Advertisement

Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Saturday, June 05, 2021

Benjy Sarlin and Sahil Kapur: When President Barack Obama abandoned a public insurance option to win moderate support for the Affordable Care Act in 2009, progressives were enraged. A decade later, Joe Biden campaigned on making the public option a reality, but so far, he's done little to get Congress to enact one.

More

Comments

Admin's note: Participants in this discussion must follow the site's moderation policy. Profanity will be filtered. Abusive conduct is not allowed.

ROtten little bastards. That's what happens when you get a corporatist sell out Democrat. Then You people wonder why I didn't vote for him. And Bernie don't get me started about him. The rotten bastards.

#1 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2021-06-05 11:24 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Biden should draft everyone into the Military on stand by with zero pay, but with tricare. Done.

#2 | Posted by bored at 2021-06-05 11:32 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Biden can't enact a public health option. Its math. He needs at least 50 senate votes and he doesn't have them. Manchin is enabling the GOP to block any dem agenda item.

I have no idea why you blame Biden for the GOP's actions.

#3 | Posted by bored at 2021-06-05 11:35 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

#1

No, we all know why you wouldn't vote for him, you are a purity pony.

You win all kinds of nice symbolic prizes and share them with the rest of us who want real prizes.

#4 | Posted by bocaink at 2021-06-05 01:44 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

I had to use my health insurance yesterday. It took a call to customer service just to get the number for the nurse advice line, because my insurance is contracted out to a third party. My employer is in Texas, their chosen provider is in Utah, and I am in California, so the provider contracts me out to a California provider. And when I go to my California provider's health care website, there's no way for me to pick a PCP because of my third party status.

I spent nearly as much time trying to figure out how to use my health insurance, as I did actually getting health care.

Our system is fundamentally broken by design. It's a middleman's wet dream.

#5 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-06-05 01:52 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

A public option that was in a new bill in Colorado just magically disappeared after significant pressure from the private sector. I fear that we will never get affordable healthcare for everyone in the U.S. There are just too many hands in the cookies jar.

Colorado Democrats drop public health insurance option to pursue state-regulated plan instead after industry pushback

#6 | Posted by Whatsleft at 2021-06-05 03:58 PM | Reply

Biden and Obama on 31 million Americans having Obamacare.
twitter.com

#7 | Posted by bored at 2021-06-05 04:02 PM | Reply

What prevents healthcare-for-all?

The stock market. That's what.

Does anybody really believe trump was on hydroxychloroquine - no they know he had a vested interest in the manufacturer.

#8 | Posted by LostAngeles at 2021-06-05 07:18 PM | Reply

" What prevents healthcare-for-all? The stock market. That's what.

Nah. It's the fact about 25% of workers would have to accept a lesser plan, and five to ten major groups will coalesce against HC4A including high-paying industries like health and pharma.

And that's before half the country hates the plan because of which party suggested it.

#9 | Posted by Danforth at 2021-06-05 08:06 PM | Reply

"Our system is fundamentally broken by design."

You're absolutely right.

Can you name any other industry which doesn't list prices, and won't tell you until after you've purchased?

Or a business where the top employees take an oath to provide as few potential customers as possible to their bosses?!?

#10 | Posted by Danforth at 2021-06-06 12:39 AM | Reply

Damn bloodsuckers, people's lives are at stake.

Corporations are a curse on American life. Health care could be affordable for everyone if this country wasn't owned by the rich and their proxies.

It will take an actual revolution to see real change. The corporate interests have stolen our democracy. Our government is for sale and both parties and the judicial system have been corrupted.

Eventually the third estate will end this state of affairs, the corporate toads will be ousted or killed.

Or maybe Americans are too soft and divided, and an open oligarchy will claim ownership unopposed, and our system of governance will die with a whimper, not a bang.

#11 | Posted by Effeteposer at 2021-06-06 01:30 AM | Reply

I have no idea why you blame Biden for the GOP's actions.

#3 | POSTED BY BORED

Exactly.

#12 | Posted by donnerboy at 2021-06-06 09:28 AM | Reply

And speaking of fizzling.... What ever happened to that tremendous and cheap health care plan from Trumpy and his crew?

You know the one...

"We're going to have insurance for everybody," Trump said in an interview with The Washington Post. "There was a philosophy in some circles that if you can't pay for it, you don't get it. That's not going to happen with us."

"I was the first & only potential GOP candidate to state there will be no cuts to Social Security, Medicare & Medicaid" " before arguing that GOP also-ran Mike Huckabee was copying him.

That's another promise that wasn't born out by the CBO, which found the House Obamacare repeal measure would cut Medicaid by $880 billion.

"I am going to take care of everybody ... Everybody's going to be taken care of much better than they're taken care of now." More recently, Trump has promised that repeal will end with "a beautiful picture."

All lies of course. Stupid lies even.

#13 | Posted by donnerboy at 2021-06-06 09:37 AM | Reply

Medicare has a 2% overhead. Private insurance is 20-30% or more. Americans pay 5x more for the same drugs and medical devices (sometimes a lot more - $50 worth of insulin is $1000 - a month supply - here in the states. Diabetic-I's are dying).

Medicare for all with a law saying you can't charge more for drugs and devices than you charge overseas. It would be cheaper and your records don't get lost every time you switch doctors.

#14 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2021-06-06 01:51 PM | Reply

Because a DINO is Potus.

#15 | Posted by fresno500 at 2021-06-06 01:55 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"It's the fact about 25% of workers would have to accept a lesser plan"

They could, and should, be given the option to purchase a supplemental insurance plan. Much like the Medicare supplemental insurance plans people can buy right now.

#16 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-06-06 02:43 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#16 No, you work for China. You are why nobody takes the New Left seriously. We want medicare for all without the gigantic price gouge, so prices drop way down and everybody gets care.

You want to destroy America comrade. That's why you say the things you do.

#17 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2021-06-06 04:21 PM | Reply

This classic Bloom County comic from my childhood will explain why I will always love real liberals: 1.-------------

#18 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2021-06-06 04:25 PM | Reply

Dems have the house. Dems have the Senate but the VP casts the tie vote. Get rid of the filibuster, and then put it back in place after you are done.

#19 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2021-06-06 05:57 PM | Reply

"They could, and should, be given the option to purchase a supplemental insurance plan."

They're already paying more, to get the better plan they already have.

And don't look closely...but every concept of how its paid for, STARTS with your employer paying the same, even for lesser coverage.

#20 | Posted by Danforth at 2021-06-06 08:15 PM | Reply

I spent nearly as much time trying to figure out how to use my health insurance, as I did actually getting health care."

That's almost as bad as my experiences.

Let me tell you about how the state provides me with healthcare.

Let's say you have a persistent fever and cough. Since those are symptoms of COVID, they will tell you not to come in at all, and to stay home.

Let's say you you have persisten abdominal pains. Upon calling your provider, the phone will be answered by office personnel, who will pass your request on to a nurse, who will typically call you back within several hours. They will take your name and info. They then will pass that info on to another healthcare provider, who has up to two business days to call you back. Once they call you back, they determine whether or not the visit will be in person, or handled as a phone consult. If it is in person, the appointment is generally scheduled within two weeks. If at the appointment the doctor determines the need for any sort of MRI or CT scan, that's an additional month. For something like an endoscopy or colonoscopy, an additional two months.

Or, you can just go to the ER and knock it all out over the course of an evening.

#21 | Posted by madbomber at 2021-06-07 07:48 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

#11

What do you mean "healthcare should be affordable?" How? Pay doctors less? Build less hospitals? Buy less medical equipment? Less investment in medical research?

Primative healthcare probably is affordable.

#22 | Posted by madbomber at 2021-06-07 07:51 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

"Eventually the third estate will end this state of affairs, the corporate toads will be ousted or killed."

And then what?

The proletariat step in and fill those roles?

Id that were a possibility, it would be happening now. I have zero interest paying money to a CEO that could be realized as dividends...but they make me more than they cost me, so they're worth it.

I think you were born about a century too late, my Bolshevik friend.

#23 | Posted by madbomber at 2021-06-07 07:53 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

"Medicare has a 2% overhead. Private insurance is 20-30% or more."

The problem with government plans like Medicare and Tricare is that they save money by paying less for care. So a lot of providers don't accept those plans, or accept them conditionally. Why take a patient that will pay less when you have ones that pay more.

"Medicare for all with a law saying you can't charge more for drugs and devices than you charge overseas."

That's OK, but it would likely eliminate indigent drug programs that provide free or steeply discounted drugs to developing countries.

#24 | Posted by madbomber at 2021-06-07 07:57 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

"What do you mean "healthcare should be affordable?" How? Pay doctors less? Build less hospitals? Buy less medical equipment? Less investment in medical research?"

Other nations seem to be able to accomplish that goal because they don't have rich insurance companies sucking up 20-30% of every healthcare dollar spent. MB is just a shill for insurance industry and other unregulated capitalist industries which are sucking the wealth from the middle class to benefit the 1%. I believe he actually thinks they will reward him for doing so. Perhaps they will but, personally, no matter how much they promised me, I could never shill for them. He thinks he can but I predict his conscience will catch up to him one day and I pity him on that day.

#25 | Posted by danni at 2021-06-07 08:16 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Here is an interesting and informative article on private supplemental healthcare in the UK.

"thehealthcareblog.com"

For example, one GP told me that he tries hard not to obtain specialty consultations unless absolutely necessary, as a matter of pride and " to a degree " economics (each primary care network has a global budget that covers only so many specialty consultations). But there is a subtler disincentive for GPs to obtain consults: specialists, salaried and often overwhelmingly busy, can be nasty. "I'll send an NHS patient to an orthopedic surgeon," this GP told me, "and I'll get back a letter from the consultant. What it says is civil enough. But between the lines, its message is: How could you be so stupid that you couldn't manage this patient yourself?'"

Anyone who has ever seen a harried cardiology fellow attack an intern for a "lame consult" may not be surprised by this behavior from an overworked consultant who lacks any economic incentive to see the next patient. But things are different when the patient has private insurance. Suddenly, the threshold for consultation is much lower, the consults aren't scrutinized by anyone (since the payment comes from the insurer, not the NHS or the practice), and the consultant is tickled pink to see the patient and pocket the generous fee " and sings a very different tune to the referring doctor. "When I send a private patient to the very same orthopedic surgeon," the GP told me, chuckling, "I get a very different type of letter back. It might say, You were brilliant to send this patient to me. I so look forward to managing this patient with you.' Doesn't the surgeon realize I'm the same person?"

The conflicts play out within the specialists' practices themselves. One London neurologist told me that he might see a patient in consultation for a neurological disorder and offer a follow-up appointment in several months, assuming there is no urgent clinical need. "But if the patient has private insurance, she can see me tomorrow if she'd like."

The average specialist in the UK augments his or her income by about 50 percent through private practice, but there are wide variations. Specialists operating in the countryside, where few patients have private insurance, may have no opportunity to practice privately. On the other hand, some London specialists double or triple their salaries through private work. I asked several prominent specialists why they didn't just ditch the NHS and switch to full-time private practice. The answers varied, but usually included some version of "I take my obligation to participate in the NHS seriously" (this may sound a bit too idealistic for jaded Americans, but I found this credible in the UK, where belief in the NHS can be near-religious) and, more pragmatically, "It is my NHS practice that allows me to be prominent enough to attract patients to my private practice."

#26 | Posted by madbomber at 2021-06-07 08:18 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

"Why take a patient that will pay less when you have ones that pay more."

Possibly because healthcare providers shouldn't just be concerned about profits, you can't process that thought because you are owned by those who profit from healthcare.
You think the rest of us Americans can't learn about healthcare in other modern nations and realize our system is just a profit center for the 1% who own your ass. You will say anything they tell you to, pretend otherwise because, actually, I need a good laugh this morning.
Do you ever have a moment of clarity when you realize you probably have relatives losing homes and healthcare because of the high priced system you support?

#27 | Posted by danni at 2021-06-07 08:21 AM | Reply

"One London neurologist told me that he might see a patient in consultation for a neurological disorder and offer a follow-up appointment in several months, assuming there is no urgent clinical need."

"Assuming there is not urgent clinical need."

What don't you understand about that sentence shill?

#28 | Posted by danni at 2021-06-07 08:22 AM | Reply

et's say you have a persistent fever and cough. Since those are symptoms of COVID, they will tell you not to come in at all, and to stay home.
Let's say you you have persisten abdominal pains. Upon calling your provider, the phone will be answered by office personnel, who will pass your request on to a nurse, who will typically call you back within several hours. They will take your name and info. They then will pass that info on to another healthcare provider, who has up to two business days to call you back. Once they call you back, they determine whether or not the visit will be in person, or handled as a phone consult. If it is in person, the appointment is generally scheduled within two weeks. If at the appointment the doctor determines the need for any sort of MRI or CT scan, that's an additional month. For something like an endoscopy or colonoscopy, an additional two months.
Or, you can just go to the ER and knock it all out over the course of an evening.

#21 | POSTED BY MADBOMBER AT 2021-06-07 07:48 AM |

That isn't how it works for me.

I call my primary and if he can't see me he has a PA see me within 24 hours. Usually the same day. If I need any CT or anything like that he calls the Hospital he is affiliated with and they get me in the same day. Usually by the time I get there they are waiting for me. Never any wait. It's probably like that because I live in a town of 10K people.

#29 | Posted by byrdman at 2021-06-07 08:30 AM | Reply

"Possibly because healthcare providers shouldn't just be concerned about profits, you can't process that thought because you are owned by those who profit from healthcare."

It has nothing to do with me. I feel that doctors and other healthcare providers should be able to see only the poorest patients if that's what they wanted to do. But rationally, most workers are going to go with the option that provides them with the most benefit for their work. And that's presented in the article on UK healthcare. If you have two patients who are going to need a hip replacement and only one can been, which are you going to choose? The one from which you receive the most benefit, or the one from which you receive less?

#30 | Posted by madbomber at 2021-06-07 08:10 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

"You think the rest of us Americans can't learn about healthcare in other modern nations and realize our system is just a profit center for the 1% who own your ass."

Us. And the UK. And most western nations. But not Canada. If you want quick and timely care in Canada, you'll need to find another country in which to receive it.

#31 | Posted by madbomber at 2021-06-07 08:12 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

#29

I live overseas in a military community that only uses military or government contractors working for the DoD. When I lived in the US it was very different. Any waits were basically a function of your choosing a more convenient time.

I think most of the trouble with getting seen has to do with COVID, and possibly the draconian rules imposed by the host nation as a result of COVID.

#32 | Posted by madbomber at 2021-06-07 08:17 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

If you want quick and timely care in Canada, you'll need to find another country in which to receive it.

That pretty much depends on what sort of "care" you are looking for. If I have a cardiac arrest or break a bone I'll get care in an hour. If I need my "Tennis Elbow" fixed, that might take a while.

#33 | Posted by REDIAL at 2021-06-07 08:32 PM | Reply

#31 Canada has waits for non-urgent and elective health care, but there are no waits for urgent care other than the triage time in the ER.

I don't think you will find many Canadians wanting to switch to the US system. There are a lot more Americans wanting the Canadian system, even though it is the second worst system in developed countries.

#34 | Posted by bored at 2021-06-07 08:46 PM | Reply

"I don't think you will find many Canadians wanting to switch to the US system."

Do you think there are many Canadians wanting to switch to a UK style system, or a German system, or a Dutch system, where patients would be permitted to purchase supplemental healthcare that would provide them with better service?

All of my colleagues who don't fall under US SOFA status have private German health insurance. They can even deduct it from the taxes, which of course are paid to the German government.

Germany offers a lot of deductions.

#35 | Posted by madbomber at 2021-06-08 09:03 AM | Reply

Comments are closed for this entry.

Home | Breaking News | Comments | User Blogs | Stats | Back Page | RSS Feed | RSS Spec | DMCA Compliance | Privacy | Copyright 2021 World Readable

Drudge Retort