Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Thursday, October 17, 2019

American, British and South Korean officials announced at a news briefing here on Wednesday that they have busted one of the world's largest child sexual exploitation networks. An analysis of a server, seized by South Korean authorities, revealed that the website had more than one million bitcoin addresses, signifying that the website had a capacity for at least one million users. The operation led to the rescue of at least 23 minor victims residing in the United States, Spain and the United Kingdom, who were being actively abused by the users of the site.

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The internet-based child pornographic network was the world's "largest child sexual exploitation market by volume of content", said US Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard Downing.

Officials said at the news briefing that hundreds of suspects had been charged worldwide for their alleged involvement with "the largest darknet child pornography website", funded by Bitcoin.

In Washington, a federal grand jury indicted a South Korean national " Jong Woo Son, 23 " for operating the website called "Welcome to Video".

Authorities have also arrested 337 other users in the US states of Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington State and Washington, DC.

Some of the suspects were arrested in the United Kingdom, South Korea, Germany, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, the Czech Republic, Canada, Ireland, Spain, Brazil and Australia.

The operation resulted in the seizure of approximately eight terabytes of child sexual exploitation videos, which is one of the largest seizures of its kind.

#1 | Posted by J_Tremain at 2019-10-17 02:27 AM | Reply

Some thoughts on this:

An analysis of a server, seized by South Korean authorities, revealed that the website had more than one million bitcoin addresses, signifying that the website had a capacity for at least one million users.

One million. Wonder where all that bitcoin is going to go now that it has been seized?

One million. Just imagine if it was one million people. Notice that one million people haven't been arrested.

My moral of the story...

A good chunk of those 337 people probably had vpn's and were using TOR. But they still got caught.

The other one million people behind those bitcoin addresses will not get caught, because block chain is still decentralized and almost impossible to trace.

#2 | Posted by boaz at 2019-10-17 08:58 AM | Reply

People get caught because they repeat a set of behaviours over and over. And because payments were involved, the chances of getting sloppy rose exponentially.

#3 | Posted by J_Tremain at 2019-10-17 11:37 AM | Reply

^^^ People get caught because they

want to or fantasize about diddling kids.

#4 | Posted by fresno500 at 2019-10-17 05:56 PM | Reply

#2 They were caught by looking at the blockchain.

IRS-CI was able to trace bitcoin transactions on the site to people all over the world who were uploading and downloading this material, as well as find the location of the site administrator. By analyzing the blockchain and de-anonymizing bitcoin transactions, the agency was able to identify hundreds of predators around the world - even though those users thought that they could remain anonymous.

Distributed blockchains are public. Being distributed does nothing to protect the identity of the transactions, it just makes it easy to access the records without a warrent. The identity of the address owners is anonymized, but can be discovered.

I never understood by blockchain users think they are anonymous.

#5 | Posted by bored at 2019-10-17 09:29 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

by = why

#6 | Posted by bored at 2019-10-17 09:29 PM | Reply

"by = why

#6 | POSTED BY BORED "

You say good why, and I say bello.

Sorry, but that post screamed, "Spoonerise me."

#7 | Posted by goatman at 2019-10-17 09:31 PM | Reply

I never understood by (why) blockchain users think they are anonymous.

I never understood it either.

The whole point of a blockchain is to verify a transaction took place. And if it can be verified, the parties involved in that transaction should also be identifiable in some manner after some effort.

#8 | Posted by J_Tremain at 2019-10-18 02:06 AM | Reply

#8 The point of a blockchain is to have immutable transactions approved (digitally signed) by the participants. Many are also are distributed (public), where the transactions are accepted by the network not a central authority. Many allow transaction participants to use anonymous addresses/wallets.
But to remain anonymous you have to do several things:
buy bitcoin with cash anonymously (not easy)
and never reuse an address for multiple transactions with others (a pain)
and ideally use a scrambling service to obscure the chain of transactions (a huge pain).

The other myth about blockchain is that it is trustless. In fact you have to trust the distributed (or central) authority(ies) and the network code.

#9 | Posted by bored at 2019-10-18 04:15 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

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