Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Monday, September 14, 2020

Roderick Walker's legs flailed as a Clayton County, Ga., sheriff deputy, who had pulled over the car he was riding in for a broken taillight, pinned him down on the street on Friday. While the officer leaned his full body weight onto Walker, who is Black, a second officer repeatedly punched his head. When the officers, both of whom are White, finally stood up, Walker was unconscious, his face bloodied and swollen as the deputies flipped him over and put his wrists in cuffs.

More

Comments

Admin's note: Participants in this discussion must follow the site's moderation policy. Profanity will be filtered. Abusive conduct is not allowed.

On Sunday, the Clayton County sheriff fired the officer seen punching Walker, 26, "for excessive use of force." Walker, who was charged with battery and obstructing officers, remains in custody, with the sheriff's office saying he can't be released due a felony probation warrant from another county.

But Shean Williams, his attorney, noted that he wasn't "detained or arrested for being on probation or having an open case in another county."

"Roderick Walker is in jail solely because he was illegally arrested after being assaulted by Clayton County Sheriff deputies, not because of anything he did during that incident or in the past," he said. "Mr. Walker would not be in jail if it were not for this unlawful arrest that violated his legal and constitutional rights."

Walker was a passenger riding in a Lyft which was pulled over by officers and then he was asked for identification.
When he questioned why, since he was a passenger, the officers ordered him to exit the car, Williams said. Soon more deputies arrived at the scene.

Moments later Walker was on the ground with one officer pinning him down as the other punched him. He became unconscious at least twice during the struggle, according to Williams. Bystanders, including Davis, began recording the altercation and videos soon circulated online.

In video of the incident, one officer accuses Walker of biting his hand " a claim Williams denied.

Passengering While Black obviously must be one of the crimes Trump would allow officers to mete out punishment for in advance. Just another day in America.

#1 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-14 06:29 AM | Reply

And cops wonder why nobody loves them. This was BS.

This was about flexing. Not about law enforcement.

#2 | Posted by Effeteposer at 2020-09-14 08:06 AM | Reply

These pieces of ---- will just be hired the next department over.

#3 | Posted by jpw at 2020-09-14 08:35 AM | Reply

My first observation is that both of these officers have the bulk of their bodyweight pressing on Walker, and they wonder why he continues to fight? Good lord, does anyone train these people on common sense and the human survival instinct?

The fact that Walker doesn't apparently want to die or be forced into unconsciousness - which of course he was unable to keep from happening allegedly twice - is deemed battery and obstructing officers?

These tactics are out of control.

#4 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-14 08:49 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Can the cops ask to see the ID of a passenger? For any reason?

In this case, they might suspect he has an outstanding warrant.

"he can't be released due a felony probation warrant from another county."

What does that mean? Does that mean they are supposed to arrest him?

They ask for his ID......then what happened?

#5 | Posted by eberly at 2020-09-14 08:54 AM | Reply

In this case, they might suspect he has an outstanding warrant.

How? He's a passenger in a Lyft. The only information the cops would have would be about the registered driver who was not related to the passenger.

You are making the case that simply being black is reasonable suspicion he has an outstanding warrant?

But Shean Williams, his attorney, noted he wasn't "detained or arrested for being on probation or having an open case in another county."

"Roderick Walker is in jail solely because he was illegally arrested after being assaulted by Clayton County Sheriff deputies, not because of anything he did during that incident or in the past," he said. "Mr. Walker would not be in jail if it were not for this unlawful arrest that violated his legal and constitutional rights."

Williams argued Walker never should have been arrested in the first place, saying deputies "lied and falsified a warrant for his arrest."

The Georgia NAACP also urged the district attorney's office to dismiss the charges against Walker and called for an independent investigation from the Georgia Bureau of Investigations.

As an officer of the court, I don't believe that an attorney can make such a scathing denial towards the police without being able to substantiate the claims, but I guess we'll see.

#6 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-14 09:04 AM | Reply

-You are making the case that simply being black is reasonable suspicion he has an outstanding warrant?

no. just asking if officers can simply ask for an ID, for whatever reason.

And if the passenger refuses to produce it and/or refuses to cooperate....officers can detain them?

Or is it an "unlawful arrest" like his attorney is alleging?

#7 | Posted by eberly at 2020-09-14 09:10 AM | Reply

#7

9th Circuit: Passengers in a car don't have to identify themselves

Passengers in a car stopped by police don't have to identify themselves, according to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.

That holds even in a state with a "stop and identify" law, and even if the initial stop of the car (for a traffic violation committed by the driver) was legal.

The opinion by a three-judge panel of the 9th Circuit earlier this month in US v. Landeros is one of the most significant decisions to date interpreting and applying the widely-misunderstood 2004 US Supreme Court decision in Hiibel v. Nevada.

Many police think that the Hiibel decision upheld the Constitutionality of requiring anyone stopped by police to show ID. But that's not what the Supreme Court actually said.

papersplease.org

#8 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-14 09:17 AM | Reply

8

Thank you....So the cops will have to contend there was another reason for the stop and the request to see his ID in order to cover their butts.

Thanks Tony....

#9 | Posted by eberly at 2020-09-14 09:25 AM | Reply

There is no other reason - this is what his attorney and the NAACP are saying. The cops arrested him on the spot for "battery and obstructing officers" - which unless the police used physical force on Walker first, there would have been no battery at all. Secondly, Walker couldn't "obstruct" because he was given an illegal order and subjected to illegal use of force by the police, since they had no right to demand he produce ID in the first place.

#10 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-14 09:34 AM | Reply

Jeepers. And the cops still can't figure out why anyone may want to start taking shots at them? It sure is a stumper.

#11 | Posted by Sezu at 2020-09-14 09:43 AM | Reply

But it's the people who protest against this crap that are the problem, right?

#12 | Posted by WhoDaMan at 2020-09-14 10:26 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Well that's a good look for Grunt Style products.

#13 | Posted by SunTzuMeow at 2020-09-14 01:33 PM | Reply

Question remains: Had there been no witnesses recording this incident and the video subsequently going viral, would these officers have been fired?

#14 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-14 01:38 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"Can the cops ask to see the ID of a passenger? For any reason?"

They can ask...

In State v. Williams, 264 Ga. App. 199 (2003), the Georgia Court of Appeals clarified that passengers in a stopped vehicle who are detained by the stop, but are not suspected of any violation or other criminal activity, may be asked for identification by an officer; however, the officer may not convey any message that a response is required. See also Holt v. State, 227 Ga. App. 46 (1997) and Edgell v. State, 253 Ga. App. 775, 777-778 (2002). Although an officer may not take the passenger's mere refusal to answer as providing reasonable suspicion of other criminal activity (see Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1 at 34 (1968) (White, J., concurring)), the refusal may lead the officer to take additional safety precautions and / or to conclude that the passenger is in violation of O.C.G.A. 16-11-36(a). Once an officer develops reasonable articulable suspicion to believe that a passenger is engaged in criminal activity, they may detain him or her and request identification. www.wcsoga.com

#15 | Posted by snoofy at 2020-09-14 01:40 PM | Reply

We have all watched those police shows where they ask for identification of everyone in the vehicle if you refuse to give it they have to detain you until they can identify you. Refusing to give identification makes everyone's life difficult. I don't know about the rest of you but if an officer asks me for my ID I'm going to give it to him. Not because I'm afraid I'm going to get my ass kicked but because that's the right thing to do

#16 | Posted by penguinhead at 2020-09-14 01:41 PM | Reply

Refusing to give identification makes everyone's life difficult.

So not carrying any ID because you aren't even driving justifies a police beatdown?

Initially, Walker was asked to provide identification to the deputies, Williams said, but Walker told them that he didn't have any on him since he wasn't driving.

"They became upset when he asked, Why are you asking for my ID? I'm not driving and I haven't done anything wrong,'" Williams said, according to Atlanta station WSB-TV.

www.huffpost.com

There is no excuse for what the police did to this man. That is likely why the officer was summarily fired even before any investigation or reports have been completed. The video itself was more than enough for his superiors.

Why isn't it enough for you?

#17 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-14 05:16 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Cops are dumb thugs, break the law and get fired.

#18 | Posted by bored at 2020-09-15 04:13 AM | Reply

"Good lord, does anyone train these people on common sense and the human survival instinct?"

Training issue???? Ridiculous. It's a screening issue. Neither one of those two officers should ever have been allowed to be police officers. They are just simply bullies who use their badges to give them permission to bully people. I'll guarantee you that they have a history of bullying going all the way back to their middle school years.

#19 | Posted by danni at 2020-09-15 08:38 AM | Reply

what Danni said...

Good Ole Boys, hiring Good Ole Boys,
for racist laughs and the general malaise of
caring... It's all B.S., and seen in far
too many police stations across America.

#20 | Posted by earthmuse at 2020-09-16 05:40 AM | Reply

Comments are closed for this entry.

Home | Breaking News | Comments | User Blogs | Stats | Back Page | RSS Feed | RSS Spec | DMCA Compliance | Privacy | Copyright 2020 World Readable

Drudge Retort