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Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Wednesday, September 09, 2020

The Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in South Dakota last month was a coronavirus "superspreading event" that led to an estimated $12.2 billion in public health costs, according to a new study by the IZA Institute of Labor Economics. Researchers concluded that more than 266,000 cases were tied to the event attended by more than 460,000 individuals.

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Whodda thunk it? (quelle surprise)

Don't worry, if you couldn't make it to Sturgis, Sturgis will make it to you.

#1 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-08 08:19 PM | Reply

When I viewed the cited article on TheHill, this article was offered as additional reading....

Trump, supporters gather without masks despite request from local GOP official
thehill.com

So sad.

#2 | Posted by LampLighter at 2020-09-08 10:22 PM | Reply

There is no doubt that rally would be a super spreader event.

But where do they get these figures?

"That dollar amount is based on another estimation that an average of $46,000 is spent on each patient who tests positive for COVID-19."

come on......

#3 | Posted by eberly at 2020-09-08 10:43 PM | Reply

But where do they get these figures?

Hospitals and health systems face catastrophic financial challenges in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. The American Hospital Association (AHA) undertook four analyses to better understand and quantify these financial challenges.

This report attempts to quantify these effects over the short-term, which are limited to the impacts over a four-month period from March 1, 2020 to June 30, 2020. Based on these analyses, the AHA estimates a total four-month financial impact of $202.6 billion in losses for America's hospitals and health systems, or an average of $50.7 billion per month.

www.aha.org

If hospitals are losing $50 billion per month, then $12.2 billion is about 24 percent of that total. The Sturgis covid cases are estimated to be 20% of all US cases over the time period, and obviously hospitals are being paid for services in addition to their losses.

By this back of the envelope calculation, the numbers seem quite representative of what's already quantified.

#4 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-09 12:04 AM | Reply

The for profit hospital industry is losing billions while flooded with work. Sure.

#5 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2020-09-09 07:27 AM | Reply

"Health economists estimate Sturgis resulted in 19% of new U.S. cases last month and cost $12 billion in medical care.

Thomas Jefferson said Americans should be free to believe anything they want as long as 'it neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg.' Covid denial does both."

twitter.com

#6 | Posted by Gal_Tuesday at 2020-09-09 07:30 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

The for profit hospital industry is losing billions while flooded with work. Sure.

Are you really this ignorant of what's been published for months and months since the Covid pandemic started?

Hospitals have been bleeding money since the pandemic forced them to stop/delay the types of non-critical procedures that make them the bulk of their revenue due to Covid patients taking over hospitals and the need to focus all resources upon these patients.

It's been in every paper, every news source the world over. It's not unique to the U.S., it's global.

All "work" is not the same. Does the term "profit margin" ring a bell? Hospitals make more money on things like 'nipping and tucking', joint replacements, and many other procedures than they do in treating Covid patients for weeks and months in the ICU.

#7 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-09 07:37 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

#5

Hospitals could struggle - and more will go bankrupt - until they get patients back in the door

Hospitals across the United States are desperately trying to ramp up volume after months where they saw far fewer patients than usual. In March and April, many hospitals cancelled or delayed elective procedures to make space for a potential flood of Covid-19 patients. Because of that, hospitals were losing millions of dollars per day just staying open.

"We were losing $5 million per day, and now it's just a few million," said Dr. Bob Wachter, chairman of the department of medicine at UC San Francisco. Dr. Wachter expects that UCSF's hospitals will lose $600 to $700 million this year alone.

www.cnbc.com

#8 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-09 07:43 AM | Reply

non-critical procedures

#7 | POSTED BY TONYROMA AT 2020-09-09 07:37 AM | FLAG:

California. Meh. Elsewhere those procedures restarted in April.

#9 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2020-09-09 08:44 AM | Reply

Those procedures didn't start in NY and I believe in other states in the NE like CT and MA until June.

#10 | Posted by Gal_Tuesday at 2020-09-09 08:51 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Good thing they all took PPE bailouts then.

#11 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2020-09-09 08:55 AM | Reply

Elsewhere those procedures restarted in April.

Hospitals and health systems could lose $120.5 billion from July to December of this year, or roughly $20 billion a month, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new analysis from the American Hospital Association (AHA) found.

Hospitals and health systems are reporting an average decline of nearly 20% in inpatient volume and 34.5% in outpatient volume compared to 2020's baseline patient volume.

A majority of hospitals, 67%, told AHA that their volume won't return to pre-pandemic levels in 2020. AHA assumes that the return to the baseline will occur in July 2021.

www.fiercehealthcare.com

#12 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-09 10:05 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Don't worry guys,

I'm sure Amazon and all those other big companies who made nearly a trillion more dollars in six months will gladly donate a few billion of charity to rescue our system. Reagan told me so.

#13 | Posted by bocaink at 2020-09-09 10:58 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

I don't doubt that the event will help spread the virus. But I find it curious that anyone has managed to complete such a study only one month after the event began. An almost impossible time frame to conduct such a study.

Perhaps more than fact, I think a significant amount of supposition is embedded in this study and the subsequent press release.

#14 | Posted by Whatsleft at 2020-09-09 11:35 AM | Reply

While most of us are staying home, wearing masks and social distancing these a******s created a huge financial burden for our country. I have to wonder how many residents of Sturgis these jerks infected? The people of Sturgis had voted against having that rally but the motorcycle freaks ignored them and held the rally anyway.

#15 | Posted by danni at 2020-09-09 11:36 AM | Reply

I have to wonder how many residents of Sturgis these jerks infected?

Meade County sees 250% surge in COVID-19 cases after motorcycle rally

www.kotatv.com

#16 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-09 11:47 AM | Reply

But I find it curious that anyone has managed to complete such a study only one month after the event began. An almost impossible time frame to conduct such a study.

If you read the article - or actually saw numerous news reports upon this very research as it was going on in real time - you'd understand that it was based on time-lapsed cell phone monitoring of both arriving and then departing traffic which documented participants from almost every state in the union.

"It only takes a small number of people from places that have high infection rates to have a high likelihood that some of them are carrying the infection," he said. "It's kind of more of a mathematical certainty that you're going to have possible asymptomatic cases in that event space and that it will spread over that 10-day period and that those people will head back to their own communities and continue spreading."

www.washingtonpost.com

The methodology used appears to be quite sound and supported, even though it seems the initial reaction of many discount how much information can be gleaned from open public sourcing.

#17 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-09 11:55 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#17

Is someone also reporting an arbitrary but educated guess of the death toll from Sturgis? That number would certainly be more convincing at shaming the attendees for their actions.

#18 | Posted by Whatsleft at 2020-09-09 12:01 PM | Reply

#14

Cell phone data... morally questionable (although anonymized so it isn't a huge intrusion).

This type of data is much easier to collect than clinical trials or opinion polling.

the data is there, you just have to mine it.

#19 | Posted by bocaink at 2020-09-09 12:04 PM | Reply

Is someone also reporting an arbitrary but educated guess of the death toll from Sturgis?

So far only 1 - a 60 year old Minnesota man - that I've heard of. It's still a little early for deaths to start spiking. Treatment methods have gotten more effective since the Spring, so after only 1 month - and for others just 2 weeks - I wouldn't expect to see large numbers yet.

#20 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-09 12:32 PM | Reply

Gov. Kristi Noem-such a talented leader! So much winning!

#21 | Posted by Yodagirl at 2020-09-09 12:38 PM | Reply

So far only 1 - a 60 year old Minnesota man - that I've heard of. It's still a little early for deaths to start spiking. Treatment methods have gotten more effective since the Spring

#20 | POSTED BY TONYROMA

Which brings up another point. I think we'll need to see what happens as flu season gets rolling. But as treatment has improved, I'm not certain that this virus is much worse than other miladies humans suffer. With improved treatment lessening mortality, with precautionary measures in place, it may simply be possible to go back to some semblance of normal life.

As it works out, after months of learning how to treat it, COVID 19 may have genuinely been reduced to something no worse than many strains of influenza.

#22 | Posted by Whatsleft at 2020-09-09 01:56 PM | Reply

With improved treatment lessening mortality, with precautionary measures in place, it may simply be possible to go back to some semblance of normal life.
#22 | POSTED BY WHATSLEFT

Aren't we already there? I'm in Southern California, former major hot spot, and we have gyms open (even indoors), restaurants are serving food indoors (yet, at limited capacity), and schools will be offering a hybrid option for students coming in October. And professional sports are going strong.

The only things that are not back to normal are college sports and wearing a mask. Is this really a life that you can't bear to experience moving forward? College football really was part of your everyday normalcy?

#23 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-09 02:10 PM | Reply

We have professional athletes whose careers are over, and some that died from heart issues after they "recovered" because of the lasting damage this virus does to a lot of our major organs. There's lots of examples:

www.google.com

I was just on a call (work) where an idiot said his wife's doctor said "we used a hammer to control this when all we needed was a fly-swatter." I don't know what kind of doctor would be that ignorant, but he's a Trump lover, so maybe they have a network of Earth II "professionals" they can go to.

#24 | Posted by YAV at 2020-09-09 02:14 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#24 - was for "I'm not certain that this virus is much worse than other miladies humans suffer"

#25 | Posted by YAV at 2020-09-09 02:15 PM | Reply

Aren't we already there?

#23 | POSTED BY RSTYBEACH11

In some ways we are there. But without competent leadership convincing the deniers to wear masks, we're still all living under this huge dark cloud of uncertainty. It may be easier in CA. But especially in cold states this winter, restaurants and bars will be dying at a truly alarming rate, because their seating capacity had been reduced by half. The entertainment industry is completely devastated, and may still not be profitable as it starts to return (I really miss live concerts).

"And professional sports are going strong." ..Are they? Pro and College sports are still losing a lot of revenue without butts in the seats. (I've been an NFL season ticket holder for decades. Probably no in person games this year, as my team is only likely to seat 10-15% at best in what is normally a sold-out stadium.) On game days those venues normally employ thousands of people. And we're not even talking about all of the bars and restaurants that survive because of game-day business.

Millions of support staff for the entertainment industry and live sports are still without jobs, with little hope in sight. Billions in cash flow is still not circulating in this economy. Much of it will be years before it returns.

#26 | Posted by Whatsleft at 2020-09-09 02:34 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"And professional sports are going strong." ..Are they? Pro and College sports are still losing a lot of revenue without butts in the seats.

College sports are not professional. And I don't believe college students should be pressured into playing sports at higher risk factors just so that a university can pull in more money.

Colleges and universities have an obligation to protect these individuals careers and potential professional sports futures, which I have seen nothing of. And I don't see anyone demanding these institutions to implement protections for students. Hell, these universities are demanding 100% tuition for the distance learning model. It's a down right sham!!!

And professional sports will survive without butts in the seats because advertising revenue has been the number one revenue stream for professional sports since the 90s. Nobody is claiming there will be zero butts in seats permanently. But, in all reality, what your describing is getting back to complete normal, not 'some semblance of normal life.'

IMO, we've been living that semblance of a normal life for the past couple months and it's down right comfortable for many of us. Don't get me wrong, the recession will continue throughout the winter and more than likely until we get an effective vaccine(s). But if there's a country on this planet that can withstand such a recession, it's the U.S.

If only we had leadership that is interested in protecting the middle class people and the peoples' finances more than the rich, more of us would be comfortable. You can blame Trump, McConnell, and the rest of the GOP for that. Despite the lack of that sort of support, the we are living the semblance. Just take a look around.

#27 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-09 03:15 PM | Reply

The for profit hospital industry is losing billions while flooded with work. Sure.

#5 | POSTED BY SITZKRIEG

They are.

The big money makers are elective procedures that have been put on hold because of COVID.

They even having trouble getting patients to see specialists like cardiologists because they're avoiding hospitals and clinics.

#28 | Posted by jpw at 2020-09-09 03:24 PM | Reply

If only we had leadership that is interested in protecting the middle class people and the peoples' finances more than the rich, more of us would be comfortable. You can blame Trump, McConnell, and the rest of the GOP for that.

How many Republicans realize that the Democrats passed a $3 trillion economic package 4 months ago that would have extended the unemployment boost, provided funding for needed front line PPE, would have provided funding for schools to implement physical safety measures to minimize the likelihood of spreading covid through in person learning, would provide cities and states all over America with needed funding for public services so that needed workers would not face layoffs in the middle of a pandemic - whose economic slowdown has caused tax revenues to plummet - and since many locales operate under balanced budget laws, if the federal government doesn't step in there is no other recourse but for firings and cuts to services?

The reality is that Mitch McConnell to this day refuses to even bring the House bill up for a vote, and all the problems and issues festering from the pandemic continue to negatively impact far too many American lives outside of those gaining even more wealth during the pandemic.

I guess as Trump said, "It is what it is," but make no bones about who lies at fault and who did what they could to address America's problems.

#29 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-09 03:33 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

As it works out, after months of learning how to treat it, COVID 19 may have genuinely been reduced to something no worse than many strains of influenza.
#22 | POSTED BY WHATSLEFT

Not even remotely close to true.

#30 | Posted by jpw at 2020-09-09 03:39 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 4

A couple comments based on other discussions...

What is the death toll from Sturgis? How do you define that? Does it mean just the people who were AT Sturgis or the ones they brought it home to and then died...

Second Item "With improved treatment lessening mortality, with precautionary measures in place, it may simply be possible to go back to some semblance of normal life.
#22 | POSTED BY WHATSLEFT"

There are a couple factors here. First in talking to my General Practitioner a couple weeks ago (I actually KNOW her and her family pretty well), the group of Doctors she consults with (local and coast to coast) SUSPECT the fewer severe cases and deaths over the summer have to do with lower virus loads and possibly sunshine. They are braced for the fall and winter though and praying it won't spiral again.

The second item is yes mortality is apparently down, HOWEVER - as other pointed out the long term issues are just bubbling to the surface. This isn't just those with severe cases requiring Oxygen or worse yet a ventilator. The latest estimate is roughly 20% of those who get ill suffer permanent heart damage but yes it is an early study. Think about that and what it will cost the US and Globe over say the next 60 or so years. How many people will die prematurely from it? It isn't like Polio where there was all too often very visible long term effects.

#31 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2020-09-09 05:08 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

These freedom-loving ass clowns should be shot.

#32 | Posted by Jaspar at 2020-09-09 08:06 PM | Reply

The methodology used appears to be quite sound and supported

#17 | POSTED BY TONYROMA AT 2020-09-09 11:55 AM | FLAG:

Only if you're a professional partisan activist. It's being slaughtered in peer review.

TLDR: "Essentially, the researchers assumed that new spikes in cases in areas where people went post-rally must have been caused by those rally attendees, despite there being no particular evidence that this was the case. The paper, which has not been peer-reviewed, failed to account for simultaneous happenings"like schools in South Dakota reopening, among other things"that could have contributed to coronavirus spread in some of the studied areas."

#33 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2020-09-10 09:10 AM | Reply

"The reality is that Mitch McConnell to this day refuses to even bring the House bill up for a vote, and all the problems and issues festering from the pandemic continue to negatively impact far too many American lives outside of those gaining even more wealth during the pandemic."

But at least Powell has artificially propped up the stock market so the 1% don't feel the pain.

#34 | Posted by danni at 2020-09-10 02:17 PM | Reply

There is no doubt that rally would be a super spreader event. But where do they get these figures?

"That dollar amount is based on another estimation that an average of $46,000 is spent on each patient who tests positive for COVID-19." come on......

#3 | POSTED BY EBERLY AT 2020-09-08 10:43 PM | FLAG: (CHOOSE)

Considering that some of the long haulers who spent a month in the ICU received bills in the millions of dollars, $46,000 seems like a bargain!

#35 | Posted by _Gunslinger_ at 2020-09-10 04:10 PM | Reply

"some of the long haulers who spent a month in the ICU"

How many?

Apparently it totals over $12 billion so there better have been hundreds and hundreds who did that.

#36 | Posted by eberly at 2020-09-10 04:23 PM | Reply

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