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Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Sunday, April 05, 2020

Capt. Brett Crozier, hailed by his crew but fired as skipper of the aircraft carrier Theodore Roosevelt by Navy leadership following a leaked bombshell letter, has tested positive for COVID-19, the New York Times first reported. A Navy spokesman declined to comment to the Times on Crozier's COVID-19 status.

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Wow. If this Captain already wasn't beloved by his crew, now he's likely to be lionized throughout the entire Navy.

If he already isn't.

#1 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-04-05 05:00 PM | Reply

A real man tests positive for bone spurs.

#2 | Posted by reinheitsgebot at 2020-04-05 05:25 PM | Reply

Trump prolly still wonders why the military vote has abandoned him.

#3 | Posted by Corky at 2020-04-05 08:16 PM | Reply

"He knew the risks when he signed up."

#4 | Posted by snoofy at 2020-04-05 08:22 PM | Reply

It is not known when Captain Crozier's diagnosis was made, or whether the Navy was aware of his infection when he was removed from command, if the medical results came before his punishment.

Friends and colleagues say Captain Crozier, 50, is at peace with a decision that likely ended a career that vaulted him from the United States Naval Academy to the prestigious job as captain of one of the Navy's 11 aircraft carriers.

Online, members of Captain Crozier's Naval Academy Class of 1992 have rallied behind their classmate. Members of the class, most of whom have long since left the military, say their private Facebook group is overflowing with posts and comments in support of the captain. "The volume of posts was almost exponential," one classmate, Mark Roppolo, said in a telephone interview.

"Chopper always had the best interests of his crew forefront. I'm sure that was the case here," Mr. Craig said. "Chopper's character is not prone to hasty or uneducated decision making. Anything he did was well thought out."

Dan Goldenberg, another Naval Academy classmate of Captain Crozier's, said that "Modly is wrong no matter what. He either made the wrong call in firing Crozier, or if he made the right call, he did a terrible job of explaining it " it's just illogical," said Mr. Goldenberg, a retired Navy captain and special assistant to four secretaries of the Navy.

www.nytimes.com

Another American patriot whose career has been sacrificed at the altar of appeasing the sociopathy of Cult 45. Godspeed on his recovery.

#5 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-04-05 08:26 PM | Reply

"Chopper's character is not prone to hasty or uneducated decision making. Anything he did was well thought out."

^
This exemplifues why so many Americans will welcome a military coup.

The stage is being set.

#6 | Posted by snoofy at 2020-04-05 09:04 PM | Reply

So many Sailors are going to name their kids after this man.

#7 | Posted by Tor at 2020-04-05 09:36 PM | Reply

The left's lionization of this man is sort of stupid.

What he did was wrong. Period. End of story. No matter how you want to romanticize it. It was wrong.

Text book example of how loose lips sink ships.

I understand what he was trying to do. He just went about it all wrong.

#8 | Posted by boaz at 2020-04-05 09:59 PM | Reply

Army guys always show the love for the Navy.

#9 | Posted by REDIAL at 2020-04-05 10:02 PM | Reply

What he did was wrong. Period.

No, what he did was the right thing for both the ship's mission and the welfare of his men during a crisis response that was never anticipated in the Navy's operational manuals.

The Navy brass were taking far too long in separating the infected sailors from the rest of the crew, which impacted the operational readiness of everyone else on board. The Captain understood this all too well and acted accordingly, even though he knew that what he was doing might indeed cost him his command and probably his career.

Unlike what you infer that you would have done Boaz, this patriot sacrificed himself in service of this nation's and his own ship's security when the applicable rules and regulations conflicted with the intent of his mission: Protect his crew and maintain the ability to project force when ordered to. If the majority of the crew were to become sick and unable to physically man their stations, the consequences could have been dire if the ship were called upon to take action.

In calmer times, the internal investigation would have been allowed to play out unlike now. But to say what the Captain did was wrong is to say that the lives and operational capabilities of the carrier weren't as important as him following the bureaucratic chain of command, and that makes no sense at all given the uniqueness of the conditions and the decades-long spotless service record of the Captain.

#10 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-04-05 10:19 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 4

I think Boaz is mostly disturbed that a Nimitz class carrier is crewed by "The Left".

I can see how that might be unsettling to him. But glad to see he got the WiFi up and running in The Bunker.

#11 | Posted by REDIAL at 2020-04-05 10:26 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

No, what he did was the right thing for both the ship's mission and the welfare of his men during a crisis response that was never anticipated in the Navy's operational manuals.
The Navy brass were taking far too long in separating the infected sailors from the rest of the crew, which impacted the operational readiness of everyone else on board. The Captain understood this all too well and acted accordingly, even though he knew that what he was doing might indeed cost him his command and probably his career.
Unlike what you infer that you would have done Boaz, this patriot sacrificed himself in service of this nation's and his own ship's security when the applicable rules and regulations conflicted with the intent of his mission: Protect his crew and maintain the ability to project force when ordered to. If the majority of the crew were to become sick and unable to physically man their stations, the consequences could have been dire if the ship were called upon to take action.
In calmer times, the internal investigation would have been allowed to play out unlike now. But to say what the Captain did was wrong is to say that the lives and operational capabilities of the carrier weren't as important as him following the bureaucratic chain of command, and that makes no sense at all given the uniqueness of the conditions and the decades-long spotless service record of the Captain.
#10 | POSTED BY TONYROMA AT 2020-04-05 10:19 PM | FLAG: | NEWSWORTHY 1

^This is so much more convincing than:

The left's lionization of this man is sort of stupid.
What he did was wrong. Period. End of story. No matter how you want to romanticize it. It was wrong.
Text book example of how loose lips sink ships.
I understand what he was trying to do. He just went about it all wrong.

#8 | POSTED BY BOAZ


By a long shot.

#12 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-04-05 10:42 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

"What he did was wrong. Period."

Serious question, Boaz:
What did he do?

#13 | Posted by snoofy at 2020-04-05 11:01 PM | Reply

What did he do?
#13 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

Speculation, but I'm guessing that the Captain did not follow hierarchical procedure.

#14 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-04-05 11:12 PM | Reply

What he did was wrong. Period. End of story. No matter how you want to romanticize it. It was wrong.

Which was why he accepted the consequences for his actions.

Text book example of how loose lips sink ships.
I understand what he was trying to do. He just went about it all wrong.

#8 | POSTED BY BOAZ

How should he have done it?

The ship is in port, not somewhere on a cruise with an unknown position or purpose.

#15 | Posted by jpw at 2020-04-06 01:14 AM | Reply

#15 What he did wrong was make Trump look bad. Period.

Deplorables can't even say that much.

Their cowardice is no less than you'd expect from the type of person who says "oh, well" when their spiritual leader and President doesn't so much fumble the COVID-19 ball as run it into the wrong end zone and spike the ball and start doing a victory dance on the bodies of... I think we're up to three 9/11s now.

Three 9/11s and this party is just getting started.

This is no longer a President capable of doing his duty. which is rather kind, because it suggests he once was. He needs to be relieved of command.

#16 | Posted by snoofy at 2020-04-06 02:21 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

Snoof and JPW are right.

These were not men in a war zone of any sort.

The government has no right to demand any of them die so that politicians might save face.

#17 | Posted by Tor at 2020-04-06 02:41 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

The Navy said Captain Crozier make public, information about the ship's readiness.

I have mixed feelings about that.


#18 | Posted by Twinpac at 2020-04-06 06:05 AM | Reply

"The Navy said Captain Crozier make public, information about the ship's readiness."

He made public information about the military's readiness.
You might take a step back and ask what would compel a man who has spend his life in service to our nation to do such a thing.
One might from that vantage point be able to notice the significant number of red blinking lights on the dashboard of the ship of state.

I wonder if Boaz can see it.
Boaz, can you see it?
Blink twice if you can see it, Boaz.

#19 | Posted by snoofy at 2020-04-06 06:12 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

The #8

Boaz is trolling. F off bozo

Army sucks. Like you.

The man is a national hero.

We are all very proud of him. I would follow him into battle.

I wouldn't follow Trumpy into the bathroom. I will never follow Trumpy.

Semper Fi.

#20 | Posted by donnerboy at 2020-04-06 10:10 AM | Reply

"You might take a step back and ask what would compel a man who has spend his life in service to our nation to do such a thing."

I did that SNOOFY. And I understand his concern. What I don't know is how many times he tried to go through the normal chain of command (to no avail) before he was forced to take such drastic action.

Considering his record, I would like to think that was the case. From what we know, he doesn't seem like the knee-jerk type.

#21 | Posted by Twinpac at 2020-04-06 10:17 AM | Reply

Capt. Brett Crozier, fired last week from command of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, joins a growing list of Navy officers who attempted to raise concerns about the safety of their ships and crew, only to pay with their jobs.

Crozier wrote a letter dated March 30 warning that an outbreak of the coronavirus on his ship was a threat to his crew of some 4,000 sailors unless they disembarked and quarantined.

"We are not at war, and therefore cannot allow a single sailor to perish as a result of this pandemic unnecessarily," Crozier wrote. "Decisive action is required now."

As part of our 2019 investigation into the incidents in the Navy's 7th Fleet, its largest overseas presence, ProPublica found repeated instances of frontline commanders warning superiors of risks the fleet was facing " a lack of training, exhausted crews, deteriorating ships and equipment. Those warnings, all sent through the normal chain of command, were met with indifference.

Disaster in the fleet struck in June 2017, after the USS Fitzgerald, a destroyer, collided with a cargo ship in the Sea of Japan. Two months later, a second destroyer, the USS John S. McCain, collided with an oil tanker in the Singapore Strait. The two accidents cost the Navy 17 sailors " the biggest loss of life in maritime collisions in more than 40 years.

Navy investigations laid blame on nearly the entire chain of command in the 7th Fleet, punishing commanders and sailors for failing to properly train and equip its crews and ships.

Adm. Joseph Aucoin, the head of the 7th Fleet, was fired. Vice Adm. Thomas Rowden, who oversaw training, was forced from his job. Cmdr. Bryce Benson, captain of the Fitzgerald, was recommended for court-martial.

But ProPublica reported that all three men had repeatedly tried to warn higher-ups of dangerous safety issues in the vaunted fleet, based at Yokosuka, Japan. They argued to their superiors that the Navy was running ships in the 7th Fleet too hard, too fast. Their warnings were dismissed.

www.propublica.org

This is not a one-off, it's just the latest in a chain of command issues in the US Navy's 7th Fleet.

#22 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-04-06 10:42 AM | Reply

#21 | Posted by Twinpac

His CO came out and said he would have blocked any attempt that Captain Cozier would have taken to alert the Chain of Command and expedite the disembarking of crew. That pretty much sums up why he did what he did. His CO is a Trump man. You know "the virus isn't a threat"...

#23 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2020-04-06 11:13 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Best part of the letter:

"We are not at war," Captain Crozier wrote. "Sailors do not need to die. If we do not act now, we are failing to properly take care of our most trusted asset " our sailors."

#24 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2020-04-06 11:19 AM | Reply

This is a Republican administration. People don't matter to Republicans, only $. That's why there is no sufficient stockpile being maintained for this kind of disaster. It costs money they would rather spend on something else, like tax cuts for billionaires.

#25 | Posted by WhoDaMan at 2020-04-06 11:54 AM | Reply

#8 BOAZ

I find this precisely the opposite of loose lips sinking ships in that he may have saved 5,000 sailors. By maintaining a crippled vessel military command should answer to how that scenario enables a more capable Navy. Unless this was perhaps their test to determine impact on a significant crew.. meaning they are totally fine with loss of life including sailors. Either way the chain of command is culpable for not only losing an excellent Commander but creating a serious question as to their intention with his crew and our military readiness.

#26 | Posted by redlightrobot at 2020-04-06 02:20 PM | Reply

Thanks, TONY, PETE, REDLIGHT. I haven't followed this story as closely as I should. You've summed it up for me quite nicely. Conclusion: Trump's lazy lack of leadership has trickled down to the Pentagon and the Oval Office has turned into a pit stop between rounds of golf.

#27 | Posted by Twinpac at 2020-04-06 07:47 PM | Reply

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