Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Friday, September 20, 2019

Six million people are in the path of Tropical Depression Imelda, a deadly and catastrophic storm. Thirteen counties in southeast Texas are officially disaster zones.

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Everything is bigger in Texas.

#1 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2019-09-19 09:23 PM | Reply

Yep. Just a couple of hour drive east of me. But as always, San Antonio won't get a drop.

#2 | Posted by goatman at 2019-09-19 09:25 PM | Reply

Just talked to my sister in Houston.

She had to drive through water up to her hood to get home. It was either that or abandon the car as she could t turn around and the street went from not flooded to flooded in a matter of blocks.

#3 | Posted by jpw at 2019-09-19 09:32 PM | Reply

Babbles is safe. Just talked to him.

#4 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2019-09-19 09:35 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

"She had to drive through water up to her hood to get home. It was either that or abandon the car as she could t turn around and the street went from not flooded to flooded in a matter of blocks.

#3 | POSTED BY JPW "

Good thing she had a snorkel kit installed.

#5 | Posted by goatman at 2019-09-19 09:46 PM | Reply

If they dont like floods they should move.

#6 | Posted by bored at 2019-09-19 11:29 PM | Reply

This is exactly what climate scientists predicted would happen.

Wetlands serve a purpose. Building over them is stupid.

Now they will ask the government to bail them out. Again.

#7 | Posted by Nixon at 2019-09-20 06:43 AM | Reply

We had wetlands across the road from my development.

It took developers 20 years to pay off enough politicians to let them build.

An all GOP town board voted to let them build 45 homes on them.

All 45 have standing water in their basements all year long and now the homes next to them sanitary sewers back up every hard rainfall.

#8 | Posted by Nixon at 2019-09-20 06:46 AM | Reply

In houston the flat plate "wetlands" that dont hold water because it's all a clay sheet get turned into retention ponds with good drainage.

Now why the county let people build inside an reservoir? Federal insurance lol

#9 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2019-09-20 07:45 AM | Reply

Increased incidents and severity of flooding is an illusion brought on by people not reading the only true sources of science - the Bible and trump's tweets.

---nulli---

#10 | Posted by kudzu at 2019-09-20 08:48 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

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#8 | Posted by Nixon, Basements in Houston? What are you smoking? The water table is about 4', in most of Houston. I have never seen one, and if some fool built one, they deserve what they got.

#11 | Posted by docnjo at 2019-09-20 08:56 AM | Reply

I don't think he's referring to Houston specifically. He's just raising the point that developing wetlands has predictable, bad consequences.

#12 | Posted by jpw at 2019-09-20 08:59 AM | Reply

The National Flood Insurance Program: Drowning in Debt and Due for Phase-out
June 22, 2017
Diane Katz

Senior Research Fellow in Regulatory Policy
Diane Katz, who has analyzed and written on public policy issues for more than two decades, is a research fellow in regulatory policy.

Summary
The federal government holds a monopoly on primary flood insurance for homeowners and businesses, and the program is debt-ridden and dysfunctional. A large proportion of the flood-risk maps are obsolete, and thus the premiums charged under the National Flood Insurance Program do not reflect actual risk. Because property owners do not bear the full cost of flood risk, they are more likely to locate in flood-prone areas and less likely to undertake preventive measures. The devastation of natural disasters is worsened as a result. Tinkering with operational reforms cannot remedy a program designed by Congress to be financially unsound. A private market in flood insurance is the ultimate solution.

#13 | Posted by nullifidian at 2019-09-20 09:23 AM | Reply

"Because property owners do not bear the full cost of flood risk, they are more likely to locate in flood-prone areas and less likely to undertake preventive measures. The devastation of natural disasters is worsened as a result."

And then owners rebuild in the same flood prone areas thanks to the taxpayers in other states. It's stupid.

#14 | Posted by nullifidian at 2019-09-20 09:29 AM | Reply

#14 | Posted by nullifidian It's pretty stupid to build a home on a coast anywhere on the gulf or southern coast but people still do. I did notice that many of the new replacement homes are built on peers 20 foot above the ground now or they are using old barges as foundations,(they float). As far as Texas goes, it is flat as a pancake along the coast. Every heavy rain causes flooding somewhere. BTW Houston is 12 miles inland.

#15 | Posted by docnjo at 2019-09-20 03:15 PM | Reply

" I did notice that many of the new replacement homes are built on peers 20 foot above the ground"

Almost all homes I see around the Gulf on the beach from Texas to Florida are built on piers. In Florida (and perhaps other places) homes are built to spec to withstand hurricanes. My sister lives about 2 miles inland in Melbourne, and her house is built to withstand a Cat 4. Studs are built into the frame of the house around windos so that plywood can be quickly attached. The plywood, with predrilled holes, came with the house.

#16 | Posted by goatman at 2019-09-20 03:24 PM | Reply

#16 | Posted by goatman, Those precautions would do very little if a wall of water 15 feet high came in on the tidal surge.

#17 | Posted by docnjo at 2019-09-20 03:29 PM | Reply

"#16 | Posted by goatman, Those precautions would do very little if a wall of water 15 feet high came in on the tidal surge.

#17 | POSTED BY DOCNJO "

Galveston knows. 16' in 1900. 6,000 dead in the worst loss of life in a natural disaster in US history.

But that is extremely rare and you get down to cost vs benefit and risk.

#18 | Posted by goatman at 2019-09-20 03:35 PM | Reply

Houston doesn't do zoning or planning for the city like many places do. They don't have regulations for land use.

This is the result. There is no planning to handle rising water like most places.

So while most cities have developed with drainage in place to cope with heavy rains, Houston screams "Freedom!" as they get into their boats.

I'm afraid its only going to get worse for Houston as time goes on.

#19 | Posted by Sycophant at 2019-09-20 03:51 PM | Reply

"There is no planning to handle rising water like most places.

POSTED BY SYCOPHANT "

Houston is just a few feet above sea level. How does one plan for flooding? What have other cities built in places like Houston done to plan for flooding? Levees surrounding the city? See: New Orleans/Katrina.

#20 | Posted by goatman at 2019-09-20 03:57 PM | Reply

"How does one plan for flooding?"

By throwing money at it.

INSIDE TEXAS' REVAMPED STATEWIDE FLOOD MITIGATION PLAN
It's a wishlist of projects with an overarching goal of mitigating flooding across the most disaster-prone state in the nation
psmag.com

#21 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-09-20 04:04 PM | Reply

As far as Texas goes, it is flat as a pancake along the coast. Every heavy rain causes flooding somewhere. BTW Houston is 12 miles inland.

#15 | POSTED BY DOCNJO

Not like this. I went through several tropical systems and heavy rain events and while it was normal for some streets (usually predictable which ones) to flood out there was never any "water rescues" of people from their homes.

And the land south of Houston that's being developed is supposed to be marshland. The fields we hunted dove in were rice fields in years past.

www.google.com

#22 | Posted by jpw at 2019-09-20 04:18 PM | Reply

So while most cities have developed with drainage in place to cope with heavy rains, Houston screams "Freedom!" as they get into their boats.

#19 | POSTED BY SYCOPHANT AT 2019-09-20 03:51 PM | FLAG:

Not quite. You've read too many articles written as shallow hit pieces by people that aren't from Houston and apparently can't read a map. About 2.7 million people live in Houston. The other 4.3 million live in the "metro area".

It's kind of right. Houston itself doesn't have zoning laws. The Democrats that run Houston do some hilarious things. When you go for jury duty, the court buildings are in excess of 20 stories in a 9 square plaza grid with 1 way streets. They put the jury center in the plaza in that center grid... underground... in a flood plain. Why underground? Double-whammy. Mandatory green space on top of it. Developers bankroll the mayor and city council. On the flip side, their policies for high density growth both mitigate damage from common ground level flooding, but create vast amounts of housing growth.

The cities that make up Harris county that surround Houston, in many case are actually inside Houston city limits but their own stand-alone city, most of those have zoning. They're also mostly run by Republicans. Even the extremely red City of Katy, with its all Republican city council, the Western suburb of Houston, has extensive zoning regs.

#23 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2019-09-20 04:48 PM | Reply

Global Climate Change is a real bitch.
You think Mother Nature is trying to send a wake up call to the MAGA morons?

#24 | Posted by aborted_monson at 2019-09-20 05:28 PM | Reply

#24 | Posted by aborted_monson Oh get over yourself, Houston has a hurricane every 5 to 10 years on average. Galveston has as many. They literally lifted the entire city of Galveston 8 foot and built a sea wall around the whole city to prevent the replete of the big disaster. Long before federal aide.

#25 | Posted by docnjo at 2019-09-22 11:16 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

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