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Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Wednesday, September 23, 2020

A Jefferson County grand jury has indicted one of three Louisville officers in the March 13 fatal police shooting of 26-year-old Breonna Taylor.

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All three officers should have been indicted for Wanton Endangerment. Let a jury then figure out if it can be proven beyond reasonable doubt. Indicting just one officer, and the lowest ranking one at that, smells of cover-up and holding the lowest person on the totem pole wholly responsible.

On the other hand, I am not offended at the failure to indict for murder. The facts, disturbing as they are, do not add up to murder.

#1 | Posted by moder8 at 2020-09-23 02:53 PM | Reply

It is clearer to me now that as the laws are currently written, a police officer can kill a black man and not face murder or manslaughter charges of any sort so long as the killing is done while arguably "carrying out their duties". It's a f****** joke. The problem is that the powerful police unions and obsequious politicians have made cops almost untouchable. The laws are designed to make a cop almost bullet proof from prosecution no matter how over the top the killing of a black person is. At this point are the really any different than the Mexican Federales or the law enforcement thugs in dozens of other third world countries?

Final thought: Do any of us really believe that Breonna Taylor would have been shot to death with no real legal consequences for the cops had she been a white woman in her suburban home?

#2 | Posted by moder8 at 2020-09-23 04:03 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

A question I have not yet seen a complete answer to is: why did the police make the mistake of going into the wrong apartment in the first place?

Once that cause is determined, what will be done to prevent its recurrence?

That one mistake triggered a series of mortal events.

#3 | Posted by LampLighter at 2020-09-23 04:11 PM | Reply

Do any of us really believe that Breonna Taylor would have been shot to death with no real legal consequences for the cops had she been a white woman in her suburban home?
#2 | POSTED BY MODER8

Recent events suggest no: www.bbc.com

But, the cop was black, so...

#4 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-23 04:19 PM | Reply

It turns out the neighbors next door are white. The cop is in trouble for random bullets that entered the white apartment. A black family lives in the apartment upstairs from Taylor's. Bullets entered their apartment also. They aren't in the indictment.

#5 | Posted by lee_the_agent at 2020-09-23 04:43 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#3

It's been determined.

www.cnn.com

#6 | Posted by lee_the_agent at 2020-09-23 04:45 PM | Reply

@#6

Thanks. But I was speaking more of an official investigation and determination.

#7 | Posted by LampLighter at 2020-09-23 07:17 PM | Reply

Guess the cops had to sacrifice someone

Sure sucks to be that guy.

He really drew the short straw this life. Born black and now this.

Does not seem fair to pin it all on him. Guess he should have thought of that before he was born black and all.

I don't think the people on the streets are going to be happy about this.

Nope. Not happy at all.

#8 | Posted by donnerboy at 2020-09-23 07:29 PM | Reply

Token bad cop. Bummer all around. The white cops walk.

#9 | Posted by Effeteposer at 2020-09-23 10:58 PM | Reply

#8

Not at all. They'll do the adult version of laying on their back kicking and screaming.

#10 | Posted by willowby at 2020-09-23 11:07 PM | Reply

#9

What bad cop? They were fired at and one was wounded. If it was me, I would have emptied my entire magazine and had one to reload.

#11 | Posted by willowby at 2020-09-23 11:10 PM | Reply

A question I have not yet seen a complete answer to is: why did the police make the mistake of going into the wrong apartment in the first place?

The police were at the RIGHT apartment but at the WRONG TIME. At one time, the man they were looking for, Taylor's previous boyfriend, used to live at that apartment. I haven't heard when he moved out. In any event, the previous boyfriend was ALREADY IN POLICE CUSTODY at the time of the raid.

What's even more troubling is that an attempt was made to get the previous boyfriend to Taylor in his criminal activities. The boyfriend refused.

During the televised statement yesterday, the AG stated that even though the police had a No Knock warrant, they knocked and announced themselves. This is non-sense! Why would they do that? But, one civilian came forth to state that the police did knock and announce themselves. However, what's missing from the AG's statement was that multiple other witnesses, including the current boyfriend, said they did not knock or announce themselves. When you consider that someone unsuccessfully tried to get Taylor's previous boyfriend to implicate her, it makes you wonder whether or not they incentivized someone to state that the police did not. By not having a trial, Taylor's attorney can not get to assess the truthiness of the lone witness to the knock and announcement.

Finally, the current boyfriend was initially charged but later released. They also falsified the police report. If the police did it fact knock and announce their presence, I would expect the current boyfriend will be re-arrested and charged with interference in the lawful execution of a warrant. I suspect that he won't be charged because then his attorney would rip a gaping hole in the AG's decision. If I were a member of Taylor's family, I would use some of the proceeds of the settlement to pay the attorney fees of the current boyfriend so that he can sue the PD and expose the injustice that has taken place.

#12 | Posted by FedUpWithPols at 2020-09-24 08:13 AM | Reply

And they wonder why people say f*** the police

#13 | Posted by hamburglar at 2020-09-24 08:32 AM | Reply

Any here read the Grand Jury report? Did your opinion differ at all after reading it if you have?

#14 | Posted by kwrx25 at 2020-09-24 10:14 AM | Reply

What bad cop? They were fired at and one was wounded. If it was me, I would have emptied my entire magazine and had one to reload.

#11 | POSTED BY WILLOWBY

So you just come out and admit you would be a bad cop too.

Well done comrade.

#15 | Posted by donnerboy at 2020-09-24 10:21 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

if you were fired on you wouldn't return fire Donner?... so you admit you'd be a dead cop?

#16 | Posted by kwrx25 at 2020-09-24 10:26 AM | Reply

if you were fired on you wouldn't return fire Donner?... so you admit you'd be a dead cop?

#16 | POSTED BY KWRX25

No. Not unless I can see what i am shooting at.

The officers overreacted. Obviously.

So they charged one with shooting wantonly thru apt walls but not for shooting wantonly thru her body.

That is just completely ridiculous and disgusting.

#17 | Posted by donnerboy at 2020-09-24 10:34 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

He saw two people at the end of the hall, one in a firing stance, a boom, and pain and hot wetness on his leg... He shot back at the person in the firing stance.

If true, please tell me the proper response?

#18 | Posted by kwrx25 at 2020-09-24 10:38 AM | Reply

is someone has a gun and is shootin at police, and they are shooting back at them... but some third cop is firing in random directions.... you think it's inappropriate to charge just the third cop?

That's pretty stupid.

#19 | Posted by kwrx25 at 2020-09-24 10:39 AM | Reply

What bad cop? They were fired at and one was wounded. If it was me, I would have emptied my entire magazine and had one to reload.

#11 | POSTED BY WILLOWBY

If you kick down somebody's door in the middle of the night you better expect to be shot at.

As for the rest of your comment it's just bluster from an internet warrior.

#20 | Posted by jpw at 2020-09-24 10:50 AM | Reply

If true, please tell me the proper response?

#18 | POSTED BY KWRX25

Here's a better idea.

Look up what would happen to a civilian who, in during an action of self-defense (being generous here...don't think the cops have the right to claim self-defense here), emptied a mag into two other adjacent dwellings.

Now, in that thought experiment the person defending themselves has to white.

This is what happens if you fire any shots as a black person defending yourself.

abcnews.go.com

#21 | Posted by jpw at 2020-09-24 10:55 AM | Reply

Here's a better idea, answer the question asked rather than "answering" another question with supposition.

#22 | Posted by kwrx25 at 2020-09-24 10:59 AM | Reply

The answer is there if you're smart enough to see it.

But I guess you need it spelled out.

No, the proper response is not to spray and pray. Cops are supposedly professionals with the training and tools to handle situations like this. Don't you think we should be holding them to at least the same standard we hold civilians?

#23 | Posted by jpw at 2020-09-24 11:56 AM | Reply

So you mean to tell me that if the cop charged with shooting "wantonly" had actually fired all those wanton shots directly and accurately into the body of Breanna then he would not have been charged at all??

That is just insanity. I agree there is no justice there.

I wouldnt be surprised if they didnt try to burn down the whole city after that weak crap.

I hope they don't go crazy but seriously. I would not be surprised.

#24 | Posted by donnerboy at 2020-09-24 12:07 PM | Reply

#24 That's exactly what I'm saying, and it's why the other two officers are not being indicted. Their shots were directly at the source of the threat.

#25 | Posted by kwrx25 at 2020-09-24 12:49 PM | Reply

"Their shots were directly at the source of the threat.

#25 | POSTED BY KWRX25 AT 2020-09-24 12:49 PM | FLAG: "

Were they?

6 shots hit and killed Taylor, who was innocent as far as I can tell and in her own apartment. Why are these shots, which were fatally off target, deemed unworthy of prosecution and those off target and hitting other property are prosecuted?

And Kentucky has a stand your ground law, so the boyfriend would have been within his rights to use a firearm to protect himself and Taylor during a home invasion. This issue hinges on whether or not the police identified themselves - I would not bet on the police having followed correct identification procedure given that they don't seem to have got anything else right in this operation.

These police officers should face a jury of their peers. If they are manifestly innocent, let a jury say so and let everyone see the process of justice working.

#26 | Posted by Foreigner at 2020-09-24 02:05 PM | Reply

They did, in the grand jury, the one that heard evidence that they did announce themselves, even though they did have a no knock warrant. Have you read anything fact based on this case before voicing an opinion Foreigner?

#27 | Posted by kwrx25 at 2020-09-24 02:12 PM | Reply

Records show the warrant police used to enter Taylor's apartment connected her with a narcotics suspect, Jamarcus Glover, who was arrested in a separate raid that night at a house 10 miles away.

A detective wrote in an affidavit that he'd seen Glover leave Taylor's apartment about two months before with a USPS package before driving to a "known drug house." The detective wrote that he then verified "through a US Postal Inspector" that Glover had been receiving packages at Taylor's address.

A U.S. postal inspector in Louisville, however, told WDRB News Friday that LMPD didn't use his office to verify that Glover was receiving packages at Taylor's apartment.

Postal inspector Tony Gooden told WDRB that a different agency had asked in January to look into whether Taylor's home was receiving suspicious mail, but that the office had concluded it wasn't.
www.courier-journal.com

hmmmm...

bad cop, no donut.

#28 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-24 02:42 PM | Reply

" Have you read anything fact based on this case before voicing an opinion Foreigner?

#27 | POSTED BY KWRX25 AT 2020-09-24 02:12 PM | REPLY | FLAG:"

I have, have you?

My reading indicates that there were 12 witnesses present and only 1 heard the police announce themselves. The other 11 did not corroborate the police account.

This article sets it out:

thehill.com

Your understanding of Grand Jury processes seems a bit off too. It is not a full trial with both parties presenting evidence and getting to cross examine. The process is held in secret, has only the jury, prosecutor, stenographer and any summoned witnesses. There is no defense attorney.

So your suggestion that the officers have already faced a jury of their peers is incorrect. I'm not commenting on whether or not the police officers are guilty. I giving my opinion that the officers should face a full jury trial.

#29 | Posted by Foreigner at 2020-09-24 03:31 PM | Reply

#29 | POSTED BY FOREIGNER

Holy shht!

You are brutal with your use of facts and citations.

Keep up the good work Foreigner.

I've been enjoying reading your posts.

#30 | Posted by ClownShack at 2020-09-24 03:44 PM | Reply

I understand that's how it works, and your correct, a jury weighed in on the evidence at hand and decided that there wasn't enough to move forward with a trial.

I've heard that there were 12 witnesses and only 1 said they heard the no knock, but I've also been busy and haven't been able to hunt down anything more than internet hearsay source for that, and as you point out, it's done in secrecy so where were you able to get a solid source on that 11/12 number I'd love to get more information on it.

I hear you on your point that there should be a trial, or understand where you are coming from. This is a legit question since you've obviously given this thought and not just knee jerk reaction. As distasteful a no knock warrant is, they do exist and was granted here (used or not is in question)... but let's assume they were granted it, and didn't knock. They enter legally under the warrant, are fired upon and return fire legally. Shouldn't the anger be at the system, and demands
on that to change, and not a push to charge the officers who operated legally? If not, where do you think they deviated from reacting in a legal fashion?

#31 | Posted by kwrx25 at 2020-09-24 04:18 PM | Reply

Shouldn't the anger be at the system, and demands on that to change, and not a push to charge the officers who operated legally?
#31 | POSTED BY KWRX25

That's more or less where I'm at with the situation. The legal status-quo will protect these officers, which is what needs to be changed. And apparently, as part of the settlement with Taylor's family, reforms are mandated.

Problem I have with the warrant filing process is that there's evidence that one of the officers falsified corroboration that Taylor was receiving packages from the suspect in question via USPS and that corroboration came from USPS. Report is there was no corroboration that came from USPS, the officers didn't even inquire. So they completely fabricated that piece of evidence on the warrant, leading to Taylor's death. I believe this allegation is being investigated by the FBI, but as reported in #28, it seems pretty damning, IMO.

Side note, what's your opinion on the notion that once police bust down your down and announce themselves, your rights to protect yourself, your family, and your home go right out the window.

This really is unconstitutional considering the hearing impaired do exist in our society and do own guns.

#32 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-24 05:01 PM | Reply

" If not, where do you think they deviated from reacting in a legal fashion?

#31 | POSTED BY KWRX25 AT 2020-09-24 04:18 PM | FLAG: "

In this case the officers were advised by superiors to knock and announce their presence in serving this specific search warrant. This was disclosed by the Attorney General in a press conference after the decision was made public.

If they failed to follow this instruction, there are serious implications. Did they enter legally under the warrant, as you suggest, or does failure to follow the instruction render subsequent actions illegal, particularly the use of deadly force? Does it allow Taylor's boyfriend to claim he was legally following Kentucky's stand your ground law?

I don't know the answer to these questions, but it seems to me the legality of the officers' actions hinge on whether they followed instructions to announce themselves. The police officers are hardly independent witnesses when it comes to testimony concerning whether or not they followed instructions, so the testimony of independent witnesses becomes vital.

If 1 witness corroborates their position on this key issue and 11 don't, isn't that enough doubt to suggest a case should be brought against them?

I have 1 caveat and that is that if failure to follow the instruction to announce themselves does not render the execution of the warrant illegal, then whether or not they followed instructions is moot.

#33 | Posted by Foreigner at 2020-09-24 06:25 PM | Reply

I have 1 caveat and that is that if failure to follow the instruction to announce themselves does not render the execution of the warrant illegal, then whether or not they followed instructions is moot.
#33 | POSTED BY FOREIGNER

What about if the warrant was filed on false pretenses even before executing the raid?

#34 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-24 06:34 PM | Reply

#34 - I saw your posts and I almost included a reference to them in my response, but I didn't because I was voicing my opinion only on the execution of it.

My understanding is that the officers involved in the shooting were not responsible for the possible illegal obtaining of the warrant, there is no indication that they knew the warrant was possibly illegally obtained and they acted on it in good faith.

If the warrant was illegally obtained as you suggest may be the case, then I would expect charges to be filed against those responsible. I think I read that the FBI is looking into this.

#35 | Posted by Foreigner at 2020-09-24 07:52 PM | Reply

My understanding is that the officers involved in the shooting were not responsible for the possible illegal obtaining of the warrant, there is no indication that they knew the warrant was possibly illegally obtained and they acted on it in good faith.
If the warrant was illegally obtained as you suggest may be the case, then I would expect charges to be filed against those responsible. I think I read that the FBI is looking into this.
#35 | POSTED BY FOREIGNER

Ah okay, wasn't aware of who actually filed the warrant. So that's definitely important to consider, should it be some other LEO that filed it.

Yes, last I heard FBI is looking specifically into the warrant filing.

#36 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-24 08:06 PM | Reply

IOW, I mistakenly assumed one of the officers involved in the raid would have been responsible for the warrant.

Logical impass on my part.

#37 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-24 08:08 PM | Reply

I suppose there's a good argument to make, potentially related to MODER8's most recent thread, that officers filing warrants should also be involved with the following execution of said warrant. At least as it relates to these drug raids. I mean let's face it, an officer was injured (potentially fatally) because another officer filed an erroneous, falsified warrant application.

I've been a big proponent of CJS reform not just because of institutional racism or protecting the public, but also to protect law enforcement.

A significant portion of my support for body cameras on police is to protect the police from false allegations.

Is it ironic here that there's no body camera footage for Taylor's raid?

#38 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2020-09-24 08:14 PM | Reply

Nothing sums up the legal system better than Taylors admitted murderers going uncharged, the day before Robert Kraft goes uncharged despite getting busted in a massage parlor full of trafficked humans. His expensive lawyers got the whole thing thrown out.

#39 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2020-09-24 09:14 PM | Reply

"We do believe it was a coverup from go. They always intended to sweep this under the rug as if Breonna Taylor's life didn't matter," Crump told CNN's Anderson Cooper Thursday.

Crump said the three-page police report that said there were no signs of forced entry was filled with lies. He went on to say that "they had the audacity to say there were no injuries, yet Breonna was executed there in the hallway of her apartment."

www.cnn.com

#40 | Posted by FedUpWithPols at 2020-09-25 06:58 AM | Reply

There goes a good discussion with nonsense from speak and fed

#41 | Posted by kwrx25 at 2020-09-25 10:15 AM | Reply

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