Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News

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Saturday, December 07, 2019

The Supreme Court on Friday granted President Trump's emergency request to temporarily block a congressional subpoena for his financial records from Deutsche Bank. read more


The nationwide survey, published Friday, showed interest in the probe has fallen to 62 percent, from 70 percent in a Nov 1-2 poll. The decline is a worrisome sign for Democrats, who have been concerned that "impeachment fatigue" would set in the longer the process is drawn out. Interest dropped among Republicans, Democrats and independents alike, the polling showed. Seventy-one percent of Democrats said they are following the impeachment inquiry, compared with 78 percent in early November. The number of GOP voters who said the same plummeted 10 points to 60 percent. Interest among independent voters dropped 8 points to 54 percent.


The latest economic numbers -- 266,000 jobs created in November, unemployment at a 50-year low -- make one thing very clear: President Donald Trump has a path to win a second term next year.
Yes, you can quibble about whether the strong November report or the upward revisions in job gains for the last two months or the broader upswing in the economy is due to Trump and his policies. But what we know -- both from our political history and more recent polling -- is that presidents get credit when the economy is strong and blame when it is weak.


Monday, November 25, 2019

In a free society, we must accept that bad actors will try to take advantage of our openness. But we need to learn to question our own and others' biases on social media. We need to teach " to individuals of all ages " that we shouldn't simply believe or repost anonymous users because they used the same hashtag we did, and neither should we accuse them of being a Russian bot simply because we disagree with their perspective. We need to teach digital civility. It will not only weaken foreign efforts, but it will also help us better engage online with our neighbors, especially the ones we disagree with.


Friday, November 22, 2019

With the public phase of the House impeachment inquiry believed to be complete, Democrats are inching closer to impeaching President Donald Trump. But there remains to be any House Republican who has indicated they support the removal of the president"leaving GOP leadership worry-free. In fact, the moderate GOP members whom Democrats pointed to as potential swing voters who could shift the impeachment tide within the Republican Party swung the opposite direction, backing their colleagues' opinion that the allegations that Trump engaged in bribery or abused his power lack evidence. And while his alleged wrongdoing may have very well been improper, they said, they've made clear their belief that Trump's actions do not deserve impeachment. read more


Comments

No I'm incapable of joining in your delusion that facts are opinions.
I'm right because the facts are on my side. #32 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2019-12-04 08:10 PM

I've never complained that you're too mean to me. I've expressed to you that you try to argue like a child.

Facts can be opinions. It is a fact that in Sondland testified that, in his opinion, the Pres engaged in quid pro quo. It is also a fact that Sondland admitted, under oath, that his testimony was based on speculation. It is a fact that Zelinskyy stated that the President did not engage in QPQ. Both of those are opinions....and they are facts.

Did you have any facts that you wanted to add that weren't also opinions? Did any of the evidence include directly linking Trump to a QPQ, because fivethirtyeight.com says it didn't.


In broad strokes, Democrats laid out three questions at the beginning of the public phase of the inquiry, which they said would serve as the foundation for their investigation (and perhaps also the articles of impeachment). Those questions are:

1.Did Trump request an investigation that would personally benefit his political interests?
2.Did Trump and his allies pressure Ukraine into committing to an investigation, including threatening to withhold a White House meeting or military aid?
3.Did the White House then try to suppress or conceal information about Trump's actions with regard to Ukraine?


My problem with your version of the situation is that I don't believe that there has been evidence, other than opinion, proving that the answer to #2 is yes. Please, really, if you have any evidence, not opinion, that shows that 2nd to have been done, share it. #2 really is a tricky bit. While I agree that there may be evidence of holding back from a meeting in exchange for an announced investigation, that hardly meets the criteria of 'serious'. On the other hand, while withholding military aid would certainly be considered 'serious', it fails to meet the criteria of having 'concrete evidence'.

But of course, the Democrats are still missing perhaps the most essential piece of the puzzle " a smoking gun for their second question of whether Trump ordered that military aid and/or a White House meeting be conditioned on the investigations.

To be sure, Democrats do have a wide array of evidence strongly suggesting that the people involved in pushing for the investigations " including the Ukrainians " understood that a White House meeting and nearly $400 million in military aid hung in the balance. Multiple witnesses testified over the course of the public hearings that it was clear to them that there was a quid pro quo. But as Republicans pointed out repeatedly over the course of the hearings, none of these witnesses ever talked to Trump directly. Even Sondland, the one witness who did communicate with Trump directly about the investigations, said he only "presumed" there was a connection and had never heard Trump say it.


Please show us your expertise.

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