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Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Sunday, February 11, 2024

A member of the New York city council has introduced a bill that would ban detergent pods and laundry sheets that contain polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), a form of plastic that dissolves but leaves behind microplastics. Council member James Gennaro said, "The introduction of this bill is a clarion call to rally the scientific community, to to help out in this public policy question about what do we do about the fate of PVAs. I have a lot of concerns about what this does to aquatic ecosystems."

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... contain polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), a form of plastic that dissolves but leaves behind microplastics. ...

Babies are exposed to microplastics before they're even born (February 2022)
www.earth.com

... New research shows that microplastics can be found in human placentas and in newborns. This is especially important as plastics may have serious health consequences for people at any age.

"It's quite possible that children are more exposed to microplastics than adults, similar to children's greater exposure to many other environmental toxic chemicals," explained Kam Sripada, a neuroscientist from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

Rather than degrading and decomposing, plastics just break down into smaller and smaller microplastics, which break down into even tinier nanoplastics. ...


#1 | Posted by LampLighter at 2024-02-11 05:52 PM | Reply

A solution in search of a problem.

#2 | Posted by BellRinger at 2024-02-12 09:44 AM | Reply

Why not just ban PVAs?

If in many items, then why pick on PODs?

The science says ...

"It's quite possible that children are more exposed to microplastics than adults ...."

#3 | Posted by oneironaut at 2024-02-12 03:20 PM | Reply

"Why not just ban PVAs?"

Why not just ban oil.
Same answer.
Ask JeffJ if you require additional details.

#4 | Posted by snoofy at 2024-02-12 03:21 PM | Reply

#3

Gotta start somewhere.

Things nobody needs like tide pods seem like a good place to start.

How lazy do you have to be to use those stupid things anyway? Washing machines have dispensers for detergent and fabric softener, and have had them for decades. There's no valid reason to use a stupid pod.

Even when they didn't, I had a softener dispenser ball 30+ years ago. Fill it, close it, it opens itself in the first spin.

#5 | Posted by DarkVader at 2024-02-12 06:11 PM | Reply

Had recently read about microplastics in water bottles, nanoplastics....

"The researchers found that, on average, a liter of bottled water included about 240,000 tiny pieces of plastic.

About 90% of these plastic fragments were nanoplastics. This total was 10 to 100 times more plastic particles than seen in earlier studies, which mostly focused on larger microplastics."

www.nih.gov

... but I didn't know about pods.

Thanks for posting this, Rogers.

#6 | Posted by Corky at 2024-02-12 07:07 PM | Reply

Bravo. Microplastics are everyone's health problem.

#7 | Posted by e1g1 at 2024-02-12 08:24 PM | Reply

I had no idea. I also commend posting this story. We need some form of organized effort that makes a listing of these specific ingredients in products and whom manufactures with them. Unless they are scrubbing their runoff waste I imagine this is of concern to the local population and surrounding ecosystem.

The irony of "Cleaning Institute".

#8 | Posted by redlightrobot at 2024-02-12 09:33 PM | Reply

""The researchers found that, on average, a liter of bottled water included about 240,000 tiny pieces of plastic."

Happy Extinction!

#9 | Posted by snoofy at 2024-02-12 10:21 PM | Reply

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