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Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Thursday, October 14, 2021

Missouri Governor Mike Parson wants to prosecute a journalist who warned the state that a government website left school teachers and administrators' Social Security numbers exposed.

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It's Missouri.
He's a Republican.
In a position of responsibility and power.
Fuhgedaboudit.

#1 | Posted by Doc_sarvis at 2021-10-14 04:25 PM | Reply

This is the dumbest political-adjacent thing I've seen on the internet today.

#2 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2021-10-14 04:36 PM | Reply

Republican politicians seem to be in a contest to be hailed as the stupidest person in America.

#3 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY at 2021-10-14 04:55 PM | Reply

---- I-D-I-O-T

#4 | Posted by LegallyYourDead at 2021-10-14 05:00 PM | Reply

The Gov is hoping to revive the age-old political technique of shooting the messenger. A simple 'thank you, we'll look into this' would have sufficed...

#5 | Posted by catdog at 2021-10-14 05:36 PM | Reply

Talk about a lack of gratitude.

#6 | Posted by Tor at 2021-10-14 05:38 PM | Reply

Republican politicians seem to be in a contest to be hailed as the stupidest person in America. #3 | POSTED BY AMERICANUNITY

Failing to understand computers, the internet, and other tech topics as a politician is definitely a bipartisan effort.

#7 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2021-10-14 05:57 PM | Reply

TOR

"Talk about a lack of gratitude."

It seems Governor Parsons of Illinois lack of gratitude is because he secretly wanted the Social Security numbers of teachers and administrators to be public.

Why he decided to expose himself to ridicule by calling for the prosecution of a well meaning journalist is a bit of a mystery. The foolishness of Trump himself must be contagious.

#8 | Posted by Twinpac at 2021-10-14 06:08 PM | Reply

OK boomer.

#9 | Posted by SunTzuMeow at 2021-10-14 06:08 PM | Reply

Major props to the journalist / security researcher for handling the vulnerability ethically as well, they did not report on the vulnerability until the state government took down the site or otherwise fixed the disclosure.

#10 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2021-10-14 06:12 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

Being a Cloud Arch/DevOps guy... This is painful. At some point it must be physical painful to be this ignorant.

#11 | Posted by kwrx25 at 2021-10-14 06:19 PM | Reply

More from the cited article...

...The way the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Renaud handled the situation appears to be a textbook example of ethical disclosure of a bug. The paper reported having found the bug in the web app set up to allow the public to search teacher certifications and credentials. More than 100,000 SSns were exposed, according to the paper.

Once the paper alerted the state government, the department fixed the bug on Tuesday, and the paper published its story on Wednesday, once there were no risks for the teachers whose SSNs were exposed.

Parson's comments are also a textbook example of government officials seemingly not having any clue how technology works, and vilifying people who do ethical security research as criminals, rather than simply thanking them for doing a public service that makes us all safer.

"The newspaper delayed publishing this report to give the department time to take steps to protect teachers' private information, and to allow the state to ensure no other agencies' web applications contained similar vulnerabilities," the St. Louis Post-Dispatch wrote in its article....


#12 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-10-14 06:33 PM | Reply

It is the "show me" state, after all.

Gov's an idiot. GeezusKeriest.

#13 | Posted by YAV at 2021-10-14 06:55 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

A few years ago, I was doing my usual WI-NR form for a client who did a two-week gig in Wisconsin every year. I was expecting him to owe a small amount, as he did every year, since this was 1099 work, ao any profit he made in the year pro-rated to WI, even if the WI trip was actually a loss leader.

Instead, the software took out the tax due, and reduced the liability to zero.

I looked at the form, and then the instructions, and thought I must've done something wrong, since neither one allowed the credit which eliminated the taxes due. So I overrode the software, took the credit out, and had my client pay the full tax liability.

WI refunded his money.

I called the tax office in Madison, and asked the nice lady if she could walk me through, and show me what I did wrong, so I wouldn't make the same mistake again. When we got to that line, she said, "those folks aren't eligible for that credit". I agreed. She went and got her boss, who had me walk through it again, and then he admitted it was an error in their equation. I asked if my clients would be billed; he said probably not (they weren't).

Now I realize I should've asked IF I WOULD BE ARRESTED FOR FINDING THE ERROR.

#14 | Posted by Danforth at 2021-10-14 07:11 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

Failing to understand computers, the internet, and other tech topics as a politician is definitely a bipartisan effort.
#7 | POSTED BY GONOLES92

This isn't a matter of failing to to understand the internet. Parson clearly explained what happened and what law he thinks was broken. His own explanation of what occurred makes it clear that the law he cited was not violated. That law, Section 569.095, RSMo, specifically states that the data must have been accessed without authorization. Webpage source code on a public site is freely available to anyone who browses the page. This reporter did the digital equivalent of looking down and finding money on the ground that other people had walked past.

The fact is that Mike Parson's administration has been inadvertently publishing this data on the web and anyone who visited the page in question would have downloaded it. They might even still have it sitting in their browser cache of loaded in an open tab that they haven't refreshed in a few days. Chances are pretty good that this reporter is not the only person to have found it but thankfully he did and that he alerted the state so they could fix it before he went public with the story.

This is Mike Parson knowing full well that his administration got caught making an easily avoidable mistake that had it been a private company would have likely resulted in every single employee responsible for it all the way up to the Chief Information Officer filing for unemployment by now. This is Mike Parson pointing the blame at the one person in the whole story who did the right thing.

#15 | Posted by johnny_hotsauce at 2021-10-14 07:14 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

14 | POSTED BY DANFORTH

Hey, I learned about 1031 exchanges the other day and wow ... whole new world opened up.

#16 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2021-10-14 07:23 PM | Reply

"I learned about 1031 exchanges the other day and wow ... whole new world opened up."

Be very wary of the brand new restrictions. If you were learning about Like-Kind 1031 exchanges via the old law...start over.

www.doorloop.com

#17 | Posted by Danforth at 2021-10-14 07:26 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2


#15 | POSTED BY JOHNNY_HOTSAUCE

Good explanation of the situation. It's just really cringe to me that the Guv'na explained the situation as if it was a "hack," unauthorized accesss to an endpoint, where the CFAA could be applicable, versus the researcher/journalist accessing publicly accessible data -_-

#18 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2021-10-14 07:30 PM | Reply

If you were learning about Like-Kind 1031 exchanges via the old law...start over. -danforth

Appreciate the link! Diving into the current details. I have no current plans to act on this type of exchange, but the existence of it is definitely fascinating to me, and has me considering future personal capital expenditures.

#19 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2021-10-14 07:40 PM | Reply

GoNoles giving a great example of how he hasn't really changed.

He will get right back on that Trump Train the moment he thinks he will profit from it.

Angling for that government handout any way he can get it.

#20 | Posted by snoofy at 2021-10-14 08:05 PM | Reply

This is what happens when people say HTML is a programming language and not markup

#21 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2021-10-15 07:39 AM | Reply

I looked at the form, and then the instructions, and thought I must've done something wrong, since neither one allowed the credit which eliminated the taxes due. So I overrode the software, took the credit out, and had my client pay the full tax liability.

WI refunded his money.

I have the same situation with NYS with a client that is Canadian, but has nexus. Filed the return and paid the $1,500 tax. They get a check for the amount back with the notice saying that liability was zero. Called the state, they said they are a foreign corporation with no obligation to file. I told them they had over $1,000,000 in sales so they had "economic nexus" in NYS. He told me the states software hasn't caught up to the law that was passed in 2016. Ugh.
So every year I file, pay the tax and they get it refunded.

#22 | Posted by Nixon at 2021-10-15 10:33 AM | Reply

Didn't even have to read the article to know this had to be a Republican Governor.

"This is what happens when people say ... "

This is what happens when people vote ignorant morons into high political office.

#23 | Posted by donnerboy at 2021-10-15 10:36 AM | Reply

Be very wary of the brand new restrictions.

What's hilarious is old law a trade in vehicle basis was added to the new vehicle.

Now you can't. The old vehicle is sold for the trade in amount.

I had a client dispose of the Audi they used in the business...his undepreciated carryover cost as $278,000 due to numerous previous trade ins and the trade in was $30,000. Deductible loss of $248,000.

Just another tax break for the wealthy.

#24 | Posted by Nixon at 2021-10-15 10:53 AM | Reply

Just another tax break for the wealthy.

#24 | POSTED BY NIXON

And "bonus depreciation." O___O

#25 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2021-10-15 11:36 AM | Reply

@#15 ... The fact is that Mike Parson's administration has been inadvertently publishing this data on the web and anyone who visited the page in question would have downloaded it. ...

Couldn't the state be liable for breaking privacy laws? Or does the state have a privacy policy that states it may publish for public consumption personal information given to it?

If there is a state liability, could the Governor be trying to head off the lawsuits by making the "view source" access illegal?

#26 | Posted by LampLighter at 2021-10-15 12:11 PM | Reply

Couldn't the state be liable for breaking privacy laws?
#26 | POSTED BY LAMPLIGHTER

I imagine they likely will be. Wouldn't be the first time a state leaked data and had to pay for it. Parson's claim is going nowhere. Missouri GOP lives to make claims that no court would ever uphold. Just look at all of the lawsuits our current AG has lost.

#27 | Posted by johnny_hotsauce at 2021-10-15 04:04 PM | Reply

MO- low gas prices and low IQs... the state is all about spending federal dollars for hayseed ideas. Never mind that you can't fill up your car with gas without worrying about being robbed.

#28 | Posted by Brennnn at 2021-10-15 07:05 PM | Reply

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