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Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Thursday, September 29, 2022

Extremely dangerous conditions persist in Florida as Hurricane Ian, now a tropical storm, moved north up the Atlantic coast, leaving a trail of destruction. As search and rescue efforts ramp up, the death toll remained unclear. Lee County Sheriff Carmine Marceno told "Good Morning America" the fatalities are likely "in the hundreds," ...

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The photos at the link above are devastating. One can only imagine how long it will take for the areas hardest hit to return to any semblance of normalcy.

Here is one of the unbelievable shots.

#1 | Posted by tonyroma at 2022-09-29 03:59 PM | Reply

#1 That just looks like Key West after Fantasy Fest.

Anyway, I hope DeSantis has a plan for cholera.

#2 | Posted by snoofy at 2022-09-29 05:42 PM | Reply

Welcome to your Chinese Hoax.

#3 | Posted by zarnon at 2022-09-29 08:44 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

They're all just crisis actors. The whole thing was staged to make people give in to the climate change hoax nazis.

#4 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2022-09-29 09:22 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

Phew! Florida dodged a bullet!

-boaz

#5 | Posted by jpw at 2022-09-29 09:32 PM | Reply

Yay! Free boats!

~Lewzer

#6 | Posted by REDIAL at 2022-09-29 09:43 PM | Reply

#5
Some bullet, some dodge.

#7 | Posted by Doc_Sarvis at 2022-09-30 05:22 AM | Reply

I take it DeSatan suddenly wants to be Joe Biden's best friend.

#8 | Posted by RJSquirrel at 2022-09-30 05:26 AM | Reply

SQUIRRELY

"I take it DeSatan suddenly wants to be Joe Biden's best friend."

You really are shortsighted, aren't you? Combined with not too terribly bright.

What he really wants is to take credit for everything President Biden does to help Florida in the aftermath of Hurrican Ian.

Unrelated but still in the "what he wants" category, is to inherit the leadership and loyalty of the Proud Boys who are now, with the help of DeSantis, firmly encamped in leadership positions of Miami Dade County ~ which happens to be the largest Republican voting bloc county in the state.

#9 | Posted by Twinpac at 2022-09-30 06:49 AM | Reply

DeathSantis wants help? Same DeathSantis that as a Tea Party hothead voted against New York getting relief from Hurricane Sandy?

Help the people of Florida, but flush this DeSantis turd while you do it if you can.

#10 | Posted by YAV at 2022-09-30 08:32 AM | Reply

This all happened because of all the sinners in Florida. You can't deceive and fly migrants to a different place than told and not expect consequences. God must really hate Florida right now.

#11 | Posted by Enlightened at 2022-09-30 08:45 AM | Reply

Not the superbird. Let's hope it was a clone.

#12 | Posted by bus_driver at 2022-09-30 08:56 AM | Reply

Florida is ------.

Most homeowners insurance, even in Florida, covers wind and storm damage but not flood damage. Only about 1 in 10 homes in Florida have flood insurance. So...this is gonna be a huge hit to Florida.

Florida has also played fast and loose with its insurance market for years including allowing bare minimum policies. So huge numbers of homes won't be covered fully by insurance.

Basically the Feds are going to have to bail out Florida because of Florida's Freedumb.

#13 | Posted by Sycophant at 2022-09-30 09:01 AM | Reply

-Basically the Feds are going to have to bail out Florida because of Florida's Freedumb.

relative to other gulf coast states, Florida seems to do a better job of managing hurricane events.

Louisiana, for example, was and still is a complete ---- show. Katrina was a good example of it. Another is the current environment of availability of insurance for homeowners.

#14 | Posted by eberly at 2022-09-30 09:42 AM | Reply

"Seems to do a better job"

How so?
What does Florida do differently that other gulf states? Be specific

#15 | Posted by ChiefTutMoses at 2022-09-30 10:06 AM | Reply

Apparently FL has a state sponsored insurance program that has billion in surplus. It's for those who can't get insurance thru private carriers (many who have pulled out or way over charge).

But again, this will not cover flooding which is only acquirable thru the Feds. And a lot of people who own their homes apparently roll the dice in a effort to save on cost.

#16 | Posted by brass30 at 2022-09-30 10:07 AM | Reply

Half of New Orleans is below sea level.

#17 | Posted by YAV at 2022-09-30 10:20 AM | Reply

Yay! Free boats!

~Lewzer

#6 | POSTED BY REDIAL

Comments That Don't Help in the Aftermath of a Hurricane

Then he saw the yacht.

It was beached in a resident's backyard.

"Is this your boat? Or ... did it become your boat?"

Trump asked the man who lived in the house where the boat was now inadvertently and incongruously docked.

"At least you got a nice boat out of the deal," he said, with a smile.

#18 | Posted by donnerboy at 2022-09-30 10:23 AM | Reply

#16

Fla. insurance crisis deepens as rates soar, companies fall

Long known as the nation's most hurricane-prone state, Florida has achieved a new status that is aggravating hurricane anxieties and threatening real-estate values. Florida has the worst property-insurance market.

Four Florida insurance companies have declared bankruptcy since April, and others are canceling or not renewing policies. Hundreds of thousands of people have been forced to buy property coverage through the state-created insurer of last resort, Citizens Property Insurance Corp. The number of Citizens policies recently passed 1 million for the first time since early 2014 and could reach nearly 2 million by the end of 2023, according to a Citizens projection.

Floridians now have the highest property-insurance rates in the nation, according to the industry-funded Insurance Information Institute. The average premium is $4,231 - nearly triple the U.S. average of $1,544. "It's reached a point where Floridians cannot find affordable coverage for their homes," Institute spokesperson Mark Friedlander said. "It is going to eventually catch up with our booming real estate market and bring down values of property."

At the same time, from October through June, nearly 160,000 Floridians dropped the flood insurance policies they bought from the Federal Emergency Management Agency as it raised rates on some homeowners. Flood insurance is separate from homeowners' coverage.

Gilway, the Citizens CEO, said at a July meeting that Citizens has $13.6 billion in reserves to pay insurance claims. Citizens is not equipped to handle hundreds of thousands of claims that a major storm would generate.

"Citizens is selling insurance at a loss. There's no better way to say it," Friedlander of the insurance institute said.
The discounted rates have compounded the difficulties for insurance companies, said Ulrich of the insurance agents group.
"There are companies that would like to write business, but you simply can't do it when the Citizens premium is 30 to 40 percent less than what the voluntary market charges," Ulrich said.

https://www.eenews.net/articles/fla-insurance-crisis-deepens-as-rates-soar-companies-fall/

The ticking timebomb of Florida's way overleveraged state-created home insurer has just gone off and the repercussions and reverberations of this $100 billion plus hurricane is going to roil the markets for the foreseeable future. Or am I missing something?

#19 | Posted by tonyroma at 2022-09-30 10:28 AM | Reply

-What does Florida do differently that other gulf states? Be specific

They are very deliberate about designating zones where property is located in order for insurance carriers to follow and appropriately apply hurricane coverage differences in those zones.

The policy holders may not even realize how it works but it is a system insurance carriers follow to accurate underwrite everything.

That might not make sense but that results in homeowners understanding their coverages better than they typically do in other states like Louisiana.

#20 | Posted by eberly at 2022-09-30 10:35 AM | Reply

19

It's a real challenge to be sure, Tony.

What complicates this even worse is (and I don't want to get too far into the weeds here) is the distinction between a non-admitted vs an admitted carrier.

I'd have to do the research but I'll bet a lot of these companies going broke are non-admitted carriers.

There are many differences between these types of companies but one huge distinction is the State's guarantee fund they have available to ensure claims get paid to policyholders in the event the carrier becomes insolvent.

Admitted carriers are protected by that fund....non-admitted carriers are NOT.

If those bankrupt carriers are non-admitted, then Florida doesn't help them with claims and policyholders are screwed. Hell, they're all sort of screwed but the nonadmitted carrier policyholders are REALLY screwed.

and before anybody jumps to conclusions....it's absolutely disclosed to policyholders they are buying from a non-admitted carrier. At least it is in my state.

If you're doing any research on this Tony....keep in mind that "non-admitted" means the same as "excess and surplus" should you see those terms.

#21 | Posted by eberly at 2022-09-30 10:47 AM | Reply

-Half of New Orleans is below sea level.

And yet....not a designated flood plain.

-But again, this will not cover flooding which is only acquirable thru the Feds. And a lot of people who own their homes apparently roll the dice in a effort to save on cost.

remember this is an option only for folks who own their homes outright. If there is a lien....they'll require the flood insurance.

#22 | Posted by eberly at 2022-09-30 10:49 AM | Reply

-At the same time, from October through June, nearly 160,000 Floridians dropped the flood insurance policies they bought from the Federal Emergency Management Agency as it raised rates on some homeowners. Flood insurance is separate from homeowners' coverage.

Watch what happens......a bunch of those folks are going to claim they didn't know what they were doing and their agent didn't explain to them what they were giving up in coverage by not keeping the flood coverage.

So the agents better have documented those events where they policyholder choose not to renew their flood coverage.

If not......then the agent better have good professional liability coverage....cause they're gonna need it.

#23 | Posted by eberly at 2022-09-30 10:51 AM | Reply

From Tony's link......

"Earlier this year, Citizens sought a 10.7 percent rate increase. But the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation approved an average increase of 7.4 percent."

This is an example of how Florida has done a ------ job of managing the hurricane exposure the citizens of Florida face. Yes, I just argued they do a better job than other gulf coast states....but this is not a good practice.

When those requested rate increases were denied, the Florida Office of Insurance regulation thought they were doing it's citizens a favor.

We'll see........when the insurance market runs for the hills and folks are left with even worse options and the state has to step in a subsidized this ---- show, they'll reflect back on their decision to limit a NEEDED price increase on rates.

BTW, this is what the State of Louisiana has been guilty of for many many years. It's also why a lot of insurance companies won't go near Louisiana. A hostile insurance department.

#24 | Posted by eberly at 2022-09-30 10:57 AM | Reply

Ebs, I posted a thread based on the above link's article.

As it regards non-admitted, you're absolutely correct - the carriers going insolvent were hammered by their policies in LA. They were not backed by Citizens, and Citizens also is way undercapitalized and is limited by the FL legislature in what it can charge for premiums.

The legislature had a special session this year under DeSantis but they only legislated tort reform and did not adjust premiums nor raise reserve limits. This could very well turn out to be DeSanitis' and the FL GOP's Waterloo as soon as tens of thousands of homeowners will not have the resources to rebuild their homes because the state ignored the elephant sitting in the living room.

I read that FEMA can authorize $37K for rebuilding and another $37k to replace personal property like cars and belongings, but with the price of real estate in SE Florida, that money won't rebuild a kitchen, much less an entire home - unless your home has wheels.

Since this is your bailiwick, I'm extremely interested in how you view this situation.

#25 | Posted by tonyroma at 2022-09-30 10:57 AM | Reply

-This could very well turn out to be DeSanitis' and the FL GOP's Waterloo as soon as tens of thousands of homeowners will not have the resources to rebuild their homes because the state ignored the elephant sitting in the living room.

Yep. No question.

I'm headed to a meeting then off to see my daughter this weekend at K-State. It's dad's weekend. I won't have much time for this but I'd love to discuss more.

I imagine the issue will be waiting on us next week..........

#26 | Posted by eberly at 2022-09-30 11:09 AM | Reply

Florida will do just fine.

Climate change crazies are trying to play this hurricane up all they can, because they know there may not be another one this year to come into contact with the U.S. mainland. There's more damage because there's more people, more stick built houses. I heard someone say on the news, most of the houses surviving are the ones which are brick, cement, new ones built in the last few years on different code.

Florida will do fine, they have done this before. It wont be a Katrina.

#27 | Posted by boaz at 2022-09-30 03:30 PM | Reply

Florida will do just fine.
Climate change crazies are trying to play this hurricane up all they can, because they know there may not be another one this year to come into contact with the U.S. mainland. There's more damage because there's more people, more stick built houses. I heard someone say on the news, most of the houses surviving are the ones which are brick, cement, new ones built in the last few years on different code.
Florida will do fine, they have done this before. It wont be a Katrina.

#27 | POSTED BY BOAZ

You say this AFTER Florida has the second most damaging hurricane in its history and at a time the insurance market in Florida is DOA.

"The homes surviving" only means they are still there. They aren't livable.

But what do you care? You make your statement, run away and ignore all the trouble Florida will be facing over the next couple years.

#28 | Posted by Sycophant at 2022-09-30 04:59 PM | Reply

-Half of New Orleans is below sea level.
And yet....not a designated flood plain.

#22 | POSTED BY EBERLY

And this is the problem in Florida. Even for those with mortgages, many weren't required to have flood insurance because they weren't in designated flood plain. Yet they still flooded.

#29 | Posted by Sycophant at 2022-09-30 05:01 PM | Reply

SYCOPHANT

FEMA defines a floodplain as any land area susceptible to being inundated by floodwaters from any source.

A Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) is an area identified by the United States Federal Emergency Management Agency as an area with a special flood or mudflow, and/or flood related erosion hazard, as shown on a flood hazard boundary map or flood insurance rate map.

I'm not a map reader but the SFHA map looks to be twice the size of the floodplain map.

#30 | Posted by Twinpac at 2022-09-30 06:25 PM | Reply

Matt Gaetz Votes Against Disaster Relief Days After Hurricane Ian Hits

www.newsweek.com

#31 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY at 2022-09-30 07:55 PM | Reply

Republicants getting btfo by their imaginary god?

LOL, good.

I feel bad for the pets and farm animals.

Not for most of the humans.

#32 | Posted by billy_boy at 2022-09-30 08:56 PM | Reply

I heard someone say on the news, most of the houses surviving are the ones which are brick, cement, new ones built in the last few years on different code.

Do you understand that the "different code" was enacted by people who were responding to the reality of GW and the fact storms are more powerful today and that it takes stronger - more expensive - structures to survive them?

You rail against "crazies" in one sentence while blindly admitting that those same "crazies" are the reason everything wasn't destroyed by Ian - since they're the ones who pushed more stringent building codes - and implying that's those resistant structures are a good thing - with no connective understanding of why they were built that way.

You must be quite the pretzel. SMH...

#33 | Posted by tonyroma at 2022-09-30 09:18 PM | Reply

After surveying the damage from the air, Jared Moskowitz, a former state emergency management director, estimated that 80 percent of Fort Myers Beach and Sanibel Island might need to be rebuilt. A causeway that had been Sanibel's only road to the mainland was shorn apart by the storm, further isolating anyone who remained.

Mr. DeSantis, who earlier described the storm surge on the Sanibel as "biblical," on Friday offered a sobering assessment of the toll.

"If a house just washes away into the ocean, into the water, with 155-mile-per-hour winds, if that person evacuated, that's great," Mr. DeSantis said. "If they didn't, I don't know how you survive that."

Mr. DeSantis said on Thursday night that at least 700 people had been rescued, and later said rescuers had visited at least 3,000 homes in the worst-hit areas up and down the coast.

www.nytimes.com

I personally can't recall any hurricane that's left the amount of utter destruction that Ian has - especially in modern times. The only thing I can remember being as visually catastrophic was Camille in 1969, but it didn't hit a populated area like Ian did.

#34 | Posted by tonyroma at 2022-09-30 10:41 PM | Reply

TONY

If you recall, Hurricane Andrew, a Cat 5, did a number on Florida and Louisiana.

I saw the devastation in person when some friends and I were hauling truckloads of bottled water to the victims in Country Walk in Homestead which was leveled like it had been hit with an atomic bomb.

I didn't think I'd ever see a sight like that again. Yet, here we are, Deja Vue all over again.

#35 | Posted by Twinpac at 2022-10-01 03:35 AM | Reply

#35 | Posted by Twinpac

The most unusual post-Ian pic I've seen was a home with a single engine plane in their small backyard, nose down. Not a crash. Where the heck did THAT come from?

#36 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY at 2022-10-01 05:18 AM | Reply

AU

In the aftermath of Andrew there were pictures of a school bus sitting on the roof of a J.C. Penny store. And it didn't even have any wings.

During one hurricane (I don't remember which one) there were pictures of a twin engine Cessna at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University sitting upside down on it roof.

I expect we'll see a lot of strange things before this is over.

#37 | Posted by Twinpac at 2022-10-01 07:53 AM | Reply

Twin and AU,

I'll repost something I noted on another thread that illustrates my point as it regards the difference between Ian and Andrew. The type of destruction was equal, but the AMOUNT of destruction wasn't because Ian was around 3 times larger than Andrew.

Herein lies the difference between news reporting and Faux Gnus propaganda. Bill Nye just finished doing a segment on how hurricane Ian compared to both hurricanes Charly and Andrew which also impacted southern Florida in the past.

He held up a 10 3/8 inch diameter Chinet dinner plate and said that it represented the size of Ian. He then had a 2.25 inch diameter cupcake paper and stated that it in comparison it represented the size of Charly back in 2004. Lastly, he had a 2.88 inch diameter muffin paper and stated that it represented the size of Andrew. Both Charly and Andrew fit comfortably within the diameter of Ian and at least another 1 or possibly 2 more similar sized papers (storms) could have fit within the immenseness of Ian.

As a matter of fact, the entirety of Charly - also a Cat 4 hurricane when it reached landfall - would have fit within the eye of Ian. There was no preaching, just a thorough explanation of why and how storms like Ian evolve today due to the warmer waters and lessened wind flows which allow rapid intensification and longer and more voluminous amounts of rain to fall over the areas of the hurricane's travels.

#38 | Posted by tonyroma at 2022-10-01 08:59 AM | Reply

TONY

I don't think we were comparing velocity or size specifically. Certainly, all hurricanes in the 4 or 5 categories have the potential to do a lot of damage. I remember standing outside with the edge of the eye of Katrina directly over my head. It was an awesome sight. Later, I watched that same storm lift a full grown tree completely off the ground and set it back down (in place). The roots of that tree completely overturned a nearby building.

Our point was, strong compact hurricanes regardless of dimensions, can leave some very strange scenes in their wake. Who would ever expect to see a school bus on top of a building? Or watch an 18-wheeler tossed around like a straw? Or a yacht sitting in somebody's back yard 20 miles away? And those examples don't even scratch the surface.

#39 | Posted by Twinpac at 2022-10-02 04:13 AM | Reply

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