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Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Thursday, June 10, 2021

Amid an intensifying drought, Lake Mead in Nevada, the nation's largest reservoir by volume, reached its lowest level since the 1930s late Wednesday.

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U.S. Drought Monitor (updated June 10, 2021)
droughtmonitor.unl.edu

#1 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-06-10 11:59 AM | Reply

Cue the sand worms.

#2 | Posted by LegallyYourDead at 2021-06-10 03:10 PM | Reply

150'+ below its normal level

mead.uslakes.info

#3 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY at 2021-06-10 03:53 PM | Reply

This is definitely not the time to be living in the west. Already businesses and people are leaving California. This 'megadrought' will encourage even more of each to abandon the west. Not good for a state in dire need of taxes in spite of having record high ones.

#4 | Posted by jakester at 2021-06-10 04:37 PM | Reply

I've been reading 'Collapse' by Jared Diamond.
Examines how civilizations collapse and vanish. Easter Islanders, Maya, some Native Americans in the Southwest.
Environmental catastrophe, whether from over farming, over population, poor planning, not realizing you prospered in an atypically wet period and now the drought-schitt is hitting the fan, is a basically what wiped out a lot of them.

#5 | Posted by schifferbrains at 2021-06-10 04:54 PM | Reply

#5 - that is an excellent book. I read it a few years ago after reading Diamond's 'Guns, Germs, and Steel'. It was also very good.

#6 | Posted by jakester at 2021-06-10 05:07 PM | Reply

#5 - exactly. Humans live to the extreme, on the edge of the environment's capability to support them. So all it takes is one little bump in the road to make it all come tumbling down. That is what is happening in California. Let this megadrought continue for a couple more years, then 'The Big One' happen in SoCal, and it's all over for them.

#7 | Posted by jakester at 2021-06-10 05:09 PM | Reply

"This is definitely not the time to be living in the west. Already businesses and people are leaving California."

Officially, California added 21,200 people from July 1, 2019, to July 1, 2020, increasing the state's population a paltry 0.05% to 39.78 million people " still by far the most of any state.

But the bigger news from Wednesday's new population estimate was that 135,600 more people left the state than moved here. It's only the 12th time since 1900 the state has had a net migration loss, and the third largest ever recorded.

But while it's fashionable to blame California's taxes and policies for its recent exodus, state officials say the more likely culprit is the pandemic and the migration patterns of the state's large community of international immigrants.
www.cnbc.com

#8 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-06-10 05:10 PM | Reply

Close the Casinos and outlaw watering more than 20 feet of lawn in both nevada and california.

#9 | Posted by Tor at 2021-06-10 06:10 PM | Reply

Close the Casinos

Nevada wouldn't survive.

#10 | Posted by ClownShack at 2021-06-10 06:11 PM | Reply

I should have specified the ones in Vegas.

Reno and other locations can stay open.

LV is simply not a place humans can naturally live year round.

#11 | Posted by Tor at 2021-06-10 06:20 PM | Reply

Las Vegas has been growing like a mofo. I know someone who just moved there.

#12 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-06-10 06:34 PM | Reply

@#12 ... Las Vegas has been growing like a mofo. ...

While I think that people can move wherever they want to move, I do gotta say that the population increase (explosion) of Las Vegas seems to be quite unsustainable.

But I look at the flood insurance plans that the government proffers to allow people to live in and I wonder...

What will the government do to allow the people of Las Vegas to continue to have green lawns and huge water fountains in the middle of a desert?

#13 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-06-10 07:26 PM | Reply

"Let this megadrought continue for a couple more years, then 'The Big One' happen in SoCal, and it's all over for them."

Coastal CA doesn't have a water problem. Doha and Dubai are cities in the desert, and both are at least as green as Vegas. The water being desalinated sea water.

#14 | Posted by madbomber at 2021-06-10 08:38 PM | Reply

#14 - desalinization costs a lot. and for the amount of water California requires would be prohibitively expensive. A lot of their needs can't be answered with desalinization, like the natural ones. Daha and Dubai's water needs are almost exclusively for people, not for nature.

#15 | Posted by jakester at 2021-06-10 08:45 PM | Reply

@#15 ... desalinization costs a lot...

The water-salt bonds are quite strong, and take some energy to break.

Osmosis works with less energy, but I've not yet seen it on a city-level of water needs.

#16 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-06-10 09:04 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

One of the largest desalinization plants on Earth is in Aruba. Provides most if not all the drinking water and electricity for the whole island. It's a pretty gross thing to see in operation.

#17 | Posted by REDIAL at 2021-06-10 09:14 PM | Reply

Desalinization requires power. It doesn't produce it.

#18 | Posted by jakester at 2021-06-10 09:18 PM | Reply

Desalinization requires power. It doesn't produce it.

The plant in Aruba does. It burns oil and produces both water and electricity.

#19 | Posted by REDIAL at 2021-06-10 09:28 PM | Reply

Salt water can produce electricity

#20 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2021-06-10 09:29 PM | Reply

#20 - No it cannot. It can be used as the electrolyte with two different metals to produce electricity. You cannot scoop a cup of water out of the ocean and get electricity out it, though.

#21 | Posted by jakester at 2021-06-10 10:33 PM | Reply

Dubai has some of the highest water consumption rates in the world, with average water consumption of 145 gallons of water per person. The high consumption levels are driven by rapid urbanization, the climate, and an increase in population. The primary source of freshwater in Dubai is desalinated seawater from the Arabian Gulf. It accounts for 89.9% of the city's water supply needs. The remainder of the water demand is mainly serviced by underground water. The residential sector accounts for the highest rates of water consumption (60.6%) and is followed by the commercial sector (24.9%) and the industrial sector, which consumes about 3.7%. The irrigation sector consumes wastewater and is not included in the compiled data above.

www.worldatlas.com

#22 | Posted by madbomber at 2021-06-10 10:42 PM | Reply

@#19 ... Desalinization requires power. It doesn't produce it.

The plant in Aruba does. It burns oil and produces both water and electricity. ...

OK, let's look at this...

There is a plant in Aruba that you say does two things:
1) produces water via desalinization
2) provides electricity

Am I correct so far?

You also say that the plant provides those two functions by burning oil.

Am I still correct?

Might it be possible that the plant in questions burns so much oil that it is able to provide the electricity needed for desalinization and also provide electricity for other uses?

Might it be that the desalinization process does not provide electricity but actually uses a portion of the electricity generated?

Energy Snapshot - Aruba (PDF)
www.nrel.gov

...This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Aruba, an autonomous member of the Aruba Kingdom of the Netherlands located off the coast of Venezuela....

I do not see desalinization mentioned in that document as a source of electricity in Aruba.

Please show htat document to be incorrect.

thx.

#23 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-06-10 10:53 PM | Reply

#19 - I understand your first post now. I thought you were implying that through some alchemy trickery, fresh water and power were produced. Sorry about that.

#24 | Posted by jakester at 2021-06-10 10:54 PM | Reply

@#22 ... Dubai has some of the highest water consumption rates in the world, ...

Dubai is also in the part of the world where there is an abundance of cheap oil.

So what's yer point?

You seem to be confirming the extreme energy consumption of desalinization plants.


#25 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-06-10 10:55 PM | Reply

@#20 ... Salt water can produce electricity ...

So can a potato.

But that is not the discussion point here.

Stated differently, can salt water produce enough electricity to desalinate salt water?

#26 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-06-10 10:57 PM | Reply

Might it be possible that the plant in questions burns so much oil that it is able to provide the electricity needed for desalinization and also provide electricity for other uses?

My impression was they just use huge oil fired boilers to distill the water and drive turbines with the steam to generate electricity.

#27 | Posted by REDIAL at 2021-06-10 11:02 PM | Reply

@#27 ... My impression was they just use huge oil fired boilers to distill the water and drive turbines with the steam to generate electricity. ...

OK, so it seems the desalinization is not the electricity generator.

Many thanks for following up.


#28 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-06-10 11:08 PM | Reply

California has plenty of water for people, it is running out of water for farms. End farm subsidies and make them pay market rates for water. Solved.

#29 | Posted by bored at 2021-06-10 11:08 PM | Reply

OK, so it seems the desalinization is not the electricity generator.

No. Sorry if I gave that impression. It a distillation plant... I assume they drive turbines with steam for power before they condense it.

Struck me as a company that probably had a lot of political clout on an island with no natural source of water.

#30 | Posted by REDIAL at 2021-06-10 11:16 PM | Reply

@#29 ... End farm subsidies ...

Probably as likely to happen as ending fossil fuel subsidies.


(aside: for all the complaining the GOP does about federal taxes, an amazing amount of federal money goes to industries in red states. Jus' sayin'...)

#31 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-06-10 11:21 PM | Reply

@28 - they most likely use the waste heat from the diesel/generators to distill water.

#32 | Posted by jakester at 2021-06-10 11:38 PM | Reply

#28 - diesel engines are about 45% efficient. That's a lot of wasted thermal energy. Why not distill water using it?

#33 | Posted by jakester at 2021-06-10 11:42 PM | Reply

Stated differently, can salt water produce enough electricity to desalinate salt water?

^
That is a great explanation of the Second Law of Thermodynamics. I'm definitely going to borrow that.

#34 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-06-10 11:47 PM | Reply

@#34

Oh, so you caught that.

                    :)

#35 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-06-10 11:57 PM | Reply

carlsbaddesal.sdcwa.org

We already desalinate

Coastal CA will be OK. We also have sunny skies and lots of places to put solar.

Orange county purifies waste water and injects it back into the aquifer...which makes it dirtier but removes the ick factor for locals.

#36 | Posted by dibblda at 2021-06-11 03:16 AM | Reply

I can't ever remember a time when someone wasn't predicting the demise of CA and going on and on about how people are leaving in droves because of taxes or whutevahhhhh. Yet it remains the wealthiest most populous big @$$ state in the country.

I left CA decades ago and there were millions of people wanting to fill the vacancy I left. I know too that even though I no longer desire to live there evidence suggests that there are plenty of people who do want to live there regardless of what everyone says.

The state is a global economic leader in so many areas of business productivity that if one business fails there are plenty of others to pick up the slack.

You can call it expensive, crazy, or anything else but can't call CA overrated. Most complaints about the impossibility of CA are just so much sour grapes.

It's not a socialist state it's just that wealth requires a lot of taxes to maintain itself. Something republicl0wns don't seem to understand.

#37 | Posted by RightisTrite at 2021-06-11 10:59 AM | Reply

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