Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Thursday, December 26, 2019

When very massive stars get close to the end of their lives, they start varying by tremendous amounts, and do so with significant irregularity. At a critical moment, most of these stars will run out of the nuclear fuel holding up their cores against collapse, and the resulting implosion leads to a runaway cataclysm: a core-collapse supernova. Could Betelgeuse, whose variability intensified in a novel way over the last few days, be about to explode?

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You thin that's bad? Read about Eta Carinae. Bam. And it's only 7,500 ly away. You know what's going to happen when that thing blows? Kiss all life in the galaxy good-bye.

#1 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2019-12-26 03:00 PM | Reply

I'm not worried about it.

I think it would be cool to see a super nova that's visible to the naked eye.

#2 | Posted by jpw at 2019-12-26 03:08 PM | Reply

It's Showtime!

#3 | Posted by 6thPersona at 2019-12-26 04:51 PM | Reply

Beetlejuice, Beetlejuice, BEETLEJUICE!
See!? Nothing to worry about!
...
GAAAAHHHHHHHH!
*urkkk*

#4 | Posted by e1g1 at 2019-12-26 09:05 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

Could Betelgeuse, whose variability intensified in a novel way over the last few days, be about to explode?

Well I supposed it would have exploded already, about the time Robert the Bruce was King of Scotland.

#5 | Posted by REDIAL at 2019-12-26 09:29 PM | Reply

You thin that's bad? Read about Eta Carinae. Bam. And it's only 7,500 ly away. You know what's going to happen when that thing blows? Kiss all life in the galaxy good-bye.

#1 | POSTED BY HELIUMRAT AT 2019-12-26 03:00 PM |
There are nebulae from supernovas as close as 700 light years and all life in the galaxy just got a pretty light show. Leave science to people who can read more than 140 characters at a time

#6 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-12-26 10:27 PM | Reply

Could have already exploded hundreds of years ago:

about 600 years
Betelgeuse is about 600 light years away from our solar system, so the light traveling from Betelgeuse has about 600 years of travel before it will reach us. If the star had physically exploded in 2015, we wouldn't spot the light from that explosion until 2615.Feb 24, 2015
Astroquizzical: What happens when Betelgeuse explodes?
medium.com starts-with-a-bang astroquizzical-what-happens-whe...<>

#7 | Posted by MSgt at 2019-12-26 11:47 PM | Reply

#6 You know old the galaxy is, right? The black hole at Sagittarius A* is a direct collapse black hole from the big bang, from before Transparency and before the Stelliferous Era. And ordinary nebula from ordinary supernova are pretty normal. Ours is a third generation star. Now look at Eta Carinae. That's called a supermassive.

#8 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2019-12-27 10:05 AM | Reply

That's called a supermassive.

#8 | POSTED BY HELIUMRAT AT 2019-12-27 10:05 AM |

That's irrelevant. The energy in a supernova is huge, yes, but it is spread evenly across an expanding sphere. The energy dissipates by the square of distance from the center. at 1 light year from the explosion the energy strength is 1/34,562,641,000,000,000,000,000,000th of what it was at 1 mile from the explosion.

#9 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-12-27 10:46 AM | Reply

About Eta Cariae
----------------

Eta Carinae ( Carinae, abbreviated to Car), formerly known as Eta Argus, is a stellar system containing at least two stars with a combined luminosity greater than five million times that of the Sun, located around 7,500 light-years (2,300 parsecs) distant in the constellation Carina.

And it's unstable and about blow.

en.wikipedia.org

#10 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2019-12-27 11:15 AM | Reply

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Also, you're a dork.

#11 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2019-12-27 11:16 AM | Reply

"This is the only star known to produce ultraviolet laser emission." dork.

From now on, you shall be known to me as "dork".

#12 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2019-12-27 11:23 AM | Reply

#12

From Ork?

#13 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2019-12-27 11:39 AM | Reply

#13 LFTHNDTHRDS

Brother to Mork?

#14 | Posted by 6thPersona at 2019-12-27 12:07 PM | Reply

And it's unstable and about blow.

Which will make for a good show and little more.

It's too far away for a gamma ray burst or other radiation to have a significant effect on Earth, which would be mostly protected by the atmosphere and magnetosphere anyway.

It says so right in your own link.

#15 | Posted by jpw at 2019-12-27 12:11 PM | Reply

#15 Yeah, it was nice to have an atmosphere before it got stripped away. You know there is no other star like this in the Milky Way right? And it's next door. And it hates us.

#16 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2019-12-27 12:51 PM | Reply

I don't know about Betelgeuse, but I'll bet Rigel did when rcade put him in jail last week.

(For the astronomically challenged, that was a joke. Both are in the constellation Orion)

#17 | Posted by goatman at 2019-12-27 12:58 PM | Reply

I've seen nothing saying it would strip away the atmosphere.

There seems to be plenty that it will have little to no effect, much heavily leaning towards the no effect.

#18 | Posted by jpw at 2019-12-27 01:07 PM | Reply

There is no possible way the Earth would be affected. The radiation would be far too weak and it will take over 6 million years for the "debris" to near Earth and even then oh, our son will repel it

So no need for hand wringing.

www.nationalgeographic.com

#19 | Posted by goatman at 2019-12-27 01:11 PM | Reply

Keep in mind if we are going to see it in our lifetime, it has already happened. Beetlegeuse would have novaed over 600 years ago, about 100 years before the time Richard III was being buried under what would later be a parking lot in London.

#20 | Posted by goatman at 2019-12-27 01:32 PM | Reply

#19 | Posted by goatman

Yeah. Like an an ultra-violet laser star agrees with you.

#21 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2019-12-27 02:38 PM | Reply

21 what is a laser star?

Lasers are a focused beam. Radiation from a star obeys the inverse square law, unlike lasers.

#22 | Posted by goatman at 2019-12-27 05:25 PM | Reply

what is a laser star?

I tried to look that up. Apparently there are a few stars that have natural laser generating properties but most roads lead to crazy people websites.

#23 | Posted by REDIAL at 2019-12-27 06:27 PM | Reply

23 I have heard of those and they are recently speculated. However from what I understand they involve very intense and concentrated magnetic and/or gravitational fields. A red giant contains neither.

Also, I don't think one has ever been observed and verified. To do so would mean that the star's "laser" would be directed exactly at Earth, of course. The odds against that are, well, astronomical.

#24 | Posted by goatman at 2019-12-27 06:37 PM | Reply

I figured it couldn't be possible for laser light to not obey the inverse square law, but it turns out apparently that's a common misconception, or not even wrong, depending on how you are thinking about things!

"Compared to the point source multiplier (0.25), it is easy to see why a laser spot is much more intense for the same amount of power. It is not because lasers don't follow the inverse square law. It is because the beam's directionality gives it a huge initial boost in intensity, after which it proceeds to fall off as the inverse of distance squared."
www.quora.com

#25 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-12-27 06:50 PM | Reply

#23 Oops. Now Canada knows about laser stars....

#26 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2019-12-27 08:39 PM | Reply

The question isn't whether or not a laser is immune from the inverse square law (of course it is) but whether a red giant can produce a laser. (It can't)

#27 | Posted by goatman at 2019-12-27 09:02 PM | Reply

"The question isn't whether or not a laser is immune from the inverse square law (of course it is)"

I love how you can't let that go.

#28 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-12-28 02:01 AM | Reply

#28. Thank you.

#29 | Posted by goatman at 2019-12-28 02:10 PM | Reply

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