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Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Sunday, June 23, 2024

Government officials across the U.S. frequently promote the supposed, and often anecdotal, public safety benefits of automated license plate readers (ALPRs), but rarely do they examine how this very same technology poses risks to public safety that may outweigh the crimes they are attempting to address in the first place.

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Unlike location data a person shares with, say, GPS-based navigation app Waze, ALPRs collect and store this information without consent and there is very little a person can do to have this information purged from these systems.

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... When law enforcement uses ALPRs to document the comings and goings of every driver on the road, regardless of a nexus to a crime, it results in gargantuan databases of sensitive information, and few agencies are equipped, staffed, or trained to harden their systems against quickly evolving cybersecurity threats.

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), a component of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, released an advisory last week that should be a wake up call to the thousands of local government agencies around the country that use ALPRs to surveil the travel patterns of their residents by scanning their license plates and "fingerprinting" their vehicles. The bulletin outlines seven vulnerabilities in Motorola Solutions' Vigilant ALPRs, including missing encryption and insufficiently protected credentials.

To give a sense of the scale of the data collected with ALPRs, EFF found that just 80 agencies in California using primarily Vigilant technology, collected more than 1.6 billion license plate scans (CSV) in 2022. This data can be used to track people in real time, identify their "pattern of life," and even identify their relations and associates. An EFF analysis from 2021 found that 99.9% of this data is unrelated to any public safety interest when it's collected. If accessed by malicious parties, the information could be used to harass, stalk, or even extort innocent people.

Unlike location data a person shares with, say, GPS-based navigation app Waze, ALPRs collect and store this information without consent and there is very little a person can do to have this information purged from these systems. ...



#1 | Posted by LampLighter at 2024-06-23 03:06 PM | Reply

BS. We've known since conception that these programs were unconstitutional and would eventually be used in nefarious ways. It could never not happen. And it only gets worse from here..

#2 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2024-06-23 04:35 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

AI will figure out a constructive use for all that data

#3 | Posted by brerrabbit at 2024-06-23 09:32 PM | Reply

How about personal tracking devices instead? You're carrying one now, after all. Most of us are also driving a tracking device.

#4 | Posted by look_inward at 2024-06-24 09:01 AM | Reply

This is great stuff. Imagine a J6 event where the GOV could track and know every vehicle involved, just more data to find the domestic terrorists.

Whats not to like.

#5 | Posted by oneironaut at 2024-06-24 10:31 AM | Reply

Whats not to like.

#5 | POSTED BY ONEIRONAUT

It you are a member of the Chinese communist party it's great news.

#6 | Posted by donnerboy at 2024-06-24 10:41 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

"This is great stuff. Imagine a J6 event where the GOV could track and know every vehicle involved, just more data to find the domestic terrorists.
Whats not to like.
#5 | POSTED BY ONEIRONAUT AT 2024-06-24 10:31 AM"

In all the J6 videos I saw, I missed seeing any vehicles that were involved.

Swing and a miss ...

#7 | Posted by TrueBlue at 2024-06-24 11:04 AM | Reply

@#3 ... AI will figure out a constructive use for all that data ...

A use for? Yes.

A constructive use for? Constructive for whom?


But yeah, when the contents of those databases are used to train AI, the surveillance capabilities that will arise from that endeavor will not be a good thing.


#8 | Posted by LampLighter at 2024-06-24 11:33 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#8 | Posted by LampLighter

People have no clue how much good and bad is going to be coming from AI. The chinese are using it extensively to track civilians in major metro areas now - not just license plates but facial recognition. They have been doing it for years at this point. If you are out in public they can locate you in a couple of minutes and probably less now.

#9 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2024-06-24 03:08 PM | Reply

If you are out in public they can locate you in a couple of minutes and probably less now.

#9 | POSTED BY GALAXIEPETE

And, as I understand it, you get rated and your credit is based on your public and political behaviors. Similar to that Black Mirror episode called Nosedive.

Sounds like a real AI dystopia they got going over there.

#10 | Posted by donnerboy at 2024-06-24 03:15 PM | Reply

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