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Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Wednesday, April 07, 2021

U.S. Dept. of Energy's Fermilab: The long-awaited first results from the Muon g-2 experiment at the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory show fundamental particles called muons behaving in a way that is not predicted by scientists' best theory, the Standard Model of particle physics. This landmark result, made with unprecedented precision, confirms a discrepancy that has been gnawing at researchers for decades.

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"Today is an extraordinary day, long awaited not only by us but by the whole international physics community," said Graziano Venanzoni, co-spokesperson of the Muon g-2 experiment and physicist at the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics. "A large amount of credit goes to our young researchers who, with their talent, ideas and enthusiasm, have allowed us to achieve this incredible result."

"This quantity we measure reflects the interactions of the muon with everything else in the universe. But when the theorists calculate the same quantity, using all of the known forces and particles in the Standard Model, we don't get the same answer," said Renee Fatemi, a physicist at the University of Kentucky and the simulations manager for the Muon g-2 experiment. "This is strong evidence that the muon is sensitive to something that is not in our best theory."

Here's a more generic version of the story from AP.

apnews.com

"This is not a fudge factor. This is something wrong," Kaplan said. That something could be explained by a new particle or force."

#1 | Posted by Corky at 2021-04-07 06:09 PM | Reply

The Nuntium particle. Not the first time. Reading....

#2 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2021-04-07 08:39 PM | Reply

Wait. This is actually a strong indicator of frame dragging. Reading....

#3 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2021-04-07 08:42 PM | Reply

Muons consistently show symmetry-breaking characteristics, including breaking time-symmetry. Not a big surprise.

#4 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2021-04-07 08:54 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

Actual physicists say, "Extraordinary!", while RatBoy in nonplussed.

Figures. What do those guys know, anyway?

#5 | Posted by Corky at 2021-04-07 09:04 PM | Reply

I like pop tarts.

#6 | Posted by Karabekian at 2021-04-07 09:22 PM | Reply

Zatoichi was involved in this. Muons are one of the few leptons whose half life is 2.2^-6 seconds. Which is rather a long time for subatomic leptonic particles. Of course the electron, the quintessential lepton's life is much, much longer, and can be harnessed using simple electromagnetism to carry electromagnetic fields long distances. It's not necessarily the electrons pulsing through your homes that provide the energy, but the magnetism they put off by moving in an alternating current. The transformer stepping down the 14.4 kV to 220 to your house actually never touches your electric lines. The 14.4 kV is wound around a large magnet within the transformer, while the other side of the square electromagnetic device is wound with fewer windings to step down the voltage to your home. The wires between the 14.4 kV distribution lines never touch your home lines. It's all done by electromagnetism. So, what you're really paying for in your electric bill is the ability to tap into this electromagnetic magnet.

#7 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 09:53 PM | Reply

I've always kept an eye out for another stable subatomic particle that could be harness for useful energy and work, but the one's that have been discovered so far are much too unstable to use.

I figure in the next 200 years, someone will find one useful enough for this purpose. Perhaps with light (pure electromagnetic energy) instead of copper or aluminium wire.

#8 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 09:57 PM | Reply

...as a conduit.

#9 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 09:58 PM | Reply

#8 When you say another, what's the first one?

#10 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-04-07 10:02 PM | Reply

I figure in the next 200 years, someone will find one useful enough for this purpose. Perhaps with light (pure electromagnetic energy) instead of copper or aluminium wire.
#8 | POSTED BY MADSCIENTIST

It might take humans 200 years to come up with it, but the aliens will give us the knowledge far sooner than that.

Pffft

LOL

#11 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2021-04-07 10:05 PM | Reply

I truly miss ZAT.

#12 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2021-04-07 10:07 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#8 When you say another, what's the first one?

The electron.

#13 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 10:13 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Electron neutrinos and electron antineutrinos put off by the Sun are another possibility. But they don't seem to be affected by electromagnetism and have essentially no mass and pass through everything. People, the planets, space, unimpeded. The static on your television.

If a physicist discovered a way to control them, it'd be a breakthrough of the ages. Like the harnessing of the electron by Michael Faraday, JJ Thomson, and Allesandro Volta.

#14 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 10:20 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Incidentally, Zatoichi was working with a group of scientists from the University of Texas to determine rock structures beneath the earth with more precision than current methods. They'd bombard sections of earth with muons and calculate the rate of half-life destruction into an electron, an electron antineutrino, and an muon antineutrino. The above scientific notation of the half-life of a muon is 2.2 seconds.

The result was a more precise three-dimensional view of the strata beneath the surface being examined.

#15 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 10:26 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"That something could be explained by a new particle or force."

Which new particle or force some billionaire somewhere is figuring out how to monetize.

#16 | Posted by Corky at 2021-04-07 10:30 PM | Reply

The closest possible aliens would be from Proxima and Alpha Centauri, Sirius, Bernard's Star, Wolf 359, and Procyon. There are several brown stars in this range, but don't produce the life-giving electromagnetic energy needed for life to thrive. And still, if beings from these closest stars could generate velocities approaching half the speed of light, it'd still take dozens of years for them to contact us.

#17 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 10:33 PM | Reply

#15 They also did that on the Pyramids, right? First when neutrinos were discovered, and recently they discovered a new room inside.

#18 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-04-07 10:37 PM | Reply

And if they were sophisticated enough to harness the electron for use as a carrier wave for communication, we would've discovered it by now. The Earth has been sending out carrier wave information for 120 years now and we haven't heard a peep back from anything within 120 light years as a response.

#19 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 10:39 PM | Reply

"There are several brown stars in this range, but don't produce the life-giving electromagnetic energy needed for life to thrive."

You don't think thermal vents in the ocean are enough?

Our data suggests you're right, but ours is an uncontrolled experiment.

#20 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-04-07 10:39 PM | Reply

For instance, the Voyager and Pioneer spacecraft's amplitude is so low it's measured in femto-, atta-, and picowatts...much smaller than a nanowatt. We should be able to distinguish intelligent radiocommunications by now.

#21 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 10:45 PM | Reply

#18 Yes, I do remember them testing the pyramids. That was one use for them.

#22 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 10:46 PM | Reply

So long as we get Interstellar teleportation I'm fine with having to rewrite the laws of physics as we know them.

#23 | Posted by Tor at 2021-04-07 10:47 PM | Reply

#20 possibly, but even though the life living on thermal vents using sulfur as an oxidation agent produced by the heat of the earth must coexist parasitically with animals that are dependent on our yellow sun?

#24 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 10:50 PM | Reply

Data suggest.

That is a hard habit to break.

#25 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-04-07 10:51 PM | Reply

Oh? How loud is our signal, from where Voyager sits?

#26 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-04-07 10:53 PM | Reply

Tor, the laws of Newtonian physics and Quantum physics apply everywhere equally in the cosmos.

As observed so far.

Aeronautical PhDs only need to calculate pi on the order of precision as 3.14i5926535 for precise physical celestial computations for all spacecraft going to the Moon or Mars and beyond.

#27 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 10:57 PM | Reply

Voyager I, the deepest space probe, transmits on Deep Space Network Channel 18, using a frequency of either 2.3 GHz or 8.4 GHz, from a 470 Watt internal radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). While transmission from earth are transmitted by Deep Space Networks on Earth at 2.1 GHz. The data received from Voyager I is on the order of femto- and attaWatts.

References:

1. Wall, Mike (December 1, 2017). "Voyager 1 Just Fired Up its Backup Thrusters for the 1st Time in 37 Years". Space.com. Retrieved December 3, 2017.

2. "High Gain Antenna". JPL. Retrieved August 18, 2013.

3. Furlong, Richard R.; Wahlquist, Earl J. (1999). "U.S. space missions using radioisotope power systems" (PDF). Nuclear News. 42 (4): 26"34.

#28 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 11:12 PM | Reply

But we know exactly where to look for that signal.

We put it there.

#29 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-04-07 11:14 PM | Reply

Which new particle or force some billionaire somewhere is figuring out how to monetize.
#16 | POSTED BY CORKY

Antigravity.

#30 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2021-04-07 11:14 PM | Reply

By the way, so is your GHz-range LTE 4G cellphone. It interdicts data at as little as picowatts, femtowatts, and even attowatts.

#31 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 11:15 PM | Reply

Very interesting topic and posts. Science isn't my field, but I really enjoy (reading) discussions about space and science and learning new things. Thanks!

#32 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY at 2021-04-07 11:17 PM | Reply

the signal strength falls off at a rate of 1 over r squared. This is universal. It's also amazing if you think about stars that are light years away from us and a signal from something made by humans that's billions of miles away. I love this Universe.

#33 | Posted by YAV at 2021-04-07 11:20 PM | Reply

(r is just distance. I should have generalized it by using a 'd' instead of the value from the equation where "r" is radius.)

#34 | Posted by YAV at 2021-04-07 11:22 PM | Reply

Yav, I am on your wavelength. I was simply trying to be Socratic, probably because that's how I am, and I did my undergrad in physics.

#35 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-04-07 11:29 PM | Reply

I saw this title and immediately thought of Zatoichi because of the muons. He enjoyed that project immensely it seemed.

#36 | Posted by grumpy_too at 2021-04-07 11:37 PM | Reply

I see what you're saying mad scientist and yet the Articles title remains...

#37 | Posted by Tor at 2021-04-07 11:48 PM | Reply

Well, you did a good job of it, Snoofy. You reached the limits of my knowledge to the point I had to look up references. Thank you for not being too hard on me.

#38 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-07 11:55 PM | Reply

Glad we have some actual scientists here. I wondered if there is any interaction between muons and dark matter and found these articles...

www.google.com

... not that neutrinos as "hot dark matter" answered my question, lol.

#39 | Posted by Corky at 2021-04-08 12:33 AM | Reply

What, no discussion on the time asymmetry in kaon vs. anti-kaon decay? That's a serious issue. That's an asymmetry in the universe, and the only one observable on a sub-atomic scale.

#40 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2021-04-08 12:44 AM | Reply

"Bury my guns at Tektite II."

#41 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-04-08 12:53 AM | Reply

#40

You unstable meson, you.

#42 | Posted by Corky at 2021-04-08 12:56 AM | Reply

'On the other tentacle' was pretty funny though.

#43 | Posted by Corky at 2021-04-08 12:58 AM | Reply

Heliumrat, K mesons are not my forte on the standard model. It looks like they degrade rather quickly, on the order of 10^-8 seconds to 10^-11 seconds, depending on their Eigenstates when produced from nuclear mesons such as within the Sun.

#44 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-08 01:07 AM | Reply

They are non Hadronic particles composed in various ways from up, down, strange, charm, top, and bottom quarks. NB. Quarks have never been observed directly, but postulated to exist as the simples form of matter that all other Hadronic particles occur.

#45 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-08 01:12 AM | Reply

So quarks are the fudge factor?

#46 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-04-08 01:30 AM | Reply

I'm unaware of any equations dealing with quarks with a fugacity coefficient appropriated to the front of them.

#47 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-08 01:41 AM | Reply

In chemical thermodynamics, fugacity factors are used to effectively estimate partial pressures on an ideal gas. However, the system must retain the same temperature and Gibbs Free Energy.

The equation can be realized by: limP-->0 of fsubi/Psubi = 0

Where P = pressure
fsubi = the fugacity factor of i
Psubi = the partial pressure of i

Incidentally, the partial pressures follow Dalton's law of partial pressures in which the total sum of the pressures of a liquid or gas equals the respective partial pressures of all gasses or fluids exert in a system against its surroundings.

or

P(total) = The capital letter Sigma of i=1 to n of p1+p2+p3+p(n)

#48 | Posted by madscientist at 2021-04-08 01:53 AM | Reply

Thanks to this thread I looked up some other articles about the topic, dumbed down for non-scientists like myself.

While I can understand the subject to some degree when it's simplified into layman's terms, my understanding of this topic is akin to how someone who isn't an orchestrating/digital recording/ producer/composer/musician like myself wouldn't be familiar with terms like 'sordino strings' or 'word clock jitter' others may not have a grasp on :-)

#49 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY at 2021-04-08 04:12 PM | Reply

word clock jitter

Great band. Saw them in '75.

#50 | Posted by REDIAL at 2021-04-08 04:30 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

Zatoichi was involved in this.
If I remember right ,he used to shoot them from his kitchen window with his 357 Ruger.

#51 | Posted by northguy3 at 2021-04-08 05:40 PM | Reply

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