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Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Major League Baseball is playing around with the idea of changing the distance from home plate to the pitchers mound for the first time since 1893. The Atlantic League minor league will test a pitching rubber 61 feet and 6 inches from home -- an extra foot beyond the norm. "I love baseball, but the rules aren't written on stone tablets," said Chicago Cubs exec Jed Hoyer.

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What I see in this is that the pitchers were too in control of the flow of the game, i.e., when pitchers are in controlof th flow of the game is boring.

Moving the mound back a foot gives the batters a bit more of an advantage.

Like the Sosa era, but without the steoids...

#1 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-04-14 06:33 PM | Reply

@#1

Woof, major typos...

Lemme try again...

What I see in this is that the pitchers were too in control of the flow of the game, i.e., when pitchers are in control of the flow of the game, the game is boring.

Moving the mound back a foot gives the batters a bit more of an advantage.

Like the Sosa era, but without the steroids...

(I have to be more careful when I switch keyboards... :) )

#2 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-04-14 07:35 PM | Reply

Lowering the height of the mound can also help

#3 | Posted by NerfHerder at 2021-04-14 09:13 PM | Reply

@#3 ... Lowering the height of the mound can also help ...

I've seen that, but I've never been able to understand why.

Just one of the baseball curiosities I struggle with.

Though, I guess if the mound were ten feet lower than home plate, that may put the pitcher at a disadvantage...

{shrug}

There's so much I just don't understand about sports.



#4 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-04-14 09:30 PM | Reply

Since both teams play by the same rules, it doesn't matter. Statistically it will increase the likelihood of extra innings games.

#5 | Posted by jakester at 2021-04-14 09:34 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

@#5 ... Since both teams play by the same rules, it doesn't matter. Statistically it will increase the likelihood of extra innings games. ...

Not sure to what you refer.

What is the "it" in your comment?

thx.

#6 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-04-14 10:12 PM | Reply

#4 Lamp.
Pitchers mound is nearly one foot higher than home plate.
Pitchers effectively throw downhill.
Lowering the mound would decrease pitchers height advantage speed, giving batters better chance at hitting the ball, allegedly making the game more exciting.
I say play seven inning games in a one hundred game season.
With ten dollar seats, three dollar dogs, and five dollar beers.

#7 | Posted by Docman at 2021-04-15 07:43 AM | Reply

Since both teams play by the same rules, it doesn't matter. Statistically it will increase the likelihood of extra innings games.

#5 | POSTED BY JAKESTER

Not true. If a team has focused their development and rosters more heavily on pitching then they theoretically would not gain the same advantage as clubs that focus more on offense.

How do you figure it would contribute to more extra innings?

#8 | Posted by johnny_hotsauce at 2021-04-15 12:07 PM | Reply

#8 0-0 ties will be a bit more likely.

"Not true. If a team has focused their development and rosters more heavily on pitching then they theoretically would not gain the same advantage as clubs that focus more on offense."

That would be true regardless where the pitcher's mound is.

#9 | Posted by jakester at 2021-04-15 12:21 PM | Reply

Fry:
I don't get this. Is Blernsball exactly the same as baseball?

Farnsworth:
Baseball? God forbid.

Leela:
Face it, Fry, baseball was as boring as mom and apple pie.

Fry:
It wasn't bori- (cuts himself off) so they finally jazzed it up.

-Futurama, "Fear of the Bot Planet"

#10 | Posted by Sycophant at 2021-04-15 12:21 PM | Reply

Now, get it down to 2 or 3 ball walks. Stop it from being a stupid pitching game, which is boring to watch.

#11 | Posted by Sycophant at 2021-04-15 12:24 PM | Reply

Yeah, Sandy Koufax, Bob Gibson, Pedro Martinez....what snooze-fests.

Stick to "Me big, me hit" sports, bro.

#12 | Posted by LegallyYourDead at 2021-04-15 02:25 PM | Reply

Wait! There's more.....

"The Atlantic League will also implement a "double-hook" rule, in which a team will lose its designated hitter when it removes its starting pitcher. That rule will be in effect the entire season, which starts May 27. The goal is to see starters pitch longer into games, creating more value for them and increasing late-game strategy."

Interesting.

It's so common for major league teams to have many pitchers who can throw 97+ MPH. That used to be rare....not any longer.

I'm excited to how this impacts the game.

#13 | Posted by eberly at 2021-04-15 02:34 PM | Reply

I'm excited to see how this impacts the game.

#14 | Posted by eberly at 2021-04-15 03:49 PM | Reply

#14 Statistics are more meaningful in baseball than any other sport in my opinion. So I agree that it will be interesting to see how they change with the new mound rule. It'll probably take a couple of seasons to get an accurate delta standard deviation. I'm not sure I like the new rule, but I agree that it will be interesting to see how it impacts the game statistics wise.

#15 | Posted by jakester at 2021-04-15 04:55 PM | Reply

How many pitchers were throwing over 90mph in 1893 because now it's like 95%.
I think if they want to help the game just speed it up. No endless stepping off mound or stepping out of batter box. Just play like they used to IMO

#16 | Posted by 503jc69 at 2021-04-15 05:22 PM | Reply

Smelt Night.

#17 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-04-15 06:46 PM | Reply

503JC69 asked, "How many pitchers were throwing over 90mph in 1893"

Who knows? Radar speed detection was not available then. Sure folks could say, "Wow! That was a fast pitch!", but how could they accurately determine the speed of the ball?

#18 | Posted by jakester at 2021-04-15 06:49 PM | Reply

#18 They could count video frames.

#19 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-04-15 06:57 PM | Reply

In 1908, one pitcher threw for 464 innings
1870's guys were throwing 650+ innings. Nowadays it's rare that a pitcher gets 300 innings.
My guess is based on those stats.

#20 | Posted by 503jc69 at 2021-04-15 07:51 PM | Reply

16

If you google pitchers like Walter Johnson and Bob Feller who pitched long before radar....they use video technology to determine how fast they threw.

Amazingly enough, they believe those guys threw as fast as many today do.....but that was such a rarity back then.

Just in the past 25 years, there are so many more pitchers who can throw 97 MPH.

Also...google hitters like A-Rod or Jeter in interviews when asked the difference between 99 MPH and 90 MPH fastballs. The best hitters in the world will tell you it's a massive difference.

and the heights of pitchers matters so much today as well when they are prospecting and developing. A taller pitcher has an advantage because his release point is closer to the plate than a shorter pitcher. That small difference is actually why you don't see shorter pitchers who can throw just as fast as taller pitchers.

#21 | Posted by eberly at 2021-04-15 10:49 PM | Reply

I don't doubt there where a few who could hit the mid 90's... it just wasn't very common like now.

And the difference between pitchers who throw 90 or those who throw 99 is real. Even on "The Show", the video game, you can feel the difference and it changes all your timing.

#22 | Posted by 503jc69 at 2021-04-15 11:00 PM | Reply

Won't changing the rules that drastically make the record books obsolete? Personally, baseball puts me to sleep. I'd be hard pressed to name one current player.

#23 | Posted by Dutch46 at 2021-04-16 06:07 PM | Reply

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