Advertisement

Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Saturday, September 04, 2021

Nearly 1 in 3 Americans live in a county hit by a weather disaster in the past three months, according to a new Washington Post analysis of federal disaster declarations.

More

Comments

Admin's note: Participants in this discussion must follow the site's moderation policy. Profanity will be filtered. Abusive conduct is not allowed.

Like so a many news stories here, this one is behind a paywall, so perhaps this question is answered within and I can't see it:

How far does this deviate from the norm?

#1 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 08:31 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

And forest fires are considered weather?

#2 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 08:32 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

When Ida rolled through PA, NJ, and NY, it was the most people in our nation's history under a flash flood warning.

#3 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-09-05 08:36 AM | Reply

I blame Trump...and uh...Elvis.

#4 | Posted by phesterOBoyle at 2021-09-05 08:37 AM | Reply

I survived a weather disaster this year, in which my Republican State government attempted to murder me with its childishly inadequate power grid.

#5 | Posted by Zed at 2021-09-05 08:49 AM | Reply

"Although wildfires are not an actual weather phenomenon, wildfires are directly related to weather." - www.weather.gov

Climate change is causing desertification in some areas.
Climate change affects the weather. Climate change drives the weather resulting in significant decreases in rain and increases in winds in some areas, and increased rain in others. For instance from hurricanes because the water is warmer, more moisture, more uptake, and more flash flooding. For the West, we see extended dry periods and more and larger forest fires as a result of the weather.

Is this actually complicated for some people? Seriously asking. Seems incredibly obvious to me, which is why I'm asking.

#6 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 08:53 AM | Reply

#5: "Are power outtages weather events?" - asking for a friend.

#7 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 08:54 AM | Reply

#5: "Are power outtages weather events?" - asking for a friend.

#7 | POSTED BY YAV

If Gov. Abbott were Muslim we'd have sent Navy SEALS to shoot him.

#8 | Posted by Zed at 2021-09-05 08:57 AM | Reply

Some people can complicate even the simplest things. Often on purpose. It's just another way to be a doubting Thomas.

#9 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-09-05 08:58 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

"Is this actually complicated for some people? Seriously asking."

Seriously answering.

Wildfires are mainly caused by suppression of natural forces so that humans can encroach and build in forests. Suppression of natural, smaller fires allows buildup of flammable material that would otherwise been burned under natural conditions. This has been known for decades and the state has tried to emulate nature with controlled burns. But it obviously isn't enough.

Then of course there is the human factor in that wildfires are usually caused by humans by failing to extinguish campfires, the unthinking toss of a cigarette, etc.

But I wouldn't call wildfires human because humans are the biggest factor in wildfires.

#10 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 09:06 AM | Reply

""Although wildfires are not an actual weather phenomenon..."

This answered my #2. Thank you.

#11 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 09:09 AM | Reply

"Although wildfires are not an actual weather phenomenon, wildfires are directly related to weather."

#12 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 09:31 AM | Reply

I survived a weather disaster this year, in which my Republican State government attempted to murder me with its childishly inadequate power grid.

#5 | POSTED BY ZED AT 2021-09-05 08:49 AM | REPLY

Maybe you guys in Texas should name your power grid "uterus" so the government will regulate it.

#13 | Posted by Alexandrite at 2021-09-05 09:32 AM | Reply | Funny: 2 | Newsworthy 1

#12 - the repetition isn't necessary.

My question was answered in the first 8 words of your #6 screed.

#14 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 09:58 AM | Reply

Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) becomes UTERUS; Unreliable Texas Energy, Rarely USable?

#15 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 10:02 AM | Reply

My question was answered in the first 8 words of your #6 screed.

Here's another 8 words that you can take and ignore the rest:

"Direct injection of Clorox bleach kills SARS-CoV-2 virus, but will also do considerable damage and likely lead to death, so do not under any circumstance, inject bleach into the human body."

#16 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 10:16 AM | Reply

#16 - I did not ask about bleach. But the troll is duly noted, yav.

#17 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 10:17 AM | Reply

Seriously, yav, you need to do whatever necessary to get me out from under your skin and out of your head. At first I found your obsession with me hilarious, then mildly amusing, then WTF, but now it's just downright creepy.

#18 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 10:20 AM | Reply

Oh. And screed?

LOL! You think #6 is a screed?

noun
1 a long speech or piece of writing, typically one regarded as tedious: her criticism appeared in the form of screeds in a local film magazine.
Whatever, snowflake.

WTF happened to plonking me? Best get to it!

#19 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 10:22 AM | Reply

Maybe you guys in Texas should name your power grid "uterus" so the government will regulate it.

#13 | POSTED BY ALEXANDRITE

At least half the State never wanted such a law. It will be sabotaged and evaded, with extreme cleverness and without a shred of guilt.

#20 | Posted by Zed at 2021-09-05 10:27 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"WTF happened to plonking me?"

It was suggested to me by two different posters that I plonked too many people. I told them I didn't think so, but that I would unplonk a few and see how it goes. I reluctantly did so, knowing what would happen. You and a couple of others have confirmed my reluctance wasn't for naught.

Oh, and screed? Yep, yours was several times longer than the eight words it needed to be and was quite tedious.

Again, please make an honest attempt to extricate me from your head. It's no secret that you have made obsessives and trolling posts towards me completely unprovided. I have NEVER made a gratuities post about you. The only time I have spoken to or about you is in a reply to you. Please honor my request and stop obsessing over me.

#21 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 10:35 AM | Reply

I really hope so, Zed, and I hope we can learn from and use those tactics here!

Watching Texas decline has been difficult for me. We have such a family history in that state. To make things worse, I myself was born and raised in Florida, so I'm watching this state go to hell, too. So the two states I spent the majority of my life in and have most of my relatives in are fast becoming s-holes. It is infuriating.

On the subject of this thread, weather events that are so dramatic are only part of what's going on here. We're having way too much rain, and the mosquitos are everywhere. Insects in general are loving it. The quality of life is not what it used to be.

#22 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 10:35 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

{yawn}

#23 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 10:36 AM | Reply

#21 - now that's a screed!

#24 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 10:37 AM | Reply

I hope that yawn is saying, "Yes, I'll try to stop obsessing over your, Jakester".

#25 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 10:37 AM | Reply

#24 - yes it was.

#26 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 10:38 AM | Reply

This article is a wake-up call.

And we keep building in bad locations, expanding, across the world.
But even with that all removed, the damage from just the change in climate and the ensuing changes in weather are way, way more destructive, frequent, and costly. The charts and images are dramatic.

The data on increasing intensity per decade for cyclones/hurricanes was also stunning. I think we all kind of felt that was happening, but to see it quantified (summarized in this article, and detailed inwww.washingtonpost.com made it concrete.

I'm' afraid that the past few hurricanes, Cat 1 going to the upper end of Cat 4 in just a few hours, shows what we're going to be facing for years to come. The entire disaster response plan is going to have to be updated. Forecasting is going to have to get a lot better, or we're going to have to start preparing for Cat 5's when we see Cat 1's approaching. And that's just over hurricanes, not all the other events.

#27 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 10:51 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

@#13 ... Maybe you guys in Texas should name your power grid "uterus" so the government will regulate it. ...

Related cartoon...

www.usnews.com


#28 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-09-05 12:06 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#28 - Yep. THAT!

#29 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 12:18 PM | Reply

'Wildfires are mainly caused by suppression of natural forces so that humans can encroach and build in forests."

^
The above crock of ---- seems to be a roundabout way of saying:

"I see again the forest fires are starting.
They're starting again in California. I said, you gotta clean your floors, you gotta clean your forests " there are many, many years of leaves and broken trees and they're like, like, so flammable, you touch them and it goes up."

#Make America Rake Again

#30 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-09-05 12:34 PM | Reply

@#27 ... Forecasting is going to have to get a lot better ...

The big issue with forecasting hurricanes is a lack of important data.

Important data is the meteorological data (temperature, dewpoint, wind speed and direction, etc.) at the air-water boundary, i.e., within the few feet above the water. That layer, so close to the turbulent water's surface, is where much the interesting developments of a hurricane's cycle occur.

The problem with getting that important data is that one cannot fly the hurricane hunter planes at that altitude due to the waves and wind conditions. Ditto for trying to fly drones for any useful duration at that low altitude (this may change, though. Drones are improving.).

So what the weather service is left with is dropping instrument packages from higher-flying planes at certain spots within a storm. But that does not provide enough of the important data to provide significant improvements in the forecasting.

#31 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-09-05 12:43 PM | Reply

The above crock of ----

Yes. Yes indeed it is. It was amazingly ignorant and self-serving for a bias that was already pathetically lacking evidence or substance.

#32 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 12:44 PM | Reply

I agree Lamplighter, so it's going to take stepping back and rethinking the entire approach. This is interesting enough to make me want to go back to college, but I'd hate to take up a seat of someone younger with years left to give. Frustrating!

#33 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 12:46 PM | Reply

The problem with getting that important data is that one cannot fly the hurricane hunter planes at that altitude due to the waves and wind conditions.

Too bad subs are so slow.

#34 | Posted by REDIAL at 2021-09-05 12:48 PM | Reply

"The big issue with forecasting hurricanes is a lack of important data."

That has been the bane of weather forecasters since weather forecast began, and it will always be why weather forecasting will be an imprecise science. Chaos reigns. If a butterfly flapping its wings in Africa can mean whether or not a hurricane is born and ravages the Gulf Coast, we will never have all the data necessary. Even if we had all the data (impossible) it would take unimaginable computing power to process it all.

#35 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 12:49 PM | Reply

@#34 ... subs ...

One alternative drone approach I've heard about is using rugged underwater drones (dropped by the hurricane-hunter planes) that surface occasionally, stick an instrument package into the air, then return underwater.


#36 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-09-05 12:53 PM | Reply

This was predicted and expected. People keep moving into vulnerable areas. Something has to change.

But ... ... is it necessary to call hot weather in a region a disaster?

Specifically the Pacific Northwest recently.

People experienced hotter than normal temperatures for a few weeks. We're going to equate that to losing your home in a fire or flood?

And please ... ..before someone calls me a denier ... .I'm not suggesting we ignore any of it nor blame this on a cycle or pattern and pretend it's not impacted by humans.

I just think experiencing hot weather for a few weeks is not a disaster.

#37 | Posted by eberly at 2021-09-05 12:55 PM | Reply

That might be viable assuming they are recoverable.

#38 | Posted by REDIAL at 2021-09-05 12:55 PM | Reply

@#38 ... ewcoverable ...

While it would be a feature if the drone were recoverable, so long as the data are quickly recoverable the drone does not have to be quickly recoverable.

So then it becomes a datacomm issue, for which there are possible solutions.

#39 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-09-05 12:59 PM | Reply

There were several hundred deaths due to that "few weeks" of "hotter than normal" temperatures. It wasn't just hotter. It was ridiculously hotter. If that was all it was going to be, just a few weeks and not going to happen again, or it wasn't going to get worse, maybe some less expensive mitigation could be done. They just don't build for heat like that there, nor do they in Chicago.

#40 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 01:00 PM | Reply

"The above crock of ----

Yes. Yes indeed it is. It was amazingly ignorant and self-serving for a bias that was already pathetically lacking evidence or substance."

No, it isn't obsessed one:

Fire has always been a part of Oregon's landscape. Many plants and animals depend on the recyled nutrients and healthy ecosystems that nature wildfires produce. But after more than a century of suppressing wildfires, our dry forests are overgrown with fuel that causes larger, more intense and severe wildfires.

The science is clear. Controlled"or prescribed"burns combined with ecological thinning are a proven way to restore Oregon's dry forests. By managing the natural process of fire on the landscape, instead of preventing it, we can improve habitats for native plants and animals and reduce the risk of out-of-control wildfires.


www.nature.org

#41 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 01:02 PM | Reply

so long as the data are quickly recoverable the drone does not have to be quickly recoverable.

I guess the word I was looking for was reusable. Being fiscally responsible and all.

#42 | Posted by REDIAL at 2021-09-05 01:03 PM | Reply

"If a butterfly flapping its wings in Africa can mean whether or not a hurricane is born and ravages the Gulf Coast, we will never have all the data necessary."

Never enough data to say global warming is real?

Classic "Jakester!"

#43 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-09-05 01:07 PM | Reply

40

I know. People aren't prepared for that kind of heat.

And the death toll is real.

It's just silly to me to equate a family living in Oregon with air conditioning and access to everything they need with a family on the Atlantic coast who's home is gone.

If you lived through a disaster then maybe you should have experienced a loss of some sort.

#44 | Posted by eberly at 2021-09-05 01:07 PM | Reply

Well when a city in Canada reaches 121 degrees something is wrong.

The record for Phoenix AZ is 122.

#45 | Posted by bruceaz at 2021-09-05 01:09 PM | Reply

@#42 ... reusable ...

Yeah. I was thinking of something along the lines of... after reporting for a while, the drone goes dormant until the hurricane passes by, then floats to the surface and turns on a location beacon.

There is a satellite network already set up for that.

#46 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-09-05 01:18 PM | Reply

"I know. People aren't prepared for that kind of heat."

Exactly. People prepare for the norm. The northern states do not prepare for heat waves, just as the southern states do not prepare for abnormal cold snaps. Last February's cold spell in Texas where some places had temperatures 20 degrees below what was ever recorded there suffered.

#47 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 01:20 PM | Reply

#44 -Eberly, It's silly within that equivalence, yes, but it's not silly if when you look at the loss of loved ones. That heatwave took more than two times the lives lost from Ida. Both are going to cost money in mitigation and risk reduction. This is a good article that may help to wake up some folks.

#48 | Posted by YAV at 2021-09-05 01:22 PM | Reply

"Never enough data to say global warming is real?

Classic "Jakester!"

Putting words into people's mouths? (I never said not enough data to say global warming is real)

Twisting words/moving goalposts? (My quote was referencing weather, not climate change -- two different things)

Classic snoofy troll. He denies doing the things he just did.

But I'm sure no one here is surprised, of course.

#49 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 01:40 PM | Reply

---- off, dumbass.

#50 | Posted by LegallyYourDead at 2021-09-05 06:17 PM | Reply

#50 - aaaaaw. Legallyyourdead swoops down to defend Snoofy's honor even though what I said is 100% true and verifiable with a couple of strokes of the PGUP key.

Isn't that precious?

#51 | Posted by jakester at 2021-09-05 06:39 PM | Reply

"Putting words into people's mouths? (I never said not enough data to say global warming is real)"

You said it all the time, under a previous username, "Jakester."

And you're using the very same argument here, and quite notably on the predicted adverse weather pursuant to global warming. Which might as well be the same thing, but more accurately, one is the symptom, and the other is the cause.

Thanks for reading and understanding.

#52 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-09-05 06:42 PM | Reply

One in three - doubtful.

#53 | Posted by MSgt at 2021-09-06 08:17 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

Comments are closed for this entry.

Home | Breaking News | Comments | User Blogs | Stats | Back Page | RSS Feed | RSS Spec | DMCA Compliance | Privacy | Copyright 2021 World Readable

Drudge Retort