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Wednesday, January 08, 2020

Let's hear what what good grub was consumed over the holidays, especially if itw as unusual. And let's hear what is on the menu for this weekend.

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I'll start by telling about the good dinner prepared by the DR's own Jeffj and goatman last Friday.

Jeff knows his way around the grill. He made an absolutely delicious and moist turkey that was out of this world. We both collaborated on a roasted poblano and garlic potato dish. Jeff did the potatoes in the smoker and that added another dimension of *yum* to the dish. I fork mashed them and added poasted poblanos and roasted garlic and cream.

The vegetable dish was one of my own making. I roasted split brussel sprouts, carrots, onions, and apples at a very high temperature (550 F) in bacon fat for about ten minutes then drizzled with maple syrup before serving.

I caused lung distress at Jeff's house, however. When I roasted them in the kitchen, the house filled with fumes that had his entire family and me choking and coughing. I'm surprised his wife did not kick me out of the house. But after we aired the place out, they worked well in the potatoes.

After dinner we had a light saber fight in the living room.

#1 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-08 06:19 PM | Reply

Goat's veggies were the star of the evening.

When I got back after dropping Goat off at his hotel I asked my wife and kids, "Were you guys just being polite or were you actually blown away by Goat's food?"

Younger son: "YES!!!"

Older son: "Oh. My. God!"

Goat also showed us a bunch of pictures from his time on an oil rig. The pics and the accompanying explanations were fascinating.

#2 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-08 06:27 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Another variation to the vegetable recipe is to roast the veggies with olive oil and butter and instead of the maple syrup, toss hot veggies with Dijon mustard.

A third option, more of a salad is to roast veggies (I make eggplant a staple for this one) in olive oil. Remove from roasting pan immediately and allow to cool. Toss with vinegar and Dijon. Ithere's enough oil from the roasting) and toss in a handful of fresh basil and/or arugula and if desired some peccorino cheese. Servie chilled.

#3 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-08 06:38 PM | Reply

#3

After 2 decades as a vegetarian countless recipes and chefs I have become convinced that there is only way to make eggplant taste good.

Take an eggplant chop it up, throw the pieces in the compost heap. Allow to compost 1 year, use the compost to grow literally any other vegetable. After carefully following these steps your eggplant will taste great.

#4 | Posted by TaoWarrior at 2020-01-08 08:03 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

#4 -- LOL Tao! You crack me up,. I love eggplant in any way, shape, or form. One of my favorites is the Szechuah style with the garlic, ginger root, hot pepper, and ground pork.

#5 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-08 08:23 PM | Reply

For Christmas I made beef stew.

I made some bombers over the holidays - Take a 1 pound Bob Evans spicy sausage roll, cook it on the top rack of the Weber Smokey Mountain with the bowl removed and with all of the vents wide open with about 40 lit coals on top of an equal amount of unlit coals. The sausage drip onto the fire causing grill smoke and because they are sitting above the fire without a diffuser they pick up great color. Toward the end of the cook I hit them with a citrus maple glaze. Extremely simple but surprisingly tasty. They were a bit hit.

#6 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-08 08:26 PM | Reply

I love the 'dripping' grease meathod. I use that on lamb as well since it is so greasy. But it has to be watched closely. Runaway flames are occur easily with the lamb.

#7 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-08 08:31 PM | Reply

Tao, I think Jeff has similar feelings towards eggplant.

#8 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-08 08:43 PM | Reply

I like the flavor of eggplant. My issue with it is mostly textural. But, like lamb I'm the only one in my house who likes it so I never cook it.

#9 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-08 08:48 PM | Reply

I wish I had some good recipes to share but for the past two months I've lived on snacks, microwave meals and frozen pizza. When you work 11-13 hours 6 days a week your food priorities change from good food to, if I don't eat I'll starve so shove a couple handfuls of peanuts in your mouth while driving to the next job, take a handful of vitamins in the morning and do it again.

#10 | Posted by TaoWarrior at 2020-01-08 09:16 PM | Reply

But, like lamb I'm the only one in my house who likes it so I never cook it.

Lamb is delicious. But the flavor can be very powerful.

You probably won't make it, since, as you said, you'd be the only one eating it.

But. The best lamb I've made was tenderloin. I chopped up a large onion for ever pound of lamb I had. In a ziplock bags I put the lamb, the chopped onion, yogurt, salt. Pepper. Saffron. Lots of lemon juice. And let it marinate over night.

The onions draw out the smell and strong flavor. The lemon juice tenderizes the meat. The saffron adds a delicious flavor and color.

Chop the lamb up in cubes. Skewer the meat, you can alternate meat onion bell pepper. Or just keep it all meat.

Cook over hot coals. Like 2 minutes per side. Don't over cook.

Serve with rice or in between bread. Lavash bread works best. Fresh Herbs are served on the side. Green basil, dill, green onions, tarragon...

It's a great meal.

#11 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-08 09:25 PM | Reply

Take an eggplant chop it up, throw the pieces in the compost heap. Allow to compost 1 year, use the compost to grow literally any other vegetable. After carefully following these steps your eggplant will taste great.

POSTED BY TAOWARRIOR AT 2020-01-08 08:03 PM | REPLY

Raw diced eggplant in salad is quite yummers.

#12 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2020-01-08 09:31 PM | Reply

Raw diced eggplant??

I don't believe I've ever heard of eating raw eggplant.

Not that I doubt you.

Just, the first time I've ever heard of it.

#13 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-08 09:34 PM | Reply

Yep raw.

#14 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2020-01-08 09:35 PM | Reply

There was a time when it was thought that raw eggplant was poisonous, but that's not the case. When eaten raw, eggplant has a somewhat bitter, but pleasant taste and spongy texture. Once cooked, though, the taste becomes more mild and a bit richer. It also takes on a soft, creamy texture.

I swear, when I was younger I was told raw eggplant was poisonous. Looks like I was misinformed.

Who says you don't learn anything new on the DR.

#15 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-08 09:44 PM | Reply

#11 that sounds fantastic, Clown. I love the inclusion of saffron in your marinade. The very first thing I cooked in my offset this spring was leg of lamb. I used small hickory splits and cooked the lamb very close to the firebox. I had a combination rub of dried spices and fresh herbs mashed in olive oil. I pulled it when it hit 135 internal. It was my contribution to a family party. When it hit 120 internal I pulled it from the cooking chamber and moved it to a grate above the fire in the box. It got a great seat and was juicy and tender. It was a big hit.

#16 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-08 09:44 PM | Reply

#11 by cubing the lamb you have tons of surface area for the marinade. By cooking it directly over the hot coals you quickly get a good sear without overcooking the meat. Excellent technique, Clown. You are speaking my language. Goat and I were definitely speaking the same language when we cooked dinner together in my kitchen.

#17 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-08 09:50 PM | Reply

Leg of lamb is delicious. I haven't personally made any. But I love to eat it.

I like your dried rub method. I bet it came out great. Did it get a crust?

I've recently started using an African inspired Berbere blend as a dry rub. It's phenomenal.

It's a mixture of chili peppers, garlic, ginger, basil, korarima, rue, ajwain or radhuni, nigella, and fenugreek.

Fenugreek is big in Iranian cuisine. It's used in a lot of the dishes. Strong flavor.

#18 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-08 09:56 PM | Reply

cubing the lamb you have tons of surface area for the marinade.

Exactly. And you're absolutely correct. First cube then marinade.

#19 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-08 09:58 PM | Reply

Clown,

Yes, it got a great sear.

It got a ton of color just sitting so close to the firebox. That spice rub you described sounds really, really good.

#20 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-08 10:03 PM | Reply

Went to the son and DiL's for Xmas dinner this year. She's a decent cook, but doesn't cook large meals often. Made Cornish game hens, a first attempt, 1 for each of us. They were done but not browned. She did put apple and spices in them, but I like my hens browned and crispy.
So we have a year for her skills to improve. If it looks like she's not getting the hang of it, could one of youse set a plate for me next year?

#21 | Posted by 6thPersona at 2020-01-08 10:03 PM | Reply

Clown,

Those are some pretty exotic spices you listed. Could the be found at a mid-Eastern grocery store? We have some in Michigan and one is in the same strip mall where I get my haircut.

#22 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-08 10:08 PM | Reply

#21 the turkey I cooked with Goatman was crisp and the skin took on a nice mahogany color.

#23 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-08 10:09 PM | Reply

Clown,

I'm definitely going to try out that marinade you described for your lamb. I'll have to find a suitable substitute for the lamb though. Pork tenderloin comes to mind but I'm worried that assertive marinade would overpower the mild pork. I'd never marinate steak but lean cuts like top round can be a little tough and chewy so I'm thinking an overnight marinade will tenderize the meat, especially if it's cubed first.

#24 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-08 10:24 PM | Reply

#23
Yeah, the descriptions of your meal sound great.
The DiL just needs time to learn the subtleties.
She makes some pretty good meals, just not game hens. We'll get her lined out.

#25 | Posted by 6thPersona at 2020-01-08 10:24 PM | Reply

Jeff,

Look up Berbere on google. It comes as a pre made spice blend.

I've been trying to recreate it. But as you point out. A lot of the ingredients are very exotic and hard to come by.

Spices like korarima, rue, ajwain, nigella, radhuni. Can be found individually (again online). Or there's similar American versions of some of them. Korarima is in the ginger family. Ajwain is in the caraway family (cumin or fennel).

#26 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-08 10:26 PM | Reply

I never thought lamb to be strong. Mutton, yes, however.

But then again I do like goat and it is stronger than lamb.

#27 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-08 11:00 PM | Reply

Goat and lamb are the best meats for a good curry in my opinion.

#28 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-08 11:00 PM | Reply

Raw eggplant?

Um, no.

#29 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-08 11:02 PM | Reply

That turkey was so good, Jeff! And the color was great.

Penzeys.com has any spice you could ever want and probably several varieties of it. They have been my go-to spice source for over 20 years now. Check them out, Jeff

#30 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-08 11:06 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

I'm just glad your wife and sons survived the poblano incident. I was hurting, but when I heard them coughing in the other room, I knew it was bad!

#31 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-08 11:08 PM | Reply

goat and it is stronger than lamb.
#27 | POSTED BY GOATMAN

Absolutely. A little tougher too, right?

Goat and lamb are the best meats for a good curry in my opinion.
#28 | POSTED BY

I've had lamb curry a lot. There's a few really good Indian and Pakistani restaurants around here.

Never had goat curry. I'm sure it's good when prepared correctly.

#32 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-08 11:11 PM | Reply

Goat,

Those fumes were nothing compared to what the house smells like after I make shrimp stock. Can smell that for 2 days.

#33 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-08 11:32 PM | Reply

4 | POSTED BY TAOWARRIOR

LOL. Normally I would agree, but I've found a way to make it palatable.

This summer I found I'm a huge fan of baba ganoush. Or at least something close to it I was making.

Whenever I was smoking something, for the last two hours I would put some halved eggplants (rubber with olive oil on cut side then salted and peppered) on the top shelf.

When done smoking (was largely using 1:1 mix of cherry and apple) I'd put in 400 oven wrapped in foil for 30 to ensure it was cooked though.

After oven let it cool, then use a spoon to remove flesh and add salt, pepper, tahini, olive oil and lemon juice. Blend with immersion blender until homogenous and adjust flavor and thickness (with oil). I don't remember the exact amounts of each ingredient.

Very tasty.

#34 | Posted by jpw at 2020-01-09 12:32 PM | Reply

#34

That sounds great.

I've cooked eggplant on a bbq before. But didn't half it. Just put it on the grill whole, turning occasionally, until it looked like a fully deflated balloon. Then cut it open. Used a spoon to scoop out the meat. Then added curd, roasted garlic (i cut the top off two, drizzle with olive oil, wrap in foil and put on the bbq with the eggplant), turmeric, salt&pepper.

With some hot bread. It's amazing.

I like the idea of putting it in the over to make sure it's cooked through. Sometimes it's difficult to tell when it's fully cooked.

#35 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 12:48 PM | Reply

#32 -- goat is a little tougher than lamb, but not as much as you would think. I'll just braise it a half hour more for my curries and it comes out fine. A note on goat curry -- a chutney is almost a requisite. Go to your local Indian store and check out the more exotic ones. Supermarkets aren't well stocked for that sort of thing.

#36 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-09 12:51 PM | Reply

#34 -- authentic baba ganoush always used smoked eggplant. Most people don't go to the trouble, but they are not making an authentic one.

#37 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-09 12:52 PM | Reply

a chutney is almost a requisite.

I do love a good chutney.

There's a spicy mango one I would buy and eat with everything. Especially chicken.

I may have to go pick up some. :)

#38 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 12:57 PM | Reply

Penzeys.com has any spice you could ever want and probably several varieties of it.

That's really good to know. Thanks.

#39 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 01:00 PM | Reply

I do love good food, beer and music threads.

Nothing out of the ordinary at the Mustang Ranch. Just a spatchcocked duck. Rendered duck fat used in the mashed potatoes in place of butter. Definitely does not rise to the levels of Goat's gastronomical offerings.

#40 | Posted by MUSTANG at 2020-01-09 01:05 PM | Reply

#40 -- duck is wonderful. And good use of the rendered fat. I'm sure you saved any that was leftover. Duck and goose fat is expensive. They both work well when sauteeing garlic or onions for another dish. If you have enough of it, it makes the best French Fries ever. I once did a goose for xmas. It rendered about 1.5 quarts of fat. I made French Fries with it and they were to die for. Also goose and duck fat can be reused as it has a high smoke point.

My sister has a friend in Nashville who owns a French restaurant. He told us he "washes" his duck fact every 4 or 5 uses. He puts a small amount of water in it which of course sinkes to the bottom. He then turnes on the heat until it just starts to bubble up. After the water has evaporated, sediments will form that had coalesced on the water. It is then a simple matter to drain it off.

#41 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-09 01:21 PM | Reply

#39 == get Penzey's catalog. It is very informative. E.G. they'll tell you the differences between their 5 types of cinnamons and 10 differenct black peppers and how to use them. The catalog also unusual and killer recipes -- using their spices of course. LOL

They have a lot of proprietary blends that are great. They also make most of their curry, vindaloo, Rogan Josh, Garam Masala, and other Indian blends. Their Majarajah curry is one of my favorites. You can see the threads off saffron in it.

www.penzeys.com

#42 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-09 01:25 PM | Reply

Though Penzey's sells them, you don't have to buy whole nutmeg or bay leaves. They use them for packing in between the jars so they don't rattle and sake during shipping. They will also often throw in a free small jar of one of their blends for sampling. If you are on their mailing list, you will bet many promotional specials.

The only thing I don't like about them is that Bill Penzey is very political. If you are on their email list, he will send very opinionated political posts. I wrote once and told him I go to him as a purveyor of spices and not for his political opinions. He took me off his mailing list and I stopped getting the specials. I asked to be put back on and they wouldn't. So I had to re-register under my other seldom used email. LOL

#43 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-09 01:33 PM | Reply

the turkey I cooked with Goatman was crisp and the skin took on a nice mahogany color.
#23 | POSTED BY JEFFJ

Have you ever deep fried a turkey? I've been deep frying them for the past 6 years. The secret is all in the brine.

Well. That and making sure the turkey is dried off before putting it into the oil.

It's always cooked through. Very moist on the inside with an incredibly crispy skin.

Highly recommend it.

Also. Highly recommend watching deep fryer disasters on YouTube.

#44 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 01:35 PM | Reply

They also make most of their curry, vindaloo, Rogan Josh, Garam Masala, and other Indian blends.

The last two times I made chicken I used curry powder and garam masala. It was so good!

I'm definitely a fan.

I was already interested in the site but now I'm gonna register for the free spices and use a secondary email address as to avoid any junk emails. Thanks for the heads up.

#45 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 01:40 PM | Reply

#44 -- I've deep fried a turkey three times in the last 30 years. I have the equipment, but just haven't used it for that much. I'm always looking for improvment. What is the brine secret? Also, do you inject annything into the turkey?

#46 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-09 02:02 PM | Reply

The 'junk emails' actually come from the penzeys.com just as their specials. So if you want their specials -- and they have good ones -- don't forget to check that alternate email address.

Their garam masala tastes like it is high in coriander, (seed of cilantro) a spice I like.

#47 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-09 02:07 PM | Reply

Mackris can deep fry a turkey, and safely, with an elaborate setup.

#48 | Posted by nullifidian at 2020-01-09 02:09 PM | Reply

Clown,

I've deep fried a turkey on a couple of occasions.

It was good but I prefer it cooked using charcoal.

Also - on Youtube search: Frozen turkey in deep fryer. It's quite humorous.

#49 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-09 02:26 PM | Reply

It was good but I prefer it cooked using charcoal.

I've never eaten a turkey cooked over coals. (Except turkey legs at the Orange County Fair, but I feel like that doesn't really count). Sounds pretty amazing.

Any tips? How long does it take to cook?

#50 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 03:08 PM | Reply

Also - on Youtube search: Frozen turkey in deep fryer. It's quite humorous.

Oh absolutely. Some of them are just ridiculously funny.

#51 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 03:09 PM | Reply

Mackris can deep fry a turkey, and safely, with an elaborate setup.

What's the set up?

I go to the far end of my backyard where there's a concrete slab. Then set up a dog fence around the area to prevent dogs or friend's kids (or some of my friends), from getting close to it.

At three and a half minutes per pound. It takes about 45 minutes to fully cook. Then I let it rest before carving.

#52 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 03:14 PM | Reply

CS: What are your thoughts on my questions in post 46?

#53 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-09 03:18 PM | Reply

What is the brine secret? Also, do you inject annything into the turkey?

The first few years I deep fried I only did dry rubs. And while the skin and exterior of the bird was deliciously flavored. The meat was flavorless. So this year I brined.

I found a couple brine recipes online and combined them. In a big pot I combined lots of salt, peppercorns, garlic and onion powder, bay leaves, rosemary and thyme, brown sugar, orange and lemon zest, turmeric and paprika.

Then I heated it up, don't boil, you're mainly trying to dissolve the salt.

Then in a giant turkey bag put in the turkey and pour equal parts ice cold water and brine until the turkey is submerged. Seal it up. Rest over night.

The next day take it out and dry with paper towels.

Then I injected it with a melted butter / Cajan spice mix. And covered the skin with a Southwest seasoning blend, (lots of brown sugar).

The flavors were outstanding and the meat was flavored throughout the bird all the way to the bones. It was so good I will never go back to only dry rub.

#54 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 03:34 PM | Reply

What are your thoughts on my questions in post 46?

Sorry. Wasn't ignoring you. Just ended up responding to posts in a random order.

#55 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 03:35 PM | Reply

've never eaten a turkey cooked over coals. (Except turkey legs at the Orange County Fair, but I feel like that doesn't really count). Sounds pretty amazing.

Any tips? How long does it take to cook?

#50 | POSTED BY CLOWNSHACK

It all depends on what kind of charcoal cooker you are using. For example, the method is different if I'm using the Pit Barrel Cooker vs my big Weber kettle.

#56 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-09 03:40 PM | Reply

After you've dissolved the salt in water using heat you will want to fill whatever you are using to hold the turkey over night with ice. The bath should be ice cold. As Goat observed I use a 16 quart stock pot to hold the turkey in the brine. But, as Clown mentioned brine bags can be purchased if you don't own a suitably sized stock pot.

Speaking of stock...I made a batch of turkey stock last night. It came out really good.

#57 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-09 03:43 PM | Reply

It all depends on what kind of charcoal cooker you are using.

Valid point.

#58 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 03:44 PM | Reply

After you've dissolved the salt in water using heat you will want to fill whatever you are using to hold the turkey over night with ice. The bath should be ice cold

Yes. Absolutely correct.

brine bags can be purchased if you don't own a suitably sized stock pot

Also depends on the size of your fridge and how much free space there is. A brine pot takes up more space than a turkey in a brine bag.

#59 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 03:48 PM | Reply

Speaking of stock...I made a batch of turkey stock last night. It came out really good.

Nice. I usually make turkey carcass soup with the leftovers.

Never throw away what can be made into something delicious.

#60 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 03:50 PM | Reply

34 -- authentic baba ganoush always used smoked eggplant. Most people don't go to the trouble, but they are not making an authentic one.

#37 | POSTED BY GOATMAN

That's what I thought but everything I read (recipes and info) said roasted.

Good to know I'm making the good schit!

Oh and garlic. I forgot to mention adding minced garlic.

Also four thumbs up on Penzy's. They have a store front where I live that I love stopping into to browse now and then when I'm in the area.

#61 | Posted by jpw at 2020-01-09 04:28 PM | Reply

Clown,

I have three grills and three smokers. If you tell me what you are using odds are I can advise you as how to set up your fire and how to position the bird.

#62 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-09 04:30 PM | Reply

#59

Excellent point regarding fridge space.

#63 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-09 04:31 PM | Reply

CS -- Now I'm inclined to make a fried turkey next chance I have to feed a lot of people. Question: The brown sugar doesn't burn in the oil or on the bird?

#64 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-09 04:38 PM | Reply

I have two Weber grills. One charcoal, one gas.

The Weber Q 1000 is super convenient for cooking something after work. Had it for about 8 years.

The other is a Weber 22" Original Kettle I use on the weekends when I have more time to play. Got it about 5 years ago.

I've been wanting to get a smoker. It's on my wish list.

#65 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 04:43 PM | Reply

I have three grills and three smokers.

#62 | POSTED BY JEFFJ AT 2020-01-09 04:30 PM | FLAG:

If you mow your lawn and find a bbq pit, you might be a redneck.

#66 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2020-01-09 04:48 PM | Reply

Question: The brown sugar doesn't burn in the oil or on the bird?

It didn't. But. Neither does the rest of the dry rub.

Although. I do massage the rub in pretty good.

One year I caked on dry rub, figuring the more the better, it came out burnt. Leaned my lesson not to do that again.

#67 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 04:49 PM | Reply

"Also four thumbs up on Penzy's. They have a store front where I live that I love stopping into to browse now and then when I'm in the area.

#61 | POSTED BY JPW"

I wish they had a store in San Antonio. They have on in Dallas I visit when I go visit my sons. When I first started buying from them they had only one store, and it was in Wisconsin. They are growing, so hopefully they'll get on in SA or Austin. Otherwise it's still mail order unless I get to Dallas. But that's no problem, really. I like the free bay leaves and nutmeg.

When I go to the store in Dallas I"m like a kid in a candy store. I open every sample jar (after shaking) and smell it. LOL

#68 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-09 04:54 PM | Reply

It seems more often than not, the brine bag will get a micro-puncture for a feather quill or that little bone on the forewing causing a leak.

#69 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-09 04:56 PM | Reply

Clown,

Lay down some unlit coals banked to 1 side. Pour about 2/3 of life coals over the unlit coals. Put the bird opposite the hot coals and position the vent on the lid above the turkey. You'll need to rotate the bird every half hour or so. It should take 2-3 hours using this method. You do not want the turkey directly above the coals in a Weber kettle. I have a rotisserie ring for the 22" kettle. I used at for Thanksgiving at the in laws and the skin was deep mahogany and crisp. If you rotate every half hour you should be able to achieve that. I used the fire set up that I jyst described.

An excellent after market product for the Weber kettle is called the Slow n Sear. It makes 2-zone grilling a breeze with the sear zone getting nuclear hot and it also makes low/slow smoking in the kettle super easy with great results. Just make sure you have a hinged grate.

#70 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-09 04:59 PM | Reply

I was very surprised at how beautifully and quickly Jeff's turkey roasted. Not that I doubted his grilling/smoking skills, I just simply thought it wasn't possible to cook a turkey in that size in that short of a time. But of course I was wrong. The bird was cooked to perfection -- not at all overcooked and very moist.

#71 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-09 05:18 PM | Reply

It seems more often than not, the brine bag will get a micro-puncture for a feather quill or that little bone on the forewing causing a leak.

That would be a nightmare. There's so much fluid in those brine bags.

Literally my biggest worry of the process is the bag accidentally opening up while in the fridge.

#72 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 06:42 PM | Reply

Lay down some unlit coals banked to 1 side. Pour about 2/3 of life coals over the unlit coals.

I was reading in your prior post about layering unlit coals with lit ones and that's very interesting. I've never done it before. I will have to try it out.

I want to try your turkey technique with a chicken. Both for practice and because it's more practical. A turkey would be too much food without inviting more people over. 2-3 hours for a turkey would be like 45 minutes to an hour for a chicken? Or longer? I guess I can use a meat thermometer to make sure the breast and thighs are done.

#73 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 06:52 PM | Reply

An excellent after market product for the Weber kettle is called the Slow n Sear.

I'll have to look into getting one.

#74 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-01-09 06:53 PM | Reply

Clown,

You're looking at about an hour for chicken.

I absolutely love the Slow n Sear. Best accessory ever for the Weber kettle. Tons of good YouTube videos for it.

#75 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-01-09 08:43 PM | Reply

#75 I can vouch for it. I'm going to start pricing them. It would be especially nice if Lowe's stocks them since I get a 10% discount

#76 | Posted by goatman at 2020-01-11 01:13 PM | Reply

I'm eating my neighbors. Again. I should get in to real-estate. Plenty of new openings.

So I use throught the police by making them think I'm a religious nut.

Advice.

#77 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2020-01-11 03:45 PM | Reply

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