Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Wednesday, November 13, 2019

The United States government violated the Fourth Amendment with its suspicionless searches of international travelers' phones and laptops, a federal court ruled today.

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"The United States government violated the Fourth Amendment with its suspicionless searches of international travelers' phones and laptops"

Hell yes.

#1 | Posted by sentinel at 2019-11-12 08:49 PM | Reply

Good. The surveillance state is out of control and needs to be reined in.

#2 | Posted by JeffJ at 2019-11-13 10:00 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

I always thought that by logging out of social networking, turning off browser synch, uninstalling sensitive apps and clearing data would make my phone pass through.
Afterwards, bringing back apps and logging back in makes everything normal again.

#3 | Posted by LesWit at 2019-11-14 01:50 AM | Reply

#3 And if you shine the officer's boots while you're down there maybe he won't beat you.

#4 | Posted by qcp at 2019-11-14 09:10 AM | Reply

#2 | Posted by JeffJ

Until the constitutional conservatives on the SCOTUS step in and rule in favor of the police state.

#5 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2019-11-14 01:04 PM | Reply

Judge: US Cannot Search Phones for No Good Reason

At first glance, sounds like common sense... but then...

Has the judge / federal court also defined or renumerated what constitutes said "good reason" or left that to the good graces of the federal / state governments?

Does the "government" need to ask the "court" each and every time for permission to search the phone (i.e., "warrant") or are there circumstances where "warrantless search" may be warranted?

Or is the title misleading?

#6 | Posted by CutiePie at 2019-11-15 07:24 AM | Reply

Does Fourth Amendment apply to international or intercontinental travelers who are non-citizens?

Does this decision apply only to phones, laptops and other digital gadgets, or can we finally stop having to take off the shoes at the airport's security check points or take a bottle of water to the airplane? Or having shoes on and/or bottle of water is automatically suspicious?

#7 | Posted by CutiePie at 2019-11-15 07:36 AM | Reply

Does Fourth Amendment apply to international or intercontinental travelers who are non-citizens?

According to the 14th Amendment, Constitutional protections apply to all persons (and I do believe that travelers are all "persons") within U.S. Territory and under the. Execeptions exist for people whose allegiance is to another country, e.g., diplomats, foreign government officials, and therefore not "under the jurisdiction" of the US.

"...No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws".

#8 | Posted by WhoDaMan at 2019-11-15 08:57 PM | Reply

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