Advertisement

Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Actions by police officers, including witness tampering, violent interrogations and falsifying evidence, account for the majority of the misconduct that lead to wrongful convictions, according to a study released Tuesday by the National Registry of Exonerations that focused on the role police and prosecutors play in false convictions in the U.S.

More

Comments

Admin's note: Participants in this discussion must follow the site's moderation policy. Profanity will be filtered. Abusive conduct is not allowed.

More from the article

Researchers also found that misconduct by police and prosecutors is among the leading causes of disproportionate false conviction of Black defendants. For example, 78% of Black defendants who were wrongly accused of murder were convicted because of some type of misconduct. That number is 64% for white defendants, according to the study. An even wider gap: 87% of Black defendants who were sentenced to death were victims of official misconduct. That number is 68% for white defendants.

Still, reforms have happened in the past several years.

For example, violent interrogations have become less common in the past 15 to 20 years, in large part, after more and more states began requiring police departments to record interrogations.


#1 | Posted by FedUpWithPols at 2020-09-15 06:50 AM | Reply

The screening of those who we allow to be police officers needs to be much stronger. We are allowing psychopaths to be police officers, that has to change. If it takes a thorough reorganization, some rescreening of existing officers, etc. then let's get busy and do it. Yeah, we may need to fire and replace many police officers who should never have been police officers in the first place. When anyone goes out of their way to convict an innocent person then that officer should definitely not be on the police force and probably should be prosecuted for the crimes involved i persuing a wrongful conviction.

#2 | Posted by danni at 2020-09-15 08:10 AM | Reply

"If it takes a thorough reorganization, some rescreening of existing officers, etc. then let's get busy and do it."

You wouldn't have to just eliminate the officers directly involved in the misconduct but also those who supervised those officers and were not competent enough to realize that dishonest police work was happening. At least there is ostensibly a mechanism for achieving that. But when it comes to prosecutors we're probably SOL.

#3 | Posted by Hagbard_Celine at 2020-09-15 08:37 AM | Reply

A Florida cop planted meth on random drivers, police say. One lost custody of his daughter.
www.washingtonpost.com

Baltimore Police Caught Planting Drugs In Body-Cam Footage, Public Defender Says
www.npr.org

#4 | Posted by LampLighter at 2020-09-15 09:21 AM | Reply

@#3 ... You wouldn't have to just eliminate the officers directly involved in the misconduct but also those who supervised those officers ...

As the saying goes... one bad apple spoils the entire bushel.

#5 | Posted by LampLighter at 2020-09-15 09:21 AM | Reply

@#4

The Baltimore one is particularly egregious.

The officer turns on his body cam to record his discovery of the drugs. Well, I'll let the article go on from here...

...The recording is from the afternoon of Jan. 24, when the officer, Richard Pinheiro, was standing in the trash-strewn backyard of a row house along with two other officers. At the start of the footage, Pinheiro is seen holding a soup can with a clear plastic bag stuffed into it. He then places the can among rubbish, before leading the other officers out of the narrow access alley.

On the sidewalk, Pinheiro activates his body-cam " apparently unaware that the device would also preserve his earlier actions. "Police cameras have a feature that saves the 30 seconds of video before activation, but without audio," The Baltimore Sun reports.

"I'm gonna go check here, hold on," the officer tells his colleagues, walking back to the property " and seeming to spark laughter from his fellow officers. After a "search" that lasts about 15 seconds, he picks up the soup can, pulls out the plastic bag and displays it to the camera, showing that it's holding white capsules.

"Yo," he yells. "Hold up."...



#6 | Posted by LampLighter at 2020-09-15 09:25 AM | Reply

I don't know if I am alone in this thought but when I think of wrongful conviction I do think of Texas.

#7 | Posted by danni at 2020-09-16 08:22 AM | Reply

I think that if a police officer or a prosecutor knowingly gets someone convicted of a crime that police officer or that prosecutor should have to serve the sentence they tried to inflict on an innocent person. If, in some states, it is the death penalty.then they should be put to death. Convicting some of a crime that you know they did not convice is probably the worst crime possible and should be dealt with as such.

#8 | Posted by danni at 2020-09-16 08:28 AM | Reply

7

Texas is host to all sorts of outrageous jury verdicts on the civil side as well.

#9 | Posted by eberly at 2020-09-16 08:35 AM | Reply

"Since 1973, more than 170 individuals " including 13 people in Texas " have been released from death rows nationwide due to evidence of their wrongful conviction.

There also is strong evidence that the State of Texas has executed innocent people, including Carlos DeLuna, Ruben Cantu, Cameron Todd Willingham, Gary Graham (Shaka Sankofa), and most recently, Larry Swearingen, who was put to death in August 2019."

tcadp.org

My biggest objection to the death penalty is the finality of it. When a person is convicted wrongly and then executed there is no way to restore them to life. We shouldn't have irreversible punishments.

#10 | Posted by danni at 2020-09-16 11:03 AM | Reply

Well duh.

#11 | Posted by snoofy at 2020-09-16 01:46 PM | Reply

Texas is host to all sorts of outrageous jury verdicts on the civil side as well.
#9 | POSTED BY EBERLY

And that's why Texas has tort reform.
So the verdicts are outrageous to common people, and very favorable to business interests.

#12 | Posted by snoofy at 2020-09-16 01:49 PM | Reply

"The screening of those who we allow to be police officers needs to be much stronger"

They already reject candidates whose IQ is too high.
You don't think that's sufficient? ;)

#13 | Posted by snoofy at 2020-09-16 01:50 PM | Reply

This is also why the oft-quoted statistics about Blacks committing more crimes are not useful. It's also part of the reason why the police-involved shooting statistics are suspect - especially the self-reporting of the shooting victim being armed. I can't find the cases now, but I do remember discussion of several cases where police were either caught or confessed to planting "burner" guns on people they had shot. The Rampart Division scandal is an obvious one. I know there have been others that aren't coming immediately to mind, and there is no way to know how common this sort of thing is.

Obviously, in the example of the Baltimore officer planting drugs his fellow officers weren't going to report it, so we can't trust that most occurrences would be reported by fellow officers. That would indicate that the known cases are probably a small fraction of the actual cases where this happens. How many times did that officer do the same thing before there were body cameras? We do know in cases like the Rampart Division the corruption was massive. The officers had a pattern of misbehavior that had continued unabated for years, tainting hundreds of cases.

#14 | Posted by StatsPlease at 2020-09-16 05:15 PM | Reply

The following HTML tags are allowed in comments: a href, b, i, p, br, ul, ol, li and blockquote. Others will be stripped out. Participants in this discussion must follow the site's moderation policy. Profanity will be filtered. Abusive conduct is not allowed.

Anyone can join this site and make comments. To post this comment, you must sign it with your Drudge Retort username. If you can't remember your username or password, use the lost password form to request it.
Username:
Password:

Home | Breaking News | Comments | User Blogs | Stats | Back Page | RSS Feed | RSS Spec | DMCA Compliance | Privacy | Copyright 2020 World Readable

Drudge Retort