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Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, January 26, 2021

Trump's incitement of the Jan. 6 riot, which is now the subject of an impeachment trial, was just one part of his scheme to subvert democracy.

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FTA:

[T]he conspiracy started many months before, when Trump convinced his followers that only fraud could explain any election that didn't result in his victory. As it became clear that he had lost, and not even that narrowly, Trump used that lie to propel a previously unthinkable attack on democracy. With the help of close aides, faraway operatives and admirers who needed to look no further than the President's Twitter feed to understand what he wanted them to do, Trump tested every vulnerability in the democratic process--every weak point in the electoral system where, perhaps, someone could be convinced or bullied to ignore the will of the people.

Trump's cadres, often at his direct instruction, brought forth frivolous lawsuits, harassed election workers, and twisted the arms of state officials behind the scenes.

As the window for undoing Biden's victory closed ever more tightly, Trump's claims about election fraud became more convoluted, his boasts of how he actually won more sweeping, and his plotting more desperate. In the end, he was reduced to riling up a deranged mob to set upon the Capitol.

Always present, however, was the false insistence--often deployed as a racist appeal--that the election, supposedly plagued by fraud, had been "rigged" against the President.


#1 | Posted by Gal_Tuesday at 2021-01-26 07:42 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

This article, which traces Trump's attempts to steal the election, could be used as an outline for the impeachment proceedings: For example, what happened the day after the election in Detroit:

As the President tweeted false accusations of ballots being "found" for Democrats, an influx of fresh poll challengers--many of them Republican or affiliated with a conservative "election integrity" group--arrived at the TCF Center.

The number of people inside the hall swelled until the large counting room, originally designed to host the North American International Auto Show, was at capacity. Several of the new arrivals congregated in the lobby outside of the hall, alongside experienced poll watchers of both parties who had left for lunch. At this point, the building's management was refusing to let anyone else inside.

The newcomers who had made it onto thee counting floor became increasingly aggressive, haranguing ballot counters. A handful of people in the room started a chant: "Stop. The. Count." It failed to catch on at first, but it quickly spread to the several dozen wannabe observers stuck in the lobby looking in. Soon, the lobby crowd--mostly white--was banging on the windows to punctuate the chants as election workers--mostly Black--looked on from inside the hall, mere feet away.

"I think they all felt that this is definitely something different, something aggressive," Thomas said of his colleagues.

The night before, in nationally televised remarks from the White House, Trump claimed he had won the election, and any results still coming in showing otherwise were "major fraud" to steal his victory from him. Trump demanded that "voting"--i.e. the continued counting of mail-in ballots--be "stopped."

Trump continued the claims through Wednesday morning, and in a tweet singled out Michigan in particular. Moments later, his campaign announced a lawsuit seeking to stop the state's count.

But the Trump supporters gathered at the TCF Center weren't going to wait for the judicial system. They would take matters into their own hands.

As the "stop the count" chant continued, building management placed cardboard over some of the windows, quickly attracting scorn from GOP officials on social media. Police eventually arrived, lining up between the crowd and the windows. It took several more hours before the Republican activists fully dissipated.

"It unnerved a lot of people, particularly in the room," Thomas recalled.


#2 | Posted by Gal_Tuesday at 2021-01-26 08:04 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

I still wonder about the comment attributed to Mr Giuliani that said, ~ ... we need the riot to delay the certification for a day...~

I still wonder why the goal seemed to be to delay it for a day? Could the delay have to do with the installation of a new Acting Attorney General to start messing with the states' results?

#3 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-01-26 11:41 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

I still wonder why the goal seemed to be to delay it for a day?
#3 | POSTED BY LAMPLIGHTER

I was under the impression that Congress was required to certify the results within a certain timeframe. And that if they were unable to certify the results within that timeframe that it would then go to the House to pick the President (with the one vote per Congressional delegation choosing the President).

#4 | Posted by gtbritishskull at 2021-01-26 02:51 PM | Reply

@#4 ... I was under the impression that Congress was required to certify the results within a certain timeframe. ...

Really? I didn't know that.

But a leeway in the time frame of only one day sounds a bit on the low side, no?

#5 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-01-26 02:56 PM | Reply

@#4 ... I was under the impression that Congress was required to certify the results within a certain timeframe. ...

Aside from the 12th Amendment seemingly saying it needs to be done by Jan 20, I cannot find anything that presents the timeline you noted, let alone such a short timeline.

Have a link?

thx.

#6 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-01-26 03:49 PM | Reply

"I was under the impression that Congress was required to certify the results within a certain timeframe. And that if they were unable to certify the results within that timeframe that it would then go to the House to pick the President (with the one vote per Congressional delegation choosing the President).

#4 | POSTED BY GTBRITISHSKULL

I recall the time frame was 11 days.

#7 | Posted by Twinpac at 2021-01-26 04:26 PM | Reply

@#7

I found this...

...Such joint meeting shall not be dissolved until the
count of electoral votes shall be completed and the result
declared; and no recess shall be taken unless a question shall
have arisen in regard to counting any such votes, or other-
wise under this subchapter, in which case it shall be compe-
tent for either House, acting separately, in the manner here-
inbefore provided, to direct a recess of such House not be-
yond the next calendar day, Sunday excepted, at the hour of
10 o'clock in the forenoon. But if the counting of the elec-
toral votes and the declaration of the result shall not have
been completed before the fifth calendar day next after such
first meeting of the two Houses, no further or other recess
shall be taken by either House....

Page 13 of this document
The 2020 Presidential Election/Provisions of the Constitution and U.S. Code (PDF)
www.archives.gov

(page 13 as noted on the page numbering at the bottom of each page, however, the 15th page of the PDF)

#8 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-01-26 04:55 PM | Reply

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