Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Adidas plans to close high-tech "robot" factories in Germany and the United States that it launched to bring production closer to customers, saying Monday that deploying some of the technology in Asia would be "more economic and flexible."

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They're making a ------ real-life Gundam!!! www.youtube.com

#1 | Posted by hamburglar at 2019-11-11 08:00 PM | Reply

Poor homeless robots on street corners begging for some charge and a shot of hydraulic fluid...

#2 | Posted by grumpy_too at 2019-11-11 08:33 PM | Reply

Free junk yards will furnished.
~liz

#3 | Posted by phesterOBoyle at 2019-11-12 08:20 AM | Reply

So the price of shoes will go down?

#4 | Posted by BruceBanner at 2019-11-12 09:59 AM | Reply

There is no minimum wage low enough to stop the onward march of automation. Automation is not replacing just low wage jobs, it is the forefront of technology. Those Stem jobs everyone is preparing for can all be done by a computer. We are in the 6th generation of computers designed by computers. Cloud means instead of building a brick and mortar datacenter and buyin equipment and cooling and power and licensing and support people that can cost millions of dollars per year a company can build a virtual datacenter for 1/10th the cost and let Amazon or Google worry about the physical maintenance.

#5 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-11-12 10:00 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 4

Location Location Location....

#6 | Posted by AndreaMackris at 2019-11-12 10:09 AM | Reply

I think we should continue to argue that it's "the right" or "the left" policy that is causing American human job losses while our robot overlords take over.

#7 | Posted by hamburglar at 2019-11-12 10:10 AM | Reply

According to "Megatrends", 1969 was the year in which the US economy tipped from a manufacturing economy to a service economy. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 8.5% of the American workforce is employed in manufacturing. Granted, those jobs usually pay more than service jobs, but your typical manufacturing worker has some college and strong math skills, so as to run a complicated machine tool. One reason American manufacturing continues to wither is the lack of educated workers who can perform the job.

Funny--nobody hears anything about Trump pressing for more money for better schools, so as to train the manufacturing workers of tomorrow...

#8 | Posted by catdog at 2019-11-12 10:13 AM | Reply

Once upon a time in America you could walk into a company with no experience and get hired, trained and become part of the company. The success of the employee and the success of the company went hand in hand and the companies took care of their workers. At some point the thinking changed. Instead of an integral part of the company workers are now viewed as a cost center to be minimized in any way possible. The companies expect the worker to arrive fully trained and ready to work at their first day on the job. The employee owes the "job creator" for ALLOWING them to do the work that the "job creator" needs done.

#9 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-11-12 04:12 PM | Reply

Funny--nobody hears anything about Trump pressing for more money for better schools, so as to train the manufacturing workers of tomorrow...

#8 | POSTED BY CATDOG AT 2019-11-12 10:13 AM | FLAG:

The genius of it was to convince them to hate education first. Then they took away education. Last, they made them servants. The servants had no choice but to believe their master, Trump, so they pretend to think without knowing how to.

#10 | Posted by BruceBanner at 2019-11-12 06:40 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

Cloud means instead of building a brick and mortar datacenter and buyin equipment and cooling and power and licensing and support people that can cost millions of dollars per year a company can build a virtual datacenter for 1/10th the cost and let Amazon or Google worry about the physical maintenance.

#5 | Posted by hatter5183

I disagree with what you just posted there. It is NOT cheaper for everyone and it is absolutely not 1/10th the cost for anyone. You don't shed licensing or support people either (unless you mean building maintenance...) There are absolutely places it makes sense but just for example, I have been trying to justify an ROI for my team on this for years. Here and there it makes sense but running the numbers I get it actually costs us in actual dollars roughly twice as much to move our infrastructure to the cloud.

#11 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2019-11-13 12:59 PM | Reply

We have to buy licensing for every physical switch, server OS, fiber port, router, controller, etc. The TCO on a fully populated cisco 48 port 9k switch is about $20K per year. Spin up 48 servers in AWS and I don't have to pay a nickel for the switch they connect to. A single Dell Pizza box server costs about $10K and then you have to build space and pay heating and cooling costs and you have to buy the OS and software and install it and so patching and code upgrades which require work. It also has to be large enough to handle the maximum load for the apps on it even though most of the time it will run at 1/4th-1/10th of that load. I can spin up the same server in AWS and I don't have to have space for it in my building or pay electric and cooling. I can spin up a large server in AWS for $35/month which comes to $420/year.

calculator.s3.amazonaws.com

#12 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-11-13 03:22 PM | Reply

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