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Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Wednesday, September 16, 2020

Officials in Rochester, N.Y., spent months trying to suppress video footage of the police encounter that led to Mr. Prude's death. "We certainly do not want people to misinterpret the officers' actions and conflate this incident with any recent killings of unarmed Black men by law enforcement nationally," a deputy Rochester police chief wrote in an email to his boss. His advice was clear: Don't release the body camera footage to the Prude family's lawyer. The police chief replied minutes later: "I totally agree."

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The June 4 exchange was contained in a mass of city documents released on Monday that show how the police chief, La'Ron Singletary, and other prominent Rochester officials did everything in their power to keep the troubling videos of the incident out of public view, and to prevent damaging fallout from Mr. Prude's death.

The documents show how the police attempted to frame the narrative in the earliest hours, playing up Mr. Prude's potential for danger and glossing over the tactics of the officers who pinned him, naked and hooded, to the ground before he stopped breathing.

In a police report on the confrontation, marking a box for "victim type," an officer on the scene listed Mr. Prude " who the police believed had broken a store window that night " simply as an "individual." But another officer circled the word in red and scribbled a note.

"Make him a suspect," it read.

For those who don't believe that the police sing from the same hymnal, then these documents will upset that denial at least for this case. On the day that the City of Louisville does the right thing by settling the wrongful death of Breonna Taylor which includes making significant changes in future police tactics and policies, we find out that the Rochester police - from their chief on down - actively and willfully obstructed justice in the murder of Daniel Prude, allegedly out of their fear of creating their own George Floyd protest situation - something they truly are facing after their attempts failed.

We have so many problems in America right now, starting with the frightened bully/buffoon masquerading as the POTUS, but systemic police and justice reform has got to be placed front and center from this point forward until tactics such as these aren't even considered, much less enacted. These officials obstructed justice as sure as the day is long, and they must be held accountable for their actions.

#1 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-15 08:03 PM | Reply

... His advice was clear: Don't release the body camera footage to the Prude family's lawyer. The police chief replied minutes later: "I totally agree." ...

This apparently intentional hiding of evidence by those who are tasked with enforcing the law is not good.

It makes me wonder what other "leadership" that police chief has given to those he oversees.


#2 | Posted by LampLighter at 2020-09-15 08:12 PM | Reply

Rochester police - from their chief on down - actively and willfully obstructed justice

^
RstyBeach11, still going with "less than ten percent?"

#3 | Posted by snoofy at 2020-09-15 08:15 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

RstyBeach11, still going with "less than ten percent?"
#3 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

Despicably, that's all it takes.

#4 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-15 08:30 PM | Reply

... His advice was clear: Don't release the body camera footage to the Prude family's lawyer. The police chief replied minutes later: "I totally agree." ...

Rochester just might be bankrupt after the civil suit against their PD finally pays out.

#5 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-15 08:33 PM | Reply

Rochester just might be bankrupt after the civil suit against their PD finally pays out.

I want to see both the chief and the deputy charged with obstruction and conspiracy to commit obstruction and both sentenced to prison along with anyone else complicit in the active cover up.

This is about as egregious as conduct can get by law enforcement officials and not just the responding cops involved in the actual incident imo.

#6 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-15 08:41 PM | Reply

RstyBeach11, still going with "less than ten percent?"
#3 | POSTED BY SNOOFY
Despicably, that's all it takes.

I think it takes a lot more than that.

It sure seems like 100% of police either actively provide cover for, or simply ignore, the racists and bullies among them, doesn't it?

Like the three that stood around with their hands in their pockets while one kill George Floyd, yeah?

Like the entire Rochester PD.

#7 | Posted by snoofy at 2020-09-15 08:50 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

This is about as egregious as conduct can get by law enforcement officials and not just the responding cops involved in the actual incident imo.
#6 | POSTED BY TONYROMA

This is the system working against justice, against the people.

More protests are justified. The system brings consternation upon itself.

When will the bootlickers take notice?

#8 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-15 08:50 PM | Reply

If Rochester goes bankrupt, who pays the police pensions?

#9 | Posted by bored at 2020-09-15 08:54 PM | Reply

It sure seems like 100% of police either actively provide cover for, or simply ignore, the racists and bullies among them, doesn't it?
#7 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

Yes. Ultimately, that was the point I was trying to make on the other thread regarding the majority feeling obligated to toe the thin blue line in favor of a minority of racist/corrupt law enforcement.

However, I do not believe that 100%, nay even 25%-50%, of law enforcement (even those in Rochester) are outright racists/corrupt. A small fraction of the entire force hold the vast majority of the rest hostage (apologies for the redundancy, but this is a separate thread).

#10 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-15 08:57 PM | Reply

Like the entire Rochester PD.
#7 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

I know you've seen the reports about SoCal Sheriff's department having a "gang" of officers with tattoos and everything. Initiation amounts to killing a local gang member.

Have you seen the interviews of the cops that have outed the "gang"? These guys are in fear of their lives if they don't toe the line. The fear of this "gang" within the Sheriff's department is on the level of murder; there is no reason to believe these officers have the kind of influence over street criminals to "pinch" them into a position where it would be far more advantageous to kill off a Sheriff Deputy than to not.

Get my drift? Apparently, this is the culture that a small few implement to keep the many in line.

#11 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-15 09:01 PM | Reply

there is no reason to believe these officers have the kind of influence over street criminals to "pinch" them into a position where it would be far more advantageous to kill off a Sheriff Deputy than to not.

Which brings me to the question, do you think this weekend's walk up attempted execution might have been a case of just that - someone in the police department putting out a hit on a cop(s) who were planning on testifying against other officers - or involved in a case where the suspects didn't want them to show?

Not being in SoCal, I have no idea, but what you just said sparked my curiosity. And the perverse kicker is of course that those in trouble will make sure the shooter never sees the inside of a courtroom, thereby closing the circle.

Frankly, it wouldn't surprise me one bit if it were a conspiracy of some sort. You normally don't see executions like that simply out of the clear blue sky.

#12 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-15 09:13 PM | Reply

Frankly, it wouldn't surprise me one bit if it were a conspiracy of some sort. You normally don't see executions like that simply out of the clear blue sky.
#12 | POSTED BY TONYROMA

Oh it's a conspiracy alright. Mainly on a cultural level without widespread organization. The actual organization is local, which is the scariest part.

Poor comparison, but one that immediately springs to mind: This isn't the Taliban attacking (i.e., organized group), this is Al Qaueda (i.e., ideology needed only).

#13 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-15 09:17 PM | Reply

If Rochester goes bankrupt, who pays the police pensions?
#9 | POSTED BY BORED

Tax payers as those pensions are codified by law.

#14 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-15 09:18 PM | Reply

there is no reason to believe these officers have the kind of influence over street criminals to "pinch" them into a position where it would be far more advantageous to kill off a Sheriff Deputy than to not.
Get my drift? Apparently, this is the culture that a small few implement to keep the many in line.
#11 | POSTED BY RSTYBEACH11

EDIT:

There is no reason NOT to believe these officers have the kind of influence over street criminals to "pinch" them into a position where it would be far more advantageous to kill off a Sheriff Deputy than to not.

#15 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-15 09:19 PM | Reply

What do you think motivated the specific shooting? Was it about those two cops?

#16 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-15 09:51 PM | Reply

Questions that just popped into my mind as I read this...

Why is it that the police departments are the ones who determine whether or not videos of police acting badly are released to the lawyers of accused, the public, etc.?

Why do the police departments hold the sole ownership of potential evidence against poorly-behavig police officers?



#17 | Posted by LampLighter at 2020-09-15 09:58 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

What do you think motivated the specific shooting? Was it about those two cops?
#16 | POSTED BY TONYROMA

Which brings me to the question, do you think this weekend's walk up attempted execution might have been a case of just that - someone in the police department putting out a hit on a cop(s) who were planning on testifying against other officers - or involved in a case where the suspects didn't want them to show?

After watching the interview with the whistle blower cop, I wouldn't put it past them. These insider groups are going to feel as though their backs are up against the wall. You only see these folks behave so outwardly when there is movement towards, or even suggestions of, criminal justice reform, especially that tied to policing.

Then you include the union side of it, you're talking about livelihoods and pensions...people get really sensitive, which in combination with the innate paranoia involved with these inside groups' power as it relates to 'pinching' known criminals (even suspected murderers) to join in on the insider groups' corrupt behavior, really sets a difficult environment to enter, exist, and/or reform.

#18 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-15 10:00 PM | Reply

Why do the police departments hold the sole ownership of potential evidence against poorly-behavig police officers?

Technically, they don't. However, I believe that the police unions negotiate when and under what circumstances body-cam/dash-cam video can be used and released since it involves their members.

Strong local and state government (state police), or legislatures can also set the conditions for video use and release I think. But with city/county police departments I think it's usually the combination of the mayor/city council/police administration and the police unions who agree to the conditions that video operates under.

#19 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-15 10:23 PM | Reply

After watching the interview with the whistle blower cop,

What whistle blower cop? This is why I'm asking you. I don't know what's going on locally. It seems you're answering my questions as though I have some baseline of inside/local information.

Trust me, I don't. (Links are fine to articles - you don't have to write volumes about this if other sources exist)

Thanks.

#20 | Posted by tonyroma at 2020-09-15 10:26 PM | Reply

@#19 ... However, I believe that the police unions negotiate when and under what circumstances body-cam/dash-cam video can be used and released since it involves their members. ...

Availability of evidence of how well police are performing should not be subject to union negotiations.

The police are there to protect and serve the people. The people should own those videos, not the police union.

Ownership and control of the videos should be a government department outside of that government's police department.


#21 | Posted by LampLighter at 2020-09-15 11:04 PM | Reply

FTA: "Mr. Simmons, the deputy chief who urged the videos not be released, was demoted to a lieutenant last week. The demotion did not last long: On Monday, he was named acting police chief."

#22 | Posted by qcp at 2020-09-17 08:32 AM | Reply


Just ran across this article this morning...

AI could help root out bad cops -- if only the police allowed it
www.fastcompany.com

...Amid urgent calls for police reform in the wake of George Floyd's death, Axon CEO Rick Smith is betting on AI, VR, and new ways of analyzing body-cam footage. ...

In a patent application filed last month, Axon engineers describe searching not only for words and locations but also for clothing, weapons, buildings, and other objects. AI could also tag footage to enable searches for things such as "the characteristics [of] the sounds or words of the audio," including "the volume (e.g., intensity), tone (e.g., menacing, threatening, helpful, kind), frequency range, or emotions (e.g., anger, elation) of a word or a sound."...

Smith also faces a more low-tech challenge: making his ideas acceptable not only to often intransigent police unions but also to the communities those police serve. Police officers aren't exactly clamoring for more scrutiny, especially if it's being done by a computer. And many of those communities aren't calling for more technology for their police but for deep reform, if not deep budget cuts....


Interesting idea, but I doubt if we'll see anything of it in the next decade.

#23 | Posted by LampLighter at 2020-09-17 10:07 AM | Reply

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