass in a criminal investigation triggered by actual crimes, but Flynn, Papadopoulos, van der Zwaan, and Stone get hammered in an investigation predicated by no crime " just a fever dream of Trump-Russia cyberespionage conspiracy?

#3 | Posted by JeffJ at 2019-09-09 12:52 PM | Reply

The Heavily Politicized Obama DOJ

"I never thought I could miss Eric Holder, yet here we are." - quote by Tom Nichols, U.S. Naval War College University Professor and noted conservative commentator

#4 | Posted by Hans at 2019-09-09 12:59 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"I never thought I could miss Eric Holder, yet here we are." - quote by Tom Nichols, U.S. Naval War College University Professor and noted conservative commentator
#4 | POSTED BY HANS AT 2019-09-09 12:59 PM | REPLY | FLAG:

I kind of felt that way when Sessions was AG. Man, was he feckless.

#5 | Posted by JeffJ at 2019-09-09 01:08 PM | Reply | Funny: 1 | Newsworthy 1

"No, that's not as bad as trying to do national-security harm"

Clinton didn't try to do national security harm?

Mens rea (/mnz ri'/; Law Latin for "guilty mind") is the mental element of a person's intention to commit a crime; or knowledge that one's action or lack of action would cause a crime to be committed. It is a necessary element of many crimes. en.wikipedia.org

#6 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-09-09 01:54 PM | Reply

There's Jeff again deflecting to Obama to protect Trump. Oh hum more of the same.

#7 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2019-09-09 02:33 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

"Mens rea (/mnz ri'/; Law Latin for "guilty mind") is the mental element of a person's intention to commit a crime; or knowledge that one's action or lack of action would cause a crime to be committed. It is a necessary element of many crimes. en.wikipedia.org
#6 | POSTED BY SNOOFY "

Intent is not in the statute under which she was "investigated".

#8 | Posted by iragoldberg at 2019-09-09 07:49 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

#5 | POSTED BY JEFFJ

Sessions seems like the type of guy that the Deep State would have peeing hooker (male) tapes on for blackmail.

I think people should start to ask why he lobbied for the AG spot given he knew he would recuse on the Russia investigation AND he had a lifelong safe seat in the senate. Now, I don't think he would get elected dog catcher. So, why was he willing to destroy his reputation?

I should also state that I think all prosecutors are mentally unstable. They either have a ------ for power like a rogue cop or they are sociopathic in search of career advancement. Don't care if they are a D or R - Gawdy, Sessions, Spitzer, Holder, Klobuchar, etc - all are mentally unstable.

#9 | Posted by iragoldberg at 2019-09-09 07:55 PM | Reply

#2 Plenty more examples of lies more doubt.

Clinton was Totally exonarated after testifying under oath for many hours.

Flynn and other criminals in the Trump campaign committed real crimes and lied to the FBI.

They got off easy.

#10 | Posted by bored at 2019-09-10 05:27 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

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