Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Sunday, September 15, 2019

The capitalist economic system has major failures. It generates extreme, socially divisive inequalities of wealth and income. It consistently fails to achieve full employment. Many of its jobs are boring, dangerous and/or mind-numbing.

Every four to seven years, it suffers a mysterious downdraft in which millions of people lose jobs and incomes, businesses collapse, falling tax revenues undermine public services, and so on.

If these failures were widely perceived as the inherent failures of the capitalist system, the desirability and thus sustainability of capitalism itself might vanish.

How, then, has capitalism survived?

Its persistence can best be explained in terms of ideology. The system produces and disseminates interpretations of its failures that blame these problems not on capitalism itself, but on other altogether different "causes."

Institutions have developed mechanisms to anchor such interpretations widely and deeply in the popular consciousness.

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From the article ...

Meritocracy and the educational system's key place within it are important because capitalism's survival depends on them.

The merit system organizes how individual employees interpret the unemployment they suffer, the job they hate, the wage or salary they find so insufficient, the creativity their job stifles, and so on.

It starts as schools train individuals to accept the grades assigned to them as measures of individual academic merit. That prepares them to accept their jobs and incomes as, likewise, measures of their individual productive merit. Under this framework, unequal grades, jobs and income can all be seen as appropriate and fair: Rewards are supposedly proportional to one's individual merit.

This paradigm leaves little room for any systemic criticism. Inadequate educations are not blamed on an inadequate educational system unable or unwilling to fund high-quality mass schooling.

Unemployment, bad jobs and insufficient incomes are not blamed on the capitalist economic system. Had they been so blamed, both systems could well have come under criticism and opposition and died off long ago.

Meritocracy redirects the blame for capitalism's failures onto its victims. Schools teach meritocracy, and grading is the method.


I don't see this sort of thing ever being talked about, an educational system without grades.

#1 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-09-15 10:33 PM | Reply

Here's an you-tube comment ...


2 days ago

One of the big reasons I stopped teaching. Not many people talk about it, but Dr. Wolff hits the target.


Anyone want to take a stab at this?

#2 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-09-15 10:34 PM | Reply

Working hard has it's rewards, as it should. Slackers get no pity from me.

I've earned my pay, my position, my career. I worked my ass off for it. It has payed off well.

#3 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2019-09-15 10:39 PM | Reply

This is seriously stupid s%#t. Anyone looking for Russians trying to undermine our republic should start with the sorts of pseudo-intellectuals writing this claptrap.

#4 | Posted by MUSTANG at 2019-09-15 10:45 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

I've earned my pay, my position, my career. I worked my ass off for it. It has payed off well.

#3 | POSTED BY SHEEPLESCHISM

How's that translated to your community?

Any blighted neighborhoods and pot-holed filled streets?

Any homeless people on the streets?

What if you ever have to go to your local ER -- will it be overcrowded with patients who's medical problems could've been dealt with in a more cost effective medical setting?

I also work my ass off -- and healthcare has unique problems ... www.nytimes.com ... that goes on top of the inefficiencies that are spelled out in the article and the video.

Just looking around and it's not hard to see the problems that could be addressed by de-emphasizing now corrosive effects of meritocracy ... drudge.com ... and rote memorizing, and re-emphasizing a more tailored approach to each students so they become better future employees and better citizens.

#5 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-09-15 10:58 PM | Reply

an educational system without grades.

Without some form of "grading" is it really an education system?

Even UC Santa Cruz has a grading system.

Schools teach meritocracy, and grading is the method.

I wish this was true ...
www.insidehighered.com

#6 | Posted by AndreaMackris at 2019-09-15 10:59 PM | Reply

I also work my ass off -

Why?

and healthcare has unique problems

If there was no "meritocracy" do you think doctors/nurses/caregivers would be better or worse?

#7 | Posted by AndreaMackris at 2019-09-15 11:01 PM | Reply

Capitalist jobs can be boring, dangerous, mind numbing? Wouldn't those same jobs be just as bad under any other system?

#8 | Posted by Charliecharles at 2019-09-15 11:11 PM | Reply

Why?

If there was no "meritocracy" do you think doctors/nurses/caregivers would be better or worse?

#7 | POSTED BY ANDREAMACKRIS

It's thru-put.

Experts say that about 30% of what is done in healthcare is waste with no benefit to patients.

Number of patients and comorbidities are rising, yet the number of doctors and nurses are declining -- that's a capitalism problem of not addressing the bottlenecks with all stakeholders (doctors, politicians, patients, communities) and coming up with new and innovative ways to deal with the inefficiencies.

Yes, I'm not in the private sector, but the same problems I face are the same problems in private healthcare -- and all clinical modalities be it physicians or nurses are trained the same way.

#9 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2019-09-15 11:19 PM | Reply

"Anyone looking for Russians trying to undermine our republic should start with the sorts of pseudo-intellectuals writing this claptrap."

LOL.

This is about the failures of Capitalism, and you want to blame the Russians.

#10 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-09-15 11:23 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

If so many talented people didn't graduate from college with tens of hundreds of thousands of dollars, we could attract far more of the best and brightest to our school systems rather than seeing them have to choose the private sector simply to pay off student debt.

In Germany, for instance, state university and college tuition is free. Their teachers earn about the same as U.S. teachers, but Germany spends an average of 60% less per-student with similar results in graduation rates, test scores, and those moving on to college. Germany has excellent vocational training for those who choose not to go to college. High school students begin part time apprenticeships before they graduate.

#11 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY at 2019-09-16 12:10 AM | Reply

...tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars (of debt).

#12 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY at 2019-09-16 12:12 AM | Reply

" we could attract far more of the best and brightest to our school systems rather than seeing them have to choose the private sector simply to pay off student debt."

The best and the brightest can figure out how to be successsful without going into massive debt. Otherwise, they couldn't be called very bright, could they?

#13 | Posted by goatman at 2019-09-16 12:16 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

In Germany, for instance, state university and college tuition is free.

If you can get in, only 30%, only 21%graduate.... but in the US everyone gets in, 44% graduate .....

Germany has excellent vocational training for those who choose not to go to college.

Its not a choice ..... they are weeded out based upon testing, aka Meritocracy.

#14 | Posted by AndreaMackris at 2019-09-16 12:41 AM | Reply

"Otherwise, they couldn't be called very bright, could they?"

We don't measure brightness by how much debt someone has taken out.

#15 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-09-16 12:42 AM | Reply

Heck, even Mitt Romney suggested to those just starting out in life, to take a $50,000 loan from your parents.

Trump, meanwhile, received a small loan of one million dollars from his father.

#16 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-09-16 12:43 AM | Reply

"We don't measure brightness by how much debt someone has taken out.

#15 | POSTED BY SNOOFY "

Speak for yourself, "we".

#17 | Posted by goatman at 2019-09-16 12:59 AM | Reply

I am.
But what I'm saying is in accord with what Trump, and Romney, and many others have said.
"We."

#18 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-09-16 01:01 AM | Reply

Trump, meanwhile, received a small loan of one million dollars from his father.

Posted by snoofy

Of course, now we know that was a lie too. Donald Trump was a millionaire by the time he was eight.

Trump's 'small' loan from his father was more like $60.7 million ($140 million in today's dollars)
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/10/02/trumps-small-loan-from-his-father-was-more-like-60point7-million-
nyt.html

Then the rest of the $413,000,000 his father gave him.

4 Ways Fred Trump Made Donald Trump and His Siblings Rich

(Citations provided for dummies)

#19 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY at 2019-09-16 01:48 AM | Reply

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