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Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Thursday, March 26, 2020

[N]ot even grocery stores can keep up the facade of normalcy. As many health experts have feared, last week, reports began to trickle in of grocery-store workers coming down with COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

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Grocery store workers and metro bus drivers are America's knights in dull armor and they all deserve thanks and a salute!

#1 | Posted by grumpy_too at 2020-03-24 09:34 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#1

Service workers of all kinds have been at the front lines of this the whole time. We may be on the verge of seeing an attitude shift in how we view service employees.

If things get bad enough you may even see wage or benefit growth for them. Once a store can't staff at current wage levels they will be forced to close or pay more. The ones that choose to pay more have a better chance of surviving if this lasts months so the trend might outlast the virus.

Or I might be a dreamer.

#2 | Posted by TaoWarrior at 2020-03-24 09:46 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Doctors are essential.
Fast food workers are... replaceably essential.
Make sure the poor are desperate enough and they will do the essential work.

#3 | Posted by snoofy at 2020-03-24 09:59 PM | Reply

Tipping has gotten out of hand.

#4 | Posted by sentinel at 2020-03-24 10:50 PM | Reply

Have it so that customers can order from a menu and have it brought to the front door.

#5 | Posted by Tor at 2020-03-24 11:23 PM | Reply

#5

There is this thing called the "internet" where you can order things off a "menu" from your computer and they will deliver it to your door, you should try it some time.

#6 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2020-03-25 12:14 AM | Reply

There is this thing called the "internet" where you can order things off a "menu" from your computer and they will deliver it to your door, you should try it some time.

Tried. No luck. Must have to be some kind of Hollywood elite to make that happen. Got your Oscars tickets?

#7 | Posted by REDIAL at 2020-03-25 12:34 AM | Reply

#7 | POSTED BY REDIAL

Wrong thread but I don't care....have you ever tried wrapping your brisket in butcher paper after the stall and after good bark has developed?

What temp are you running your kamado?

#8 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-03-25 12:37 AM | Reply

#7

Pretty much available all over Southern California, go to Ralphs.com.

#9 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2020-03-25 12:43 AM | Reply

Wrong thread but I don't care....have you ever tried wrapping your brisket in butcher paper

If I do that the Terrorists win.

What temp are you running your kamado?

225ish

#10 | Posted by REDIAL at 2020-03-25 12:51 AM | Reply

Pretty much available all over Southern California...

20 hour drive... I'll see if I can make my own.

#11 | Posted by REDIAL at 2020-03-25 12:58 AM | Reply

Redial,

In my experience and from what I've learned from others at the Pit Master Club at Amazingribs.com 225 is too low for big cuts like brisket. For baby backs and spares it's a good temp - I strive for 225-250 for pork ribs. Briskets and butts actually cook better at higher temps. Try running at the 260-290 range. I know that sounds extremely high, but it really does cook better at that range IMO. Like you I avoid wrapping unless I have to speed up the end of the cook. All the more reason higher temps will produce better results for you. Bark rules, but we don't want jerky. Also, with a slightly bigger fire your kamado will impart more smoke flavor. It's not just the smoke itself that imparts flavor, it's the gases from the fuel itself. If an electric smoker (I used to own a Bradley) produced the same flavor as an offset burning small splits, that requires a lot of baby sitting, produced the same flavor profile - nobody would even bother with charcoal or splits. Propane produces more flavor due to the gases than an electric coil. Charcoal produces more gases than propane - surely you know that when talking about propane vs charcoal the old adage is, "Charcoal tastes better." Wood produces more gases than charcoal. When I use my offset using small hickory splits I achieve a flavor profile I can't achieve in one of my charcoal cookers with charcoal as the fuel and small hickory chunks for the smoke.

You'll get more BBQ flavor running in the 260-290 range in your egg because the fire will be producing more gases and the brisket will ultimately cook faster, especially pre and post-stall so that once it hits the desired internal temp you'll have bark and not jerky on the exterior.

#12 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-03-25 01:04 AM | Reply

Redial,

Kamados are difficult to bring back down if they overshoot the desired temp which is why I gave you a temperature range. Just give that top vent a bit more twist than where you normally have it when shooting for 225ish and you should be able to hit the 260-290 range. With brisket, if you are running north of 300, don't panic, just make a slight adjustment to the top vent and it will correct. Brisket is forgiving enough that you can run above 300 for an hour and it's fine.

#13 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-03-25 01:17 AM | Reply

Redial,

1 final tip (you may already be doing this) once you pull the meat our of your Egg, wrap it in foil, wrap that in some rag towels and let it rest for at least an hour and up to 4 hours. It will further tenderize without melting your bark.

It's interesting. I've found that prime grade brisket packers are best at 195 internal but chuck roasts are best at 205-207 internal. I'd run a choice flat (I'm assuming you are cooking a flat) to about 200 internal and then let it rest as I've described before cutting/shredding.

#14 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-03-25 01:26 AM | Reply

1 more thing, after it's been wrapped in rag towels pop it into a cooler.

#15 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-03-25 01:29 AM | Reply

I'm not doing anything big. Brisket (if I can find one) might be 3 lb tops and pretty thin so hard to work with.

Agreed on temp runaways... effing thing will never come back down.

#16 | Posted by REDIAL at 2020-03-25 01:36 AM | Reply

That's great info, Jeff. thx

#17 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2020-03-25 01:40 AM | Reply

#16

Even a small cut of boneless meat can take a really long time to cook. A 3 pound boneless brisket is holding WAY more water than a 3 pound slab of bone-in pork ribs.

I am looking to smoke a 3 pound beef chuck roast this weekend and if I do I will be shooting for the 260-290 range.

Even with smaller cuts, the stall is still long.

If I choose to purchase a 20 pound bone-in butt at Gordon's I'll trim any fat cap and will trim what's left down to 2.5-5 pound butts. More surface area for bark and quicker cooking times on both sides of the stall.

#18 | Posted by JeffJ at 2020-03-25 01:50 AM | Reply

I can't speak for anyone else but today I find Jeff's recipes or whatever about briskets to be offensive.

I know people who work in grodery stores, we do need a system to get food without spreading disease. I've neard from my step-grandson in Ukraine. There they line up for hours, 10 people allowed to shop at one time and they can buy 10 items. That is America in a few months.

#19 | Posted by danni at 2020-03-26 08:59 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

Good God Danni don't scare me like that. I'm fat use a cane for walking(I have really bad RA) and I'm slow to boot. I'd never get groceries at that rate. That scares me.

#20 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2020-03-26 09:08 AM | Reply

There they line up for hours, 10 people allowed to shop at one time and they can buy 10 items. That is America in a few months.

If the hoarding fools hadn't messed up the supply chain things would still be normal. I used to to to the grocery store once a week to get the stuff I needed for the next week. Now I have to go twice a day to see if any of the stuff I still need has been stocked. So now the folks working in the store get 14x the exposure to me than normal, and me to them. I wish every roll of TP in North America spontaneously burst into flames right now. I'm tempted to go out and buy every single jug of windshield washer fluid I can find just to see if I can start something new.

#21 | Posted by REDIAL at 2020-03-26 09:15 AM | Reply

I place a delivery order through my local Kroger on Saturday that was delivered last night, the earliest spot available at that time. My state went to "Stay at home" just yesterday at 12.01am, so I imagine the delay times are much greater now.

I was able to edit my "cart" up until 2 hours from my delivery time and received real time text updates from my "picker" as some items weren't available and others had to be substituted for. They informed me within 10 minutes of their arrival and it was done "no contact" as the bags of groceries were placed in my screened-in porch.

The delivery fee was $10 and I tipped them an additional $10. I couldn't be happier with the service.

#22 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-03-26 09:25 AM | Reply

#22 | POSTED BY TONYROMA

Did you wipe down the products as you emptied the bags? Wash your hands afterward?
Their delivery service is a good and worthwhile thing, but the picker was not the only person handling the goods.

#23 | Posted by 6thPersona at 2020-03-26 10:03 AM | Reply

When it really gets right down to sanitizing the food items our goose is cooked. No, I'm not wiping them down. I am staying home, taking reasonable precautions but not going crazy about it. I don't believe it will make any difference in the end, one way or the other.

And Laura, I'm just reporting what he told me. We will get there whether we like it or not and when we're hungry enough we'll put up with whatever we have to put up with to feed ourselves.

#24 | Posted by danni at 2020-03-26 10:17 AM | Reply

#23

Yes on everything.

#25 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-03-26 11:22 AM | Reply

If it's to the point we have to wipe/spray raw food with sanitizer, we might as well forget it. Packaged items, fine. But once upon a time, fresh produce was considered good for you. Now I don't know.

#26 | Posted by cbob at 2020-03-26 12:24 PM | Reply

Stop touching yourselves in the grocery stores!

Dr Gupta says stop touching yourself.

#27 | Posted by donnerboy at 2020-03-26 12:30 PM | Reply

Snoofy, there's a video that goes into more detail: youtu.be

#28 | Posted by cbob at 2020-03-26 12:41 PM | Reply

#28
Yeesh, I meant Donnerboy. My apologies to both of you!

#29 | Posted by cbob at 2020-03-26 01:29 PM | Reply

"If things get bad enough you may even see wage or benefit growth for them."

Wages a are generally driven by the scarcity of the skillset relative to demand. Next comes risk. And if you're working in a grocery store right now, it's almost certainly more risky than being on the deck of an aircraft carrier or jumping out of an airplane.

Or at least that's how I see it. Maybe they don't. Maybe there are still lots of people out there who would be willing to go work in a grocery store during the pandemic.

#30 | Posted by madbomber at 2020-03-27 02:43 PM | Reply

"I'm not doing anything big. Brisket (if I can find one) might be 3 lb tops and pretty thin so hard to work with."

I have a brisket thawing right now. I have a 220v Mayer (basically German Traeger) pellet grill.

Any suggestions?

#31 | Posted by madbomber at 2020-03-27 02:45 PM | Reply

"That is America in a few months."

Not likely.

If China is any indication, this will be over in less than three months.

And if not...we can't live like a bunch of scared rabbits forever.

#32 | Posted by madbomber at 2020-03-27 02:47 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

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