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Tuesday, June 18, 2024

Apple supplier says new tech has 100 times the capacity of its current batteries.

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... Japan's TDK is claiming a breakthrough in materials used in its small solid-state batteries, with the Apple supplier predicting significant performance increases for devices from wireless headphones to smartwatches.

The new material provides an energy density"the amount that can be squeezed into a given space"of 1,000 watt-hours per liter, which is about 100 times greater than TDK's current battery in mass production. Since TDK introduced it in 2020, competitors have moved forward, developing small solid-state batteries that offer 50 Wh/l, while rechargeable coin batteries using traditional liquid electrolytes offer about 400 Wh/l, according to the group.

"We believe that our newly developed material for solid-state batteries can make a significant contribution to the energy transformation of society. We will continue the development towards early commercialisation," said TDK's chief executive Noboru Saito.

The batteries set to be produced will be made of an all-ceramic material, with oxide-based solid electrolyte and lithium alloy anodes. The high capability of the battery to store electrical charge, TDK said, would allow for smaller device sizes and longer operating times, while the oxide offered a high degree of stability and thus safety. The battery technology is designed to be used in smaller-sized cells, replacing existing coin-shaped batteries found in watches and other small electronics.

The breakthrough is the latest step forward for a technology industry experts think can revolutionize energy storage, but which faces significant obstacles on the path to mass production, particularly at larger battery sizes.

Solid-state batteries are safer, lighter and potentially cheaper and offer longer performance and faster charging than current batteries relying on liquid electrolytes. Breakthroughs in consumer electronics have filtered through to electric vehicles, although the dominant battery chemistries for the two categories now differ substantially. ...


#1 | Posted by LampLighter at 2024-06-18 12:17 AM | Reply

TDK?

Back in the day (30 or so years ago...) TDK cassette tapes (along with Maxell) wee the ones to use.

Interesting pivot for TDK into batteries.

#2 | Posted by LampLighter at 2024-06-18 12:18 AM | Reply

TDK cassette tapes

My go to. Maxell sux. :-)

#3 | Posted by REDIAL at 2024-06-18 12:51 AM | Reply

@#3 ... My go to. Maxell sux. :-) ...

Yeah, back in the day, I used an HP 200CD audio oscillator ( people.ohio.edu ) and HP 400L voltmeter ( www.qsl.net ) to calibrate my Harmon Kardon CD491 cassette deck.

Long story short, I was able to attain a frequency response of 18Hz up to 21KHz within +/-0.5dB for both Maxell and TDK tapes. But not both at the same time.

fwiw,that HK tape deck used constant current to drive the recording head, instead of the usual constant voltage. The result was a much smoother frequency response, especially in the below-100Hz region. I know, I measured it.

That indicated to me that if a cassette deck is ~adjusted~ for one brand of tape, then the other brands likely will not sound good.

Indeed. I still listen to the 96/24 digitization of those old cassette tapes.

I have to say, when the deck is properly adjusted, they do sound remarkably good. Even cassettes.

I still listen to the 96/24 digitization of my "old" cassette tapes, and I remain amazed how excellent they sound.

 

@#3 ... My go to. Maxell sux. :-) ...

Yeah, back in the day, I used an HP 200CD audio oscillator ( https://people.ohio.edu/postr/bapix/HP200CD.htm ) and HP 400L voltmeter ( https://www.qsl.net/wb4bxw/manuals-drawings/HP/400D-H-L_ac_volt_meter/400D-H-L_service_manual.pdf ) to calibrate my Harmon Kardon CD491 cassette deck. Long story short, I was able to attain a frequency response of 18Hz or to up to 21KHz within +/-0.5dB for both Maxell and TDK tapes. But not both at the same time.

fwiw,that HK tape deck used constant current to drive the recording head, instead of constant voltage. The result was a much smoother frequency response, especially in the below-100Hz region. I know, I measured it.

That indicated to me that if a cassette deck is ~adjusted~ for one, then the other likely will not sound good.

Indeed. I still listen to the 96/24 digitization of those old cassette tapes.

I have to say, they do sound remarkably good.




#4 | Posted by LampLighter at 2024-06-18 02:14 AM | Reply

Ooops, a posting issue.

Apologies.

#5 | Posted by LampLighter at 2024-06-18 02:15 AM | Reply

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